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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

BUSINESS MANAGER 



JOLack and (^foLd 

VOLUME XXVI 

PUBLISHED ANNUALLY 
BY THE 

BLACK AND GOLD STAFF 

OF THE 
WINSTON-SALEM HIGH SCHOOLS 



- Forsyth County Public Library 
660 West Fifth Street 
Winston-Salem, NC 27101 



FOREWORD 

In January, 1837, a resolution of the General As- 
sembly made it the duty of the president and 
directors of the Literary Fund to submit a plan 
for a system of common schools in North 
Carolina, suited to the condition and 
means of the State. From this begin- 
ning developed the present school 
system, the hundreth anniversary 
of which is being celebrated this 
year. The Black and Gold 
Staff has tried in this book, 
to pay tribute to North 
Carolina Education. 



I 




Mr. B. S. WOMBLE, Chairman of Winston-Salem School Board 
WINSTON-SALEM SCHOOL BOARD 



Mr. T. W. Blackwell 
Mr. Charles Creech 



Mr. C. T. Leinbach 
Dr. William Sprunt 



Mr. E. F. Tullock 
Mrs. W. L. Wharton 




John Watson Moore, A. B., Ed. M„ Superintendent Winston-Salem Schools 

Davidson College, Duke University, University of North Carolina, 

University of Chicago, Columbia University 



EDUCATION IN NORTH CAROLINA 

1 705 — Charles Griffin, the first professional teacher in 
North Carolina was sent to Pasquotank County. 

1760 — First academy established at Wilmington. 

1772 — A school for little girls established by the Moravians 
at Salem. This later developed into Salem College. 

1776 — Adoption of a constitutional provision for legislative 
establishment of schools and for a university. 

1825 — Establishment of the State Literary Fund. 

1837 — A resolution directing that a plan for common 
schools, suited to the condition and resources of the 
State, prepared and reported to the next General As- 
sembly. 

1839 — First Common School Law drawn by William W. 
Cherry. 

1852— Plan of graded school system outlined at the annual 
meeting of the State Educational Association. 

1 864 — Legislature passed graded school bill. 

1865— First institution for negroes set up to offer courses 
above elementary level. 

1870— First public white school established in Greensboro. 

1903 — The Literary Fund set aside exclusively as a means 
of building and improving schoolhouses. 

1907— Legislature authorized the establishment of rural 
high schools. 

1914— The establishment of the first County Training 
Schools for negroes. 

1915 — Public high school in every county. 

1917— State certification of teachers begun on a definite 
standard of training. High schools declared by su- 
preme court to be a part of the public school system. 

1918— Constitutional amendment passed setting up a mini- 
mum term of six months. 

1919— First accredited high schools for negroes. 

1920— First listing of high schools accredited by the State 
Department of Public Instruction. 

1921— General Assembly provided the first Special Build- 
ing Fund of $5,000,000 for building schoolhouses. 

1923— Provisions made for county- wide organizations of 
schools. First public high schools for negroes were 
accredited by the state. 

1929— Beginning of bus transportation in negro schools. 

1931— Complete support for a term of six months of school 
assumed by the state. 

1933— Complete support for a term of eight months of 
school assumed by the state. 

—North Carolina Education 




lJ^uljLiaation± 




BLACK AND GOLD STAFF 

Elizabeth Tucker Jim Gray 

Lawson Withers Mildred Davis Bill Stewart 

Melba Mackie Eugenia Baynes Ed Mendenhall 

Alma Brooks Mary Bennett 

BLACK AND GOLD 



Sam Smith 
Paul Early 
Richard Cobb 
Lois Zimmerman 



Page eleven 



BLACK AND GOLD STAFF 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Elizabeth Tucker Editor-in-chief 

Sam Smith Managing Editor Paul Early Organization Editor 

Bill Stewart ^Assistant Managing Editor Richard Cobb Snapshot Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Eugenia Baynes Melba Mackie Lois Zimmerman Ed Mendenhall 

Mary Bennett Alma Brooks 

SENIOR EDITORS 

Lawson Withers Mildred Davis 

LITERARY STAFF 

Marjorie Patterson Joyce Safrit Phyllis Morgan 

ART STAFF 



Aubrie Enochs 



Elizabeth Stoney 
Helen Sullivan 



Mary Alice Ader Carolyn Nelson 
Betsy Trotter 



TYPISTS 



Edna Bridges 



Verona McGowan 



PINE WHISPERS 

Published and Printed Bi-weekly by the students of Winston-Salem High Schools 

LITERARY STAFF 



REYNOLDS SECTION 

Lawson Withers Editor-in-chief 

Mildred Davis Managing Editor 

Paul Early Sports Editor 

Peggy Dean Co-Sports Editor 

Eugenia Baynes Associate Editor 

Elizabeth Tucker Associate Editor 

Elinor Trent Exchange Editor 

Joyce Safrit Exchange Editor 



SOUTH SECTION 

Pauline Yontz Editor-in-chief 

Lois Zimmerman Managing Editor 

John Crouch Sports Editor 

NORTH SECTION 

Frances Newsom Editor-in-chief 

Lawrence Highnll Managing Editor 



REPORTERS 



Moyer Hendrix 
Bill Stewart 
Barbara Lasley 
Elizabeth Taylor 
Frances Benson 
Mary Rhodes 
Hilda Parrish 
Sebia Midyette 
Betsy Trotter 
Evelyn Easley 
Jeanette Minnis 
Ralph Rink 



Guellah Poindexter 
Juanita Ragland 
Sam Smith 
Phyllis Morgan 
Richard Cobb 
Everette Lindsay 
Caroline Andrews 
Olga Cox 
Marjorie Williams 
Thornton Rose 
Harry Lee Nunn 
Shirley Tudor 



Marjorie Patterson 
Rosemary Nunn 
Virginia Peddycord 
John Dunnagun 
Melmuth Thompson 
■Melba Mackie 
Mary Alice Ader 
Harry Hondros 
Hazel Cobler 
Agnes Freeman 
Rex Coston 
Tommy Vance 



ADVISERS 



Miss Mary Sterling 

Miss Annie Lee Singletary_ 
Miss Mary Lucille Pegram_ 
Miss Margaret McLean 



Druscilla Everhart 
Evelyn Caudle 
Mildred Hedgecock 
Juanita Whitlow 
Mary Leonard 
Grace Darden 
Jean Simpson 
Sara Barrett 
Alma Brooks 
Wendell Self 
M. B. Byrd 
F. L. Wooten 



_R. J. Reynolds High 

North High 

South High 

South High 




Lawson Withers 

Paul Early 

Eugenia Baynes 

Joyce Safrit 

Lawrence Highfill 



Mildred Davis 

Frances Newsom 

Anne Jarvis 

Pauline Yontz 



Bill Tudor 

Peggy Dean 

Elizabeth Tucker 

Elinor Trent 

J. E. Tate 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page thirteen 



I 





Davis, Cody, Whittington, Johnson, Clay, Peterson, Salmons, Morgan, Cahill, Mock, Gray, Barnes, Tate, Stockton, 
Cohn, Tudor, Ried, Wilson, Mr. Crowell. Perry, Leinbach 

BLACK AND GOLD BUSINESS STAFF 

James Gray Business Manager 

Albert Wilson Virginia Clay Carolyn Salmons 

Bob Cohn Margaret Whittington Rachael Sloan 

Norman Stockton J. E. Tate 

PINE WHISPERS BUSINESS STAFF 



Tom Edwards 
Edna Davis 
Donald Perry 
Rosemary Cody 
Theodore Leinbach 
Phyllis Morgan 



Bill Tudor Business Manager 

Alice Cahill Robert Newsom 

Lucia Johnson Louise Barnes 

M. B. Byrd Margie Fulp 

Douglas Peterson J. A. Mock 

Ruth Landingham Elsie Jennings 

J. E. Tate 



Mr. R. S. Haltiwanger— Business Adviser Mr. L. W. Crowell Business Adviser 



Page fourteen 



BLACK AND GOLD 




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To 
Mr. James Allen Bunn, B. S. 
Guilford College 
Coach and Teacher 
whose coaching creates in all a clean heart, whose teach- 
ing lends inspiration to many, whose willing and sympathetic 
service to South makes an ever increasing place in the 
hearts o£ both faculty and students, we do hereby dedicate 
this section of the Black and Gold. 




Mr. Kermit Glenn Phillips, A. B. 

University of North Carolina 

Principal of South High School 



SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 

OFFICE ADMINISTOR 
Paige Charles, Secretary 

CAFETARIA 
Rheta Budell Hyatt, A. B. 

Ashe vi lie Teachers College 
East Carolina Teachers College 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Artelee Puett, B. E., B. A., Head of Commercial Department 

University of North Carolina 

Tiny M. Odom, A. B. Dessie Potter, A. B. C. T. Phillips 

Columbia University Bowling Green College of Commerce University of North Carolina 

Columbia College Bowling Green, Kentucky University of Colorado 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 
Moselle Stephenson, A. B., Head of English Department 

Winthrop College 

Lavenia A. Fuller, B. S. Hattie Googe, A. B. 

North Carolina State College Winthrop College 

Margaret French McLean, A. B. Clara Evelyn Tiller, B. S. 

ci r- 11 Harrisburq College 

balem College -vx/u- j n* /* n 

3 William and Mary College 

Mary Lucile Pegram, A. B. Peabody College 

Greensboro College Fannie Love Mecum, A. B. 

Greensboro Woman's College 

LIBRARIAN 
Hazel Baity, B. A., B. A. in L. S. 

Meredith College, University of North Carolina 

HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth Armantine Redwine, B. S. Rheta Budell Hyatt, A. B. 

Woman's College of University of North Carolina Asheville Teachers College 

East Carolina Teachers College 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT 
Ivan J. Bash, B. S., Head of Industrial Arts Department 

Miami University, University of Detroit 

Lawrence A. Fox, A. B. Preston Bruce Raiford, B. S. 

Iowa State University North Carolina State College 

Virgil Thompson, B. Ed. 

Eastern Illinois State Teachers College 

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 
Virginia Louise Allen, A, B., Head of Lauguage Department 

Salem College 

Edna Leah Higgins, A. B. 

Salem College 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 
Nan Robertson Turney, A. B. Head of Mathematics Department 

Salem College 

Eleanor Grey Cain, A, B. Hattie Googe, A. B. Virginia Garner, A. B. 

Salem College Winthrop College Salem College 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 



fames Allen Bunn, B. S. 

Guilford College 



Ruth Frances Meinung, A. B. 

Salem College 

State University 

Columbia University 

SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
Daisy Lee Glasgow, A. B., M. A., Head of Social Science Department 



Theodore E. Griffin, A. B. 

Guilford College 

Kathleen Hall 

University of North Carolina 

BLACK AND GOLD 



Salem College 
Columbia University 



Ned Raeford Smith, A. B. 

Duke University 
Salem College 

Virginia Batte Johnson, A. B. 

University of North Carolina 



Page ninetee 




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Jn ifflemnrtam 

VIRGINIA WOOTERS 

January 17, 1920 
October 10, 1936 




JANUARY CLASS OFFICERS 



G. R. Pulliam.- 
Mildred Carroll- 
Helen WillarcL 
Jack Styron 



President 

.Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Ruth Gatewood. 

Anne Fort 

Mildred Carroll - 
Pauline Yontz — 



.Historian 
_ -Prophet 
.Testator 
Poet 



Betty Marie King- Mascot 

Miss Daisy Lee Glasgow Adviser 

Colors: Scarlet and Gold 
Flower: Talisman Rose 

Motto: "Wisdom to know the right, 
Courage to do the right, 
Sympathy and understanding 
To do it in the right way." 



Page twenty-fouc 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Stephen Marshall Boden- 
heimer 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Eat and 

Sleep 

San. Dept. 4; Schol. Dept. 2; Board 

Mem. 2. 

Mildred Virginia Carroll 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Have Plenty 

Of Time 
Supt. Per. Re!. Dept. 4; Supt. Traf- 
fic Dept. 4; Lib. Council 3; Mono- 
gram 3. 4; I. B. S. 4; Cheerleader 
4; Lib. Page 1; G. R. 4; Pres. 4; 
Dram. Club 1, 3: Rec. Dept. 4; 
Class V. Pres. 4; Tennis 2. 4. 

Doris Elizabeth Davis 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Wear Curly 

Hair Becomingly 
Pres. Student Body 4; V. Pres. Stu- 
dent Body 4; Sec. Student Body 2,3; 
Supt. Pers. Rel. Dept. 3: Supt. 
Schol. Dept. 2; Traffic Dept. 2, 3, 
4; Board Mem. 2. 3, 4; Lib. Coun- 
cil 3, 4; Sr. Marshall 3; Pine Whis- 
pers 3; Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; Debat- 
ing Club 4; Pres. Inter-Club Coun- 
cil G. R. 4; I. B. S. 4; Monogram 
2, 3, 4. 



Lottie Virginia Brock 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Own A Blue 

'37 Ford V-S 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 2; Traffic Dept. 2, 
3; Monogram 3; Schol. Dept. 2; Rec. 
Dept. 1; Dram. Club 1, 2. 



Georgia Juanita Cline 

General Course 

Desire-— To See Money 
ving On Trees 
Schol. Dept. 1; Monogram 2; Honor 
Club 3. 



Suppressed 
Gr 



Virginia Stuart Easter 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Own A 12- 

Cylinder Lincoln 
Monogram 3; G. R. 1, 2; Board 
Mem. 3. 



Eva Opal Brown 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Blues 

Singer 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 2. 3. 4; Traffic 
Dept. 3. 4; Lib. Council 3. 4; Mon- 
ogram 4; Lib. Page 2, 3, 4; Pine 
Whispers 3, 4; G. R. 3. 4; Dram. 
Club 1. 



Ora Elizabeth Crow 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A Beauty 

Parlor Operator 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 1; Traffic Dept. 1; 
G. R. 2, 3, 4; Girl Scouts 1. 2, 3; 
Schol. Dept. 3; Tennis 3. 

Henry Lee Folsom 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Head 
Football Coach 
Baseball 3; Football 3, 4; Basketball 
3; Monogram 4; I. B. S. 4; Pers. 
Rel. Dept. 3, 4; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; San. 
Dept. 4; Board Mem. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page twenty-five 





Anne Laura Fort 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Talk Louder 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 4; Traffic Dept. 
4; Lib. Council 3, 4; Monogram 1 , 
4; Honor Club 1; Lib. Page 1; G. 
R. Pres 4: Sec. Student Body 4; 
Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; Board Mem. 3; 
Class Sec. 3: Sr. Marshall 3. 



Ruth Elizabeth Gatewood Sue Louise Henderson 



General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Pilot A 
Plane 
San. Dept. 1, 2; Pers. Rel. Dept. 
3, 4; Monogram 1; Schol. Dept. 3, 
4; Lib. Page 3, 4; Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 
4; Dram. Club I; The Segya 3, 4; 
Board Mem. 2. 



Beatrice Lela Markland Mary Wilmoth Money 



Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Lady 

Of Leisure 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 3, 4; Traffic Dept. 
3, 4; Lib. Council 4; Monogram 2; 
1. B. S. 4; G. R. 4- V. Pres. 4: 
Rec. Dept. 3; Dram. Club 1; Board 
Mem. 3. 4; Soccer 2; Basketball 
3. 4. 



Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Control My 

Temper 
San. Dept. I. 2; Pers. Rel. Dept. 
2; Traffic Dept. 4; Monogram 2, 4; 
I. B. S. 4; Schol. Dept. 1; G. R. 4: 
Rec. Dept. 3, 4; Lost and Found 
Dept. 2: Pine Whispers 4; Basket- 
ball 3, 4; Tennis 4; Sr. Marshall 3. 



Frances Louise Pegram Frances Adelaide Perry- 



General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Live Happy 

Ever After 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 3. 4; Traffic Dept. 
4: Lib. Council 3, 4; Monogram 3; 
G. R. 3, 4; Lost and Found Dept. 
1; Board Mem. 2, 3; Rec. Dept. 3. 



Page twenty-six 



man 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Have 

Natural Curls 

Monogram 2; Board Mem. 2, 3; 

Dram. Club 1, 2; Honor Club 2. 



Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Six Feet 

Tall 
Per. Rel. Dept. 2; Lib. Council 3, 
4; I. B. S. 4; Board Mem. 3; G. R. 
3. 4; V. Pres. 4; Schol. Dept. 1; 
Soccer 3, 4: Basketball 4. 

Mary Louise Nifong 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Get Rid Of 

My Freckles 
San. Dept. 3; Schol. Dept. 2; Lib. 
Page 2, 4. 

Grady R. Pulliam, Jr. 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Climb Mt. 
Everest 
Pres. Student Body 3, 4; Ass't Sec. 
Student Body 3; Supt. San. Dept. 
2. 3; Supt. Pers. Rel. Dept. 4; 
Class Pres. 4; I. B. S. Club Pres. 
4; Hi-Y 1, 2, 3. 4; Cheerleader 3, 
4; Traffic Dept. 2, 3. 4; Pers. Rel. 
Dept. 2. 3. 4; Rec. Dept. 3, 4: Lib. 
Council 3, 4; Monogram 2, 3, 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Jack Allison Styron 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Swim The 

English Channel 
San. Dept. 3; Pers. Rel. Dept. 2 
3. 4: Traffic Dept. 1. 2, 3, 4; Lib 
Council 3. 4; Monogram 1, 4: I. B 
S. 4; Cheerleader 3. 4; Hi-Y 1, 2 
3. 4; Band 1, 2. 3. 4; Rec. Dept 
3. 4; Pine Whispers 4; Board Mem 
2. 3, 4: Class Treas. 4. 



Helen Grace Willard 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Own A 
White Limousine 
Pers. Rel. Dept. 4; Traffic Dept. 
2. 3. 4; Lib. Council 3; G. R. 3, 
4; Sec. 3; Dram. Club. 1. 2, 4: 
Board Mem. 3. 4; Monogram 3; 
Class Sec. 4. 



Pauline Yontz 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Patsy 
Kelly II 
San. Dept. 1, 2; Pers. Rel. Dept. 
4: Traffic Dept. 4; Monogram 2, 
3; I. B. S. 4; Schol. Dept. 2, 3; 
Lib. Page 2; G. R. 4; Nat'l. Hon. 
Soc. 4; Dram. Club 1, 2: Lost and 
Found Dept. 2; Pine Whispers 4. 



OTHER SENIORS 
Reid Sandford Holder 

General Course 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page twenty-seveu 




..y^rfk, tO.^i 



SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL CLASS POEM 

Pauline Yontz, Class Poet 



Yl&> 



Now our duties at South are completed, 

We must leave every school-mate and friend; 

We have failed or succeeded; 

It's too late all our wrong acts to mend. 

Now that our new life's beginning, 
We may prove we can do things worthwhile 
By showing we're worthy of winning, 
And that all will need is a trial. 

May we all learn to serve our nation 
At each task whether great, small or new, 
And prove we have had education, 
And act as South High taught us to. 

May we live up to South's expectations, 
Keeping love, hope, honor, and trust; 
Holding always the high admiration 
Of those who have had faith in us! 



w 



Page twenty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




SOUTH JANUARY SUPERLATIVES 



BEST LOOKING 
Jack Styron 
Doris Davis 

MOST ATHLETIC 

Reid Holder 

Wilmonth Money 



FRIENDLIEST 

Beatrice Markland 

G. R. Pulliam 

BEST-ALL-ROUND 
G. R. Pulliam 
Doris Davis 



MOST INTELLECTUAL 

Anne Fort 

Jack Styron 

WITTIEST 

Ruth Gatewood 

Marshall Bodenheimer 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page twenty-nine 




Ji-Vi**. 



HISTORY OF JANUARY CLASS, 1937 



Ruth Gatewood, Historian 



The spring of 1933 marked the be- 
ginning of our eventful history. It was 
during our green young freshman year 
that we formed the foundation for the 
happy years that were to follow. 

Since our school was a junior high, 
we were combined with the sixth and 
seventh grades during our freshman and 
sophomore year. We did not elect any 
class officers; however, Doris Davis 
served as secretary of the student organ- 
ization. There was also among us others 
who were destined to become leaders. 

As "love sick juniors" we were organ- 
ized for the first time. In fact we ac- 
complished a great deal of which we 
were proud. When we elected officers, 
Doris Davis was chosen to be our pres- 
ident; Anne Fort, secretary; and Jack 
Styron, treasurer. Many members of 
our class held outstanding organization 
jobs. Among them was G. R. Pulliam, 
who served as the school's president. 
Although we had many capable workers, 
we often found ourselves in need of help 
and advice of Miss Virginia Allen, our 
sponsor. 

We enjoyed many social activities, 
but the crowning event was when we 
entertained the first seniors at a pioneer 
Junior-Senior Banquet. 

In sports we were well represented by 
both the boys and the girls. Cheering 
and hard fighting pushed our teams to 
numerous victories. 

The only flaw in our happiness was 
the illness and death of Katherine Burns. 

Before we realized it, we reached the 
first half of our senior year. We were 
given the senior privileges for which we 
had been longing. Our first task was to 
choose our class leaders. Jack Styron 
was president, Doris Davis, vice presi- 
dent, and Anne Fort, secretary. Again 
members of our class held prominent po- 
sitions in organization work. G. R. was 
re-elected as president of the student- 



body, and Doris Davis served as vice 
president. We had many good times 
with Miss Margaret McLean as our 
sponsor. However, the main issue was 
work. 

When we started on the last mile of 
our road, there were only twenty-two 
of us, but we were a very happy group 
with Miss Daisy Lee Glasgow as our 
class sponsor. Without her helpful 
guidance we would never have gotten 
through the trials of graduation. Indeed, 
our senior happiness would have been 
complete but for the loss of one of our 
number, Virginia Wooters. 

Under the leadership of G. R. Pulliam 
as president, Mildred Carroll, vice presi- 
dent, Helen Willard, secretary, and Jack 
Styron, treasurer; we worked together 
successfully. 

Doris Davis was president of the stu- 
dent body and president of the Inter- 
Club Council of Girl Reserves. Also, 
Anne Fort was vice president of the 
school. Other members continued to hold 
positions of importance. 

Our social life was certainly not ne- 
glected. Mildred Carroll, chairman of 
the social committee, gave us many good 
times. We shall never forget the par- 
ties Miss Glasgow and Miss Hall gave 
us, but the acme of entertainment was 
the Banquet which the Juniors gave us 
on the Roof Garden of the Robert E. 
Lee Hotel. 

Class day and graduation will always 
stand out in our memory. We shall 
never forget the splendid talk which Dr. 
Ralph A. Herring gave. If ever it is 
necessary for us to wear caps and gowns 
again, perhaps we shall know how it 
should be done. 

As the years roll by, our hearts will 
turn to praise you, dear South High. We 
shall always remember the things you 
have taught us and the things for which 
you stand. 



Page thirty 



BLACK AND GOLD 



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PROPHECY OF JANUARY CLASS, 1937 

Anne Fort, Prophet 



On a cold January day in 1947 I hur- 
ried into the home of Mrs. Pat Patterson 
(Louise Henderson). 

"Come right in," Louise explained 
"You could never guess what I'm doing. 
Anne, I'm addressing cards to all the 
members of the '37 graduating class in- 
forming them of the alumni meeting to 
be held next month." 

"How do you find time for so many 
things, Louise?" I questioned. "I have 
so much business to handle in mv beauty 
shop, that I can hardly do all that's re- 
quired of me." 

"I imagine the "Ann Art Beauty Shop- 
pe" does keep you busy, but I promised 
Helen Willard, secretary of the class, I 
would address these cards for her. She 
is a buyer for the Silver's Store, Inc., and 
is on a business trip. I hope she can get 
back for the reunion." 

We settled down to addressing cards, 
and who should be listed first but the 
class sponsor, Mrs. Laerski (Miss Daisy 
Lee Glasgow). The "he" turned out to 
be not a fake but a reality. However, 
she couldn't give up her job, for she hop- 
ed that she might meet another "gem" 
(?) like the January Class of 1937. 

"I hate to ask G. R. away from his 
pleasant job, with the Pulliam Under- 
takers, but we must have him here," 
Louise said. 

Doris Davis "the great debater," was 
reached by sending a card to Richmond, 
Virginia where she charms the court 
with her oratorical ability and beauty. 
Mildred Carroll receives her card in 
Richmond, for of course, wherever David 
is, Jonathan is not far away. Mildred 
is the head of the Recreation Depart- 
ment of Richmond. 

Two cards found their way to New 
York. There Henry Folsom is the 
owner of Folsom Ready to Wear Store. 
The slogan is "Fol som values up to take 
home." Wilmoth Money has found a 

BLACK AND GOLD 



way to use her graceful walk by model- 
ling woman's clothes in Henry's store. 

"Pauline Yontz keeps up with all as 
editor of the Twin Citymite — from the 
smallest announcement in the society 
world to the biggest business deal." 

"Only yesterday I read that Marshall 
Bodenheimer had been appointed man- 
ager of S. H. Kress and company. Jua- 
nita Cline, who was floorlady in the 
store here, has been transferred to the 
Greensboro store." 

On the society page appeared the an- 
nouncement Miss Beatrice Markland had 
been "quietly" married to Mr. K. Ever- 
hart. 

"My goodness," I thought, "think of 
Beatrice doing anything quietly!" 

Addressed to the Twin City Day 
Nursery one card reached Ruth Gate- 
wood, the friend of children. Two 
youngsters who stay there are packed off 
to bed early every night with a promise 
from their mother, Mrs. Scott (Elizabeth 
Crow) that when they are high school 
seniors they can stay up as late as they 
wish. 

The city library recived two cards — 
the ones to Opal Brown and Louise Ni- 
fong. Miss Baity has trained them so 
well that they are very efficient librarians 
especially in helping students find ma- 
terial for Mrs. Laerski's history assign- 
ments. 

"The Mayflower Hotel, Washington, 
D. C. " two cards read. There Jack 
Styron and his orchestra furnish dinner 
music with Virginia Brock, as soloist. 

One card went to a young lady who 
has a perfect right to hold men's hands. 
At the John Hopkins Institute in Balti- 
more, Maryland, Virginia Easter, per- 
forms her duties. 

Frances Perryman and Frances Peg- 
ram were reached at the Wachovia 
Bank. They have proved to be valu- 
able stenographers in that business. 
(Continued on page 203) 

Page thirty-one 



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LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JANUARY CLASS 



We, the January Class of 1937 do 
hereby bequeth our worthwhile abilities 
to our fortunate successors. 

Article I 

Item I. To the faculty who have helped 
us often we leave many pleasant mem- 
ories. 

Item II. To the Student Organization 
we leave best wishes to put everything 
over in regular "South Style". 

Item III. To the future senior class spon- 
sors, Miss Daisy Lee Glasgow leaves 
the honor of not having to listen when 
teachers' meetings are held to discuss 
elective sheets. 

Article II 

Item I. To the Junior Boys the Senior 
Boys leave "their" tuxedos, if they can 
get them together. 

Item II. To the Junior Girls the Senior 
Girls leave hopes that there will be 
one boy apiece to take them places. 

Item III. To the football team, we leave 
Reid Holder's and Henry Folsom's 
good sportsmanship and good playing 
with our sincere wishes that they will 
win every game next year and the 
years to come. 

Item IV. To the I. B. S. and the cheer- 
leaders, the Seniors leave their hopes, 
their lusty cheering, and loyal support. 
Article III 

Item I. To soft voiced Helen Lewis, 
Anne Fort leaves her loud voice which 
can easily be heard any time, any- 
where. 

Item II. To the girl who dares to try, 
Louise Henderson leaves her seat in 
the LaSalle. 

Item III. To the future Junior Class 
Leader of Songs, Beatrice Markland 
leaves ability to get a harmonizing tune 
without a harmonica. 

Item IV. To Louise Ervin, Helen Will- 
ard leaves her dramatic ability with a 
shy wish that she will use it properly. 

Item V. To the future class treasurer, 
Jack Styron leaves his deep pockets, 



memorandum book, and most accurate 
ability to miscount money and to make 
unbalanced financial statements. 

Item VI. To Lela Gatewood, Juanita 
Cline leaves her recently acquired abil- 
ity to write letters of adjustment that 
will be acceptable to Miss Potter. 

Item VII. To Ruby Carroll, Frances 
Pegram leaves her desire to be a beau- 
tician in hopes that some day Ruby can 
wave Greta Garbo's hair. 

Item VIII. To J. M. Hall, Marshall Bod- 
enheimer wills his excellent memory of 
history dates, places, and things. 

Item IX. To Richard Orrell, Henry Fol- 
som leaves his winning way with the 
feminine race along with that ever pre- 
sent smile. 

Item X. To the future Journalism Clas- 
ses, Pauline Yontz leaves her poetic 
ability, dependability, and helpfulness. 

Item XI. To Carrie Donnell, Ruth Gate- 
wood leaves her humorous character. 

Item XII. To Virginia Sprinkle, Opal 
Brown leaves her silly giggle with re- 
grets that such a clever thing must be 
left behind. 

Item XIII. To Jimmie Whitlow, Reid 
Holder leaves his witticism in hopes 
that Jimmie will be rewarded with as 
many laughs. 

Item XIV. To Paul Ledbetter, G. R. 
Pulliam leaves his quiet and dignified 
way. 

Item XV. To Audrey James, Louise 
Nifong leaves her gray hairs. 

Item XVI. To Doris Highsmith, Eliza- 
beth Crow wills her rags and buckets 
used for keeping the senior home room 
clean. 

Item XVII. To Doris Bell, Wilmoth 
Money leaves her slim features and 
graceful walk. 

Item XVIII. To Jack Brown, Virginia 
Brock leaves her high degree of speed 
in typing, in hopes that he will make 
his speed. 

(Continued on page 208) 



Page thirty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 






X- 




V .«*. 



^Bk^tk 






SOUTH HIGH JUNE CLASS OFFICERS 

Roy Bovender President Helen Swaim Testator 

Ralph Leonard '.Vice President Annie Jarvis Poet 

Lucile Wyatt Secretary Everettc Charles Historian 

Lois Zimmerman Prophet 

Bob Anderson Mascot 

Miss Margaret McLean Adviser Miss Eleanor Cain Adviser 



Colors: Blue and Gold 



Flower: Talisman Rose 



Motto: "Good, better, best, 
Never let rest, 
Until the good is better, 
And the better is the best. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page thirty-three 




Virgil H. Allen 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To See What 

There Was Before There Wasn't 

Anything 

Lost and Found Dept. 1; Schol. 

Dept. 2, 4; Monogram 3, 4; I. B. S. 

4; Band 4; Hi-Y, 4. 



William Blaine Bowers 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play The 

Basscon 
San. Dept. 1, 2. 3; Band 3. 4; Hi-Y 
2, 3. 4; 1. B. S. 4; Debating 4. 

Everette Wade Charles 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play A 
Trumpet Like Del Staigers 
Traffic Dept. 3; San. Dept. 1, 2; 
Supt. Schol. Dept 3; Lib. Council 3; 
Hi-Y 4; Monogram 3; Band 3; Nat'l. 
Hon. Soc. 4. 



Margaret Lee Bauguss 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Marry A 
Certain Boy 
Board Mem. 2. 3. 4; Traffic Dept. 
3, 4; Rec. Dept. 2, 4. Monogram 2; 
I. B. S. 4; G. R. 3, 4. 



Ruth M. Branon 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be An Air 

Hostess 
Lost and Found 4; Traffic Dept. 4; 
Lib. Council 4. 

Walter Ambus Collins 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go To 
College 
Board Mem. 2, 3: San. Dept. 1, 2. 
3; Schol. Dept. 1; I. B. S. 4; Mono- 
gram 3; Football 4. 



Roy Richard Bovender 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Good 

Sport 
Supt. Per. Rel. Dept. 3; Supt. Lib. 
Council 3; Supt. Traffic 4; Schol. 
Dept. 3: Monogram 4; Hi-Y 4; 
Baseball 1. 2. 3. 4; Basketball 2, 3. 
4; Soccer 1; Tennis 3, 4; I. B. S. 4. 



Gladys Elizabeth Brown 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Catch "The 
Star That Fell Out Of Heaven" 
Board Mem. 3; Schol. Dept 3; "Pine 
Whispers" 4; Dram. Club 1; G. R. 
3, 4. 

Roy Eugene Cranford 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Big 
Merchant 
San. Dept. 3; Lib. Council 3. 4: 
Per. Rel. Dept. 1, 2, 3, 4; Rec. 
Dept. 4; Schol. Dept. 3; I. B. S. 4; 
Monogram 4. 



Page thirty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Dorothea Nell Crater 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Successful 

In Life 
Board Mem. 3; Traffic Dept. 4; Lib. 
Page 1, 3, 4; Monogram 3. 



William Jay Dillon 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Good 
Looking 
Board Mem. 2; Hi-Y 3. 



Irene M. Edman 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be The 
Wife Of A Workman 
G. R. 3; Traffic Dept. 2, 3. 



John Elton Crouch 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire-— To Lead a Jazz 
Band 
Dept. 3; Lib.- Council 3, 
S. 4; Monogram 



Supt. San. 

4; Per. Rel. I; I. 

3; Debating 4; "Pine Whispers' 

Supt. Lib. Council 4. 



David Dalton Doty 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An Ace 

Parker 
San. Dept. 2; I. B. S. 4; Monogram 
2, 4; Football 3, 4; Baseball 3; 
Basketball 3. 



Corrie Rosa Lee Ferguson 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Do As I 

Please 

Schol. Dept. 1; Monogram 2; G. R. 

2; Soccer 3; Baseball 3; Basketball 4. 



Nancy Elizabeth Davis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire-— To Travel 
Board Mem. 2: Lost and Found Dept. 
1; Supt. Schol. Dept. 4; Lib. Coun- 
cil 3; G. R. 3, 4; I. B. S. 4; Nat'l. 
Hon. Soc. 4. 



Farris Dalton Eddinger 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Eat All The 

Butter Scotch Pie I Want 
Per. Rel. Dept. 4; Schol. Dept. 4; 
Lib. Council 4. 



Nancy Isabel Fisher 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Famous Athlete 
Per. Rel. Dept. 4; Traffic Dept. 1, 
2, 3, 4: San. Dept. 3; Rec. Dept. 3; 
Lost and Found Dept. 1 ; Board 
Mem. 1, 2, 3; I. B. S. 4; Mono- 
gram 3; Cheerleader 4; G. R. V. 
Pres. 2; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3. 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3. 4; 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page thirty-five 




Mildred Bertha Floyd 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Marry A 

A Rich Doctor 

Schol. Dept. 2: Lib. Page 3, 4; 

Monogram 3; Traffic Dept. 4: Nat'l. 

Hon. Soc. 4. 



Joseph Vincent Gallen, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Travel 
Per. Rel. Dept. 4; Traffic Dept. 4; 
Lib. Council 4. 

Geneva Pauline Henderson 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Sensible 



Katharyn Amanda Foltz 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Start All 

Over Again 

Board Mem. 3; Lost and Found 

Dept. 2; Dram. Club 3; I. B. S. 4. 



Conard Edward Gordon 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Play 
Professional Baseball 
Board Mem. 2, 3; Traffic Dept. 4; 
Per. Rel. Dept. 3; San. Dept. 1, 2; 
1. B. S. 4; Monogram 3; Baseball 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



Helen Earline Holder 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Fly To The 

Moon 
Per. Rel. Dept. 3; Lost and Found 
Dept. 2; G. R. 2, 3. 



Frances Louise Forcum 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be A 

Missionary 

Lost And Found 2; San. Dept. 2; 

"Pine Whispers" 4; I. B. S. 4; 

G. R. 2, 3. 

Ruth Frances Hege 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel 
Per. Rel. Dept. 4; Lost and Found 
Dept. I, 2; Board Mem. 3, 4. 



Annie Bee Jarvis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Live To A 

Ripe Old Age 
San. Dept. 1, 2; Lib. Council 3: 
Traffic Dept. 2; Lib. Page 2, 3, 4; 
"Pine Whispers" 4. 



Page thirty-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Alice Midkiff Johnson 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — Never To Be 

Disappointed 

Board Mem. 3; Lost and Found 

Dept. 4: Traffic Dept. 3; I. B. S. 

4; G. R. 4. 

Dorothy Geraldine Knight 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Travel 
Schol. Dept. 2; Supt. Lost And 
Found Dept. 4; Lib. Page 2; Mono- 
gram 3; I. B. S. 4. 



Mary Glenora Leonard 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Meet Robert 

Taylor 
Traffic Dept. 4; Lost And Found 
Dept. 2, 3; "Pine Whispers" 4; 
Dram. Club 1; Monogram 4; Lib. 
Council 4. 



Edith Desolee Johnson 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — Nor To Wash 

Any More Dishes 
Board Mem. 2: Lib. Page 3, 4; 
Monogram 2; Dram. Club 2. 

Edna Lucille Knouse 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Mrs. 
Hailey 
Lost And Found Dept. 4; Lib. Coun- 
cil 2, 3: G. R. 4; I. B. S. 4; Mono- 
gram 3. 

Mable Virginia Linville 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Get Rid Of 

My Specs 
Schol. Dept. 1, 2; Lib. Council 4; 
Monogram 4. 



Lucy Lee Joyce 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Travel 

Lost And Found Dept. 4; G. R. 1. 

2. 3, 4. 



Josephine Kreeger 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Catch 
Pennies From Heaven" 
San. Dept. 2; Soccer 2. 

Mary Garnette Lynch 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Own A Pair 

Of Unbreakable Glasses 
Board Mem. 1. 2, 3; Supt. Traffic 
Dept. 4; Schol. Dept. 2; Lib. Page 
1; Lib. Council 3. 4; G. R. 4; I. B. 
S. 4; Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4; Per. Rel. 
Dept. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page thirty-seven 




Hoyle L. Mann 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Marry 
Katherine 
Class Pres. 3; Schol. Dept, 2; Traf- 
fic Dept. 2, 3; Per. Rel. Dept. 2, 3; 
San. Dept. 2, 3: Dram. Club 1, 2, 
3; Monogram 3, 4; Football 3, 4; 
Basketball 3. 4; Rec. Dept. 4. 



Agnes Oliva McNair 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel 
Lib. Page 1; Lost And Found Dept. 
4; Monogram 3. 



William Laxton Perryman 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Join The 
Navy 
Board Mem. 2, 3; Traffic Dept. 3; 
San. Dept. 2, 4: Lost And Found 
Dept. 3; Monogram 4; Dram. Club 
1. 



Randell Franklin Manning 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be A 

Successful Salesman 

Traffic Dept. 3, 4; I. B. S. 4; Hi-Y 

2. 3, 4; Monogram 3; Basketball 3, 

4: Tennis 3, 4; Per. Rel. Dept. 4. 



Edwin W. Mendenhall 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Have And 
To Hold 
Board Mem. 2, 3; San. Dept. 1, 2, 
3; Supt. Schol. Dept. 2; Lib. Coun- 
cil 2, 3; Per. Rel. Dept. 2, 3, 4; 
Traffic Dept. 1. 2. 3, 4; I. B. S. 4; 
Monogram 2, 4; Hi-Y 4; Cheerlead- 
er 3, 4; Ass't Sec. Student Body 4. 
Pres. Student Body 4. 

Clois Katharyn Renigar 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Sing On 
C. B. S. 
Schol. Dept. 4; Monogram 3. 



Norma Elizabeth Minish 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Some- 
body's Something 
Per. Rel. Dept. 2, 3; Traffic Dept. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Schol. Dept. 1; Rec. 
Dept. 1; Lost And Found Dept. 1; 
Monogram 3; G. R. 4; Board Mem. 

LeRoy Peebles 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make Some- 
thing Out Of Myself 
San. Dept. 2, 3; Monogram 3. 



Swanson D. Roberts 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A Pro- 
fessional Baseball Player 
San. Dept. 1, 2, 3; Monogram 1; 
Basketball 3; Baseball 3. 



Page thirty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Ernest Sanford Shore, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Finish High 

Schoot 
Traffic Dept. 2; San. Dept. 1; Rec. 
Dept. 2; I. B. S. 4; Monogram 3, 
4; Band 1, 3, 4; Dram. Club 1; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3. 4; 
Soccer I . 



Margaret Arlene Smith 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Walk To 

The Moon 
San. Dept. 1. 2; Schol. Dept. 2, 3. 



Cecil James Stewart 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A Busi- 
ness Man 
San. Dept. 1; Schol. Dept. 2, 3, 4; 
Board Mem. 4; Hi-Y 2, 3. 4. 



Charles C. Simmons 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go Places 
Supt. Lost And Found 3; San. Dept. 
2. 3; Lib. Council 3, 4; Schol. Dept. 
2; Monogram 3; Dram. Club 1; Tra- 
ffic Dept. 4. 



Racheal Louise Smith 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Capture An 

Aviator 



Helen Elizabeth Swaim 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Rather 
Than To Seem To Be 
Board Mem. 2; Supt. Schol. Dept. 
3; Supt. Lib. Council 4; Traffic Dept. 
1. 2, 3, 4; Per. Rel. Dept. 3. 4; 
Lib. Council 3, 4; Monogram 1, 2; 
I. B. S. 4; G. R. 3. 4; Sr. Mar- 
shall 3; Nat'l Hon. Soc. 3, 4, Sec. 
Student Body 4, 



Jack M. Simmons 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Stoop To 

Conquer 

Class Pres. 3; Per. Rel. Dept. 1, 

2. 3, 4: Traffic Dept. 1, 2, 3; Schol. 

Dept. 2; I. B. S. 4. 



Rosa Mohee Speaks 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An 
Aviatrix 
Per. Rel. Dept. 3; Schol. Dept. 3: 
Rec. Dept. 3; Lib. Council 3; I. B. 
S. 4; Monogram 2; Soccer 3, 4; Bas- 
ketball 3, 4. 



J. E. Tate, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A 
Famous Lawyer 
Per. Rel. Dept. 3; Traffic Dept. 3, 
4; Rec. Dept. 4; Lib. Council 3, 4; 
I. B. S. 4; Monogram 3; Hi-Y 2, 3, 
4; "Pine Whispers" 4; Board Mem. 
3; Ass't Sec. Student Body 3; Ten- 
nis 3. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page thirty-nine 




Mildred Pearl Thompson 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Marry A 

Doctor 

Schol. Dept. 2, 3; Lost And Found 

2; I. B. S. 4; Monogram 3; G. R. 

1, 2, 3, 4. 



Virginia Louise Vernon 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Win A Cer- 
tain Stage Actor 
San. Dept. 3; G. R. 1, 2. 3; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3. 

Rose Emma Wood 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Mrs. 
Sprinkle 
Rec. Dept. 3, 4; Lib. Council 3, 4; 
Board Mem. 2. 3; I. B. S. 4; Mono- 
gram 2; Cheerleader 4; G. R. 1, 2; 
Pres. 1. 2; "Pine Whispers" 3: Sr. 
Marshall 3. 



Evelyn Mae Tillmon 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Have A 
Happy Landing 
San. Dept. 2, 3: Schol. Dept. 1. 

Hubert Phillip Weir 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Marry For 

Love 
Lib. Council 3, 4; Schol. Dept. 2; 
Per. Rel. Dept 2; Band 4; Dram. 
Club 3. 

Ethel P. Wooten 

General, Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Wealthy 



William Larrick Travathan 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Play Foot- 
ball At State 
Walnut Cove 1; High Point 2; San. 
Dept. 3: Traffic Dept. 3, 4; Lib. 
Council 4; Monogram 3. 4; I. B. S. 
4;- Football 3, 4; Basketball 4. 



Rachel Estelle Whicker 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Learn Not 
To Blush 
Supt. Schol. Dept. 2; Per. Rel. Dept. 
3; Traffic Dept. 1, 2, 3, 4; Lib. 
Council 3; Lib. Page 1, 2, 3; I. B. 
S. 4; Monogram 1, 3; Hon. Club 2, 
3; V. Pres. Student Body 3. 



Mary Frances Wooten 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Chew The 
Wrinkles Out Of Chewing Gum 
Board Mem. 2, 3; Lib. Page 1, 2; 
Schol. Dept. 2; Monogram 2, 4; I. 
B. S. 4; G. R. 4; Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 
4. 



Page forty 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Clara Lucile Wyatt 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Grow Six 
Inches 
Supt. Traffic 3; Per. Rel. Dept. 2 
3, 4; Lib. Council 3, 4; G. R. 3, 
4; I. B. S. 4: Monogram 3; Cheer- 
Ieader4; Sr. Marshall 3; V. Pres. 
Student Body 4; Sec. Student Body 
2; Ass't Sec. Student Body 1. 

Wesley Lee Zimmerman 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A 
Success 
San. Dept. 4. 



Edna Lois Zimmerman 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Fine Feet 

Tall 
Schol. Dept. 3; San. Dept. 2; Mon- 
ogram 3; "Pine Whispers" 4- I. B 
S. 4; Dram. Club 1. 



Grady Lee Zimmerman, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be In The 
Army 
San. Dept. 2; I. B. S. 4. 



OTHER SENIORS 



i , 



Walter Lee Cook 

General Course 



Mildred Marie Hedgecock 

Commercial Course 



Clifton Pershing Dunnegan 

General Course 



William N. Shultz, Jr. 

General Course 



Ralph Lindsay Leonard 

General Course 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page forty-one 




*22=Ki*S*,.- 



CLASS POEM OF JUNE CLASS 

Annie Jarvis, Class Poet 



Laughters: 

A laugh is just like sunshine, 

It brightens every day; 
It tips the peak of life with light, 

And drives the clouds away. 

Knowledge: 

When unknown problems face us, 

Let knowledge answer loud, 

For knowledge is a priceless gift 

That makes our living proud. 

Thought: 

A thought before beginning 

The morn of every day; 
Will help us o'er the rocky parts, 

Along life's hard pathway. 

Rememberance: 

A pause — as we look back at school, 

When we sailed away from shore; 
With tear-dimmed eyes we wonder 

What the future has in store. 

Hope: 

When cherished goals defy us, 

Lets not be depressed; 

Without these things to try us, 

Life would lose its zest. 

Not what we seem, but what we do, 

Not what we dream, but what is true; 

These are the goals that shine like gems 
Bright stars in fortune's diadem! 



Page forty- two 



BLACK AND GOLD 




SUPERLATIVES OF JUNE CLASS 



MOST POPULAR 
Lucile Wyatt 
Ernest Shore 

MOST ATHLETIC 

Mildred Hedgecock 

David Doty 



WITTIEST 
Rosa Speaks 
Jack Simmons 

BEST-ALL-ROUND 

Nancy Fisher 
William Trevathan 

•MOST INTELLECTUAL 

Helen Swaim 

Everette Charles 



BIGGEST FLIRTS 

Rose Wood 

Ed Mendenhall 

BEST LOOKING 

Mary Leonard 
Hoyle Mann 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page forty-three 



.<*<L^ 




^2=^ik, 



HISTORY OF JUNE CLASS, 1937 

Everette Charles, Historian 



In September, 1933, South Junior High 
School had so many freshmen that the 
other students (and ourselves most of all, 
we thought) were crowded. As we think 
of ourselves, as we were four years ago, 
it seems that everyone of us was an avia- 
tor. (Boy! you should have seen us "fly" 
through the halls after having marched in 
line for seven long years! ) Since the 
word aviator seems to have described 
us, let us say that we were only student 
pilots at first. We began our study (not 
flying, but honest to goodness work) 
with Mr. J. M. Shields, as our principal, 
just as all other high school students 
have done, we did not realize what a 
fine faculty we had and how much we 
really liked them in spite of the difficult 
homework which they seldom failed to 
assign. 

Our first two years of high school are 
like a puzzle that cant be solved. We 
were divided among the twenty home 
rooms of the school without any rela- 
tionship whatsoever as freshmen or soph- 
omores. We did not even know each 
other's name. We are proud of the 
fact, however, that fifty members of 
graduation class served at least one term 
during his high school career as one or 
more of the "big four" officers of his 
class. It was during this lapse of time 
that our principal, Mr. Shields, retired 
in favor of Mr. K. G. Phillips. 

February, 1936, brought us together 
as the Junior Class of South High School. 
We then selected our sponsor, Miss Edna 
Higgins, and elected our officers: Lucile 
Wyatt, president; Ed Mendenhall, vice- 
president; Helen Swaim, secretary; and 
J. E. Tate, treasurer. Our outstanding 
social event of this semester was the Jun- 



ior-Senior Banquet, where we featured 
a genuine "wah-hoo" orchestra. We 
especially enjoyed this because we earned 
most of the expenses by selling candy at 
our basketball games. 

September of 1936 brought us together, 
we thought, as "the" Senior Class of 
South High School. But misfortune 
laughed at us again. There were so many 
of us that we could not get into one 
room. Therefore we divided and select- 
ed two sponsors: Miss Eleanor Cain 
and Miss Margaret McLean. Our 
officers were elected in due time: Roy 
Bovender, president; Ralph Leonard, vice 
president; Lucile Wyatt, secretary. As 
our president could not be in both home 
rooms at one time, we elected two chair- 
men: J. E. Tate and Ed Mendenhall of 
Miss Cain's and Miss McLean's rooms 
respectively. We liked these fine offic- 
ers so much that we decided to keep them 
for both semesters. 

During that year our social life was 
by no means neglected. The two most 
outstanding events were the Masquerade 
Party and the Junior-Senior Banquet. 
We really enjoyed the latter because 
of what it meant to us. 

We were greatly pleased at the begin- 
ning of the second semester because we 
were permitted to have the library for 
our home room. As Miss McLean found 
it necessary to leave, we selected Mrs. 
Lucia Blackwood to take her place. 

When that year came to a close, we 
had proved what we could do. We had 
shown our stability to Miss Stephenson 
through M. O. S.; Miss Glasgow made 
us observers of America each Friday 
through the "American Observer". 



Page forty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 



-^j-xrf-^.,. 



PROPHECY OF JUNE CLASS 

Lois Zimmerman, Prophet 



It has been said that if you stand on 
Times Square, you will eventually see 
someone you know. As I am an in- 
quisitive and doubtful person, I one day 
in the spring of 1947, endeavored to vis- 
it Times Square and prove or disprove 
this statement. 

I had stood on the corner for sixty 
seconds when I felt a hearty slap on the 
back. Turning, I found Hoyle Mann — 
most recent explanations "why women's 
hearts beat faster." It seems that Hoyle 
is in New York on a visit before ap- 
pearing in "Love and Learn" with Mary 
Leonard. Hoyle explained that Annie 
Jarvis is the author of "Love and Learn", 
a best seller. 

He gave me the low-down on Rever- 
end Walter Cook who is now in Holly- 
wood trying to convince the actors that 
his way is best. His wife is Agnes Mc- 
Nair. Norma Minish, Nancy Fisher, 
and Ruth Hege are members of Brother 
and Sister Cook's choir. 

Soon Ed Mendenhall and Rose Wood 
came by. Naturally, Ed hollers, "Hey" 
and stops to tell of his job as publicity 
manager for the Paradise Cafe where 
Rose sings. He tells of celebraties who 
visit there, such as LeRoy Peebles, man- 
ager of Hi-De-Ho Revue; W. }. Dillon, 
his star juggler; Ethel Wooten, owner of 
The Swank, New York's best dress shop. 
As he kept talking to me, I heard from 
almost everyone in my senior graduating 
class of 1937. 

Charles Simmons and Farris Eddinger 
invented a weight reducer. The slim and 
lovely Josephine Kreegar is proof of its 
success. 

Ralph Leonard is the leader and 
"Grandpa" of a Hill-billy Band. "Ari- 
zona Al (Everette Charles), "Montana 
Mont" (Cecil Stewart), and "Wyoming 
Will" (Hubert Weir) are his helpers. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Tate (Margaret 
Bauguss) are members of Chicago's 



smart young set. Mr. Tate holds a po- 
sition in the First National Bank. His 
secretary is Miss Margaret Smith. 

In Detroit, we find Mr. and Mrs. Da- 
vid Doty. David is a star football player 
with the Detroit Tigers. Mrs. Doty 
(Alice Johnson) is his manager and says, 

We won't play for less than $25,000 a 
year." C. E. Gordon and Ernest Shore 
are also playing with the Tigers. 

Back in New York, we find Rosa 
Speaks, Mildred Hedgecock, and Mary 
Frances Wooten modeling latest fashions 
in women's clothes. 

In their home city (Winston -Salem), 
we find Lucille Wyatt and Helen Swaim 
teaching young citizens that one and one 
equals four. They visit Gladys Brown 
at her modernistic beauty shop often. 

If you desire a house you'd probably 
go to Collins Real Estate Agency where 
Mr. W. A. Collins, Jr. will satisfy you 
with the aid of Evelyn Tillmon, his as- 
sistant. 

Jack Simmons has at last "stooped and 
conquered." He is a farmer and wins 
many prizes with his large, perfectly 
formed squashes. His competitor for 
awards is Grady Zimmerman. 

Roy Bovender and Randall Manning 
are salesmen for the Windsor Candy 
Company. 

In Washington, D. C. we find Irene 
Edman as a dignified Senatoress from 
North Carolina. 

Corrie Ferguson and Mildred Floyd 
are typists in the government offices 
there. 

William Bowers announces programs 
over W X Z, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Across the Atlantic, is Clois Renigar 
singing over a London Broadcasting Sta- 
tion; Lucy Lee Joyce and Nancy Davis 
are globe trotters. 

In China, you'll find John Crouch tell- 
ing American citizens there what happen- 

( Continued on page 222) 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page forty-five 




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n 



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J'^)*-*. 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JUNE CLASS, 1937 



Section I 
We, the June graduating class of 
nineteen hundred and thirty-seven, know- 
ing that our life as a class will soon cease, 
and wishing to express our appreciation 
to those who have labored with us so 
diligently, and who have been associated 
with us daily, do hereby will and be- 
queath our treasures, and privileges, to 
wit. 

Section II 
Item I. To Mr. Phillips and Miss Hall, 
we wish to express our appreciation 
for their sympathetic understanding of 
our difficult problems. 

Item II. To the Juniors, we will the 
honor of being dignified during their 
final year and the front seats in assem- 
bly. 

Item III. To the student body, we leave 
honored traditions, such as athletics, 
various societies, and the journalistic, 
public speaking, and dramatic activi- 
ities, and the art of studying in general. 

Item IV. To our beloved sponsors, Miss 
Eleanor Cain and Miss Margaret Mc- 
Lean, our admiration and friendship. 
It is with profound sorrow that we 
must be separated. 

Section III 

Item I. To the Faculty, we leave our 
sincere gratitude for their efforts in 
attempting to increase our wisdom. 

Item II. To Miss Moselle Stephenson, 
a life size portrait of English writers 
from Anglo-Norman period through 
the age of Queen Victoria in the hope 
that they will haunt her as they have 
haunted us. 

Item HI. To Miss Hazel Baity, a model 
set of pupils for her library periods. 

Item V. To Miss Clara Tiller, an e- 
quipped auditorium where her dramatic 
classes may rehearse. 

Item V. To Mr. Bunn, Mr. Smith, and 
Mr. Griffith, our sincere hope that their 
teams will slaughter North. 



Item VI. To Miss Daisy Lee Glasgow, 
a southern plantation near the city of 
Atlanta. 

Section IV 

Item I. To Dort Payne, we bequeath 
William Bowers' ability to argue, 
which always has the power to infur- 
iate his teachers and get their minds 
off the lesson. 

Item II. To Raymond Wood, Everette 
Charles leaves his scholarly ability, in 
hope that Raymond will pass one sub- 
ject. 

Item III. To Jane Sink, Josephine Kree- 
gar leaves her plumpness and size, 
pointing out the fact that it. takes a 
person of this caliber to be "Best -all- 
around." 

Item IV. To Francine Carter, Edwin 
Mendenhall leaves a reasonable exact 
facsimile of his red hair and the dis- 
tinguished and outstanding qualities he 
has. 

Item V. To Doris Bell, Rose Wood 
leaves her title of the biggest flirt. 

Item VI. To Kathryn Mendenhall, Ruth 
Hege leaves her Latin book in hopes 
that Kathryn will learn something 
other than "Ego amo te." 

Item VII. To Jesse Trevathan, Hoyle 
Mann wills his "good looks." 

Item VIII. To all future class presi- 
dents, Roy Bovender leaves his ability 
to solve class problems successfully. 

Item IX. To Virgie Flowers, Lois Zim- 
merman wills her journalistic abilities. 

Item X. To Janice Garwood, Nancy 
Fisher leaves her (strong) body and 
athletic tendencies. 

Item XI. To Billy Hunter, Swanson 
Roberts leaves his height. 

Item XII. To the football team, we will 
Roy Bovender's, David Doty's, Hoyle 
Mann's, Ernest Shore's, and Bill Tre- 
vanthan's that last one yard which is 
hard to get. 

(Continued on page 213) 



Page forty-six 



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JUNIOR CLASS 



1 IB CLASS 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page forty-seven 




SOPHOMORES 



FRESHMEN 



Page forty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




c^fetl<jltl&± 



' ■■■ . ' 











SOUTH HIGH STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Doris Davis President '36 

Lucile Wyatt !__ Vice President '36 and '37 

Anne Fort Secretary '36 

Ed Mendenhall Assistant Secretary '36 President '37 

Helen Swaim Secretary '37 

Tom Shore Assistant Secretary '37 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page fifty-one 




CO 

H 

W 
Q 

W 
E- 

w 

CO 




CHEERLEADERS 

Lucile Wyatt, Rose Wood, Ed Mendenhall, Evelyn Caudle 

DEBATERS 

Bennett Noell, Helen Swaim, Erma Joyner. Chester Bovender, Joe Gallen, William Bowers, J. E. Tate, John Crouch. 

Mr. Authur Steere, Miss Daisy Lee Glasqow 
BLACK AND GOLD Page fifty-three 




BAND 



DRAMATIC CLASSES 



Page fifty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




LIBRARY STAFF 



Alspaugh, Rebecca 
Barrington, Ruth 
Bell, Doris 
Bodenheimer, Dot 
Bovender, Chester 
Bodenheimer, Marshall 
Braddock, Frances 
Braddock, Pauline 
Brannon, Ruth 
Brewer, Roy 
Campbell, Hannah 
Caudle, Evelyn 
Clodfelter, Bernice 
Coe, Annie Fay 
Cook, Margaret 
Cranford, Roy 
Craver, Foil 
.Crouch, John 
Donnell, Carrie 
Doty, David 
Eddinger, Farris 
Ellege, Frances 
Ervin, Louise 



Miss Hazel Baity, Librarian 

Everhart, Drucilla 
Fishel, James 
Forcum, Marguerite 
Gallen, Joe 
Harrold, Frances 
Hayes, Betty 
Hayes, Elizabeth 
Heath, Louise 
Hedgecock, Louise 
Hinshaw, J. T. 
Jarvis, Annie 
Jarvis, George 
Jarvis, Mozelle 
Johnson, Edith 
Kimel, Nancy 
Lawrence, Elizabeth 
Leach, Dorothy 
Leonard, Mary 
Lentz, Edna 
Linville, Virginia 
Long, Dorothy 
Lynch, Garnette 



Mann, Nancy 
McCall, Bill 
Mc Mahan, Marie 
Metz, Nadine 
Mickey, Martha Gray 
Orrell, Richard 
Poole, Ruth 
Rhodes, Margaret 
Simmons, Charles 
Simmons, Margaret 
Sink, Bernice 
Stafford, Florence 
Swaim, Helen 
Tate, J. E. 
Weaver, Garnette 
Welch, Annie Lee 
Welch, Estelle 
West, Wilburn 
Whicker, Jack 
Whicker, Rachel 
Wooten, Ethel 
Wyatt, Lucile 
Yokley, Dilworth 



I i 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page fifty- five 





BOYS FOOTBALL 



BOYS BASKETBALL 



Page fifty-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 




GIRLS BASEBALL 



BOYS BASEBALL 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Pa fl e fifty 




GIRLS BASKETBALL 



GIRLS SOCCER 



Page fifly-eig!i( 



BLACK AND GOLD 






v_- 




dVoxiri cJjiak School 




Dedication 



To our principal, Mr. Robert S. Haltiwanger, who has 
been a loyal friend and counselor of our high school days, 
we, the members of the 1937 Graduating Class of North 
High School, gratefully dedicate this issue of the Black and 

Gold. 



-o^tfr-'"^-.; 



k-^Xi*lfc.^- 



NORTH HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 

Robert S. Haltiwanger, B. S., M. A., Principal 

University of North Carolina, Davidson, Duke 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR 

Mildred Ferguson, Secretary 

CAFETERIA 

Bernice Martin Cumberland, B. S. 

Salem College 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 
Carrie Meek Dungan, Head of English Department 

Farmvillc Teachers' College, Columbia University 

Nettie Boggs Chappell Sadye Marcelle Penry, A. B. 

Farmville Teachers' College Salem College 

Anna Louise Mock, A. B. Carolyn Virginia Nash, A. B. 

Salem College Agnes Scott College 

Annie Lee Singletary, A. B. 

Woman's College, University of North Carolina 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 
Roy Archibald Swaringen, M. Ed., A. B. 

Duke University 

Hortense Reid Bankston Sarah Anderson 

Coordinate College, University of Ga. Salem College 

Ray Weathers, A. B. 

University of North Carolina 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT 
H. M. Jernigan, B. S., Head of Industrial Arts Department 

North Carolina State College 

H. B. Duke, B. S. 

Clemson College 

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 
Nancy Ruth Carter, A. B. 

Salem College 

SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
R. F. Johnson, A. B„ M. A. 

Davidson College, University ,of North Carolina 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Maude Hale, A. B., Head of Commercial Department 

Bowling Green College 

Alma Dee Woodmore, A. B. Mary Nicholson, A. B. 

Bowling Green College Bowling Green College 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
Dorothy Wolff Bunn, B. S. 

Guilford College 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
Flavella Louise Stockton, A. B., Organ Diploma 

Salem College 

LIBRARY 
Marguerite Smith, A. B., L. S., Librarian 

Woman's College of U. of N. C Western Reserve University 



Page sixty two 



BLACK AND GOLD 




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NORTH HIGH JANUARY CLASS OFFICERS 

Louise Lineback President Jean Simpson Prophet 

Bill Knott Vice President Louise Lineback Poet 

Jean Simpson Secretary Bill Knott Testator 

Alma Brooks Treasurer Octa Cooke Historian 

Jo Ann Wilson Mascot Miss Carrie Dungan Adviser 

Colors: Red and White Flower: Red Rose 

Motto: "They also serve who only stand and wait." 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page sixty-seven 




Alma Brooks 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire-— To Travel 
Alderman 1; Baseball 2; Soccer 2; 
Lib. Page 1, 2; Horn. Ec. Club 4; 
G. R. 4; Class Treas. 4; News- 
paper Staff 4; Ass. Ed. Black and 
Gold. 4. 

C. F. Cooke, Jr. 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Help 

To The World 
Hi-Y Club 2, 4; Boosters Club 3, 
4; Monogram Club 3, 4; Football 
3, 4; Baseball 4; Track 4; Orches- 
tra 2; Science Club 2. 



Octa Leach Cook 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A 
Secretary 
G. R. I. 2, 4; Lib. Page 1. 2, 3; 
Baseball 3; Orchestra 1; Horn. Ec. 
Club 3; Boosters Club 3; Office 
Page 4. 



Milton Brady Byrd 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Destroy All 

Cosmetics 
Museum 1, 2; Science Club V-Pres. 
2; Lit. Soc. 3; Stage Manager 3. 4; 
Newspaper 3, 4; Literary Society 
Pres. 4; Stamp Club Pres. 4; Foot- 
ball Captain 4; "Patch-work Quilt" 
5: "Young and Healthy" 5. 



Estelle Kimel 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Destroy All 

History Books 
South High 1, 2. 3; G. R. 2. 3. 4; 
Board Member 2; Library Council 
3; "Patchwork Quilt" 4; Horn. Ec. 
Club 4; Office Force 3, 4. 



Page sixty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



II 




William M. Knott, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Rate Along 

With Guy Lombardo 
Alderman 1, 4; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Baseball 3; Hi-Y Club 2; 
Fire-Chief 4. 

Margaret Louise Lineback 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Liked 
Horn. Ec. Club 2; Clerk of Court 3; 
judge of Court 4; Class President 
4; G. R. Pres. 4; Office Page 4; 
Lib. Page 1, 2. 



Wilburn Manuel 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire*— To Be Mae 

West's Elevator Boy 

Boosters' Club 4; Hi-Y Club 3. 4. 



Fletcher Fulp 

Commercial Course 



Opal Marie Lancaster 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A 
Stenographer 
G. R. 1. 2, 3. 4; Pres. 2; V. Pres. 
3; Excelsior Club 4, 5; Horn. Ec. 
Club 3, 4; Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Necdlecraft Club 1; Alderman 3; 
Etiquette Club 1, 2; Pres. 2. 



Jean Frances Simpson 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Good 

Columnist 
G. R. 4; Office Page 4; Clerk of 
Court 4; Hon. Soc. 4; Class Sec. 
4; Newspaper Staff 3, 4. 



• I 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page sixty-nine 



^ag^ccS^ 




<2a=*^5*._ 



CLASS POEM 



Our life is a book, and only we 

Have power to write therein. 
The days we live are its pages; 

Our character — the pen. 
The cover bound about it is made 

By God's own hand. 
We're placed upon the shelf of life 

To await His command. 
And when our book is opened 

What will the reader see? 
A life of service, faith and love? 

Or will the answer be, 
"The writing here is not very clear; 

I see no good at all." 
The book is closed, the reader gone, 

You're placed against the wall. 
Yes, the reader's gone. He travels on 

To find books more worthwhile, 
No time for you, whose pages few 

Are unclean, blotted, vile. 
The book he seeks is rich and full. 

No scantiness, no scrawl, 
One which remains unblemished 

The masterpiece of all. 
So, Graduates, may we make our book 

One to be much read, 
One whose pages we'll open wide 

Proudly and unafraid. 
With our high school days the preface 

Of our book comes to an end. 
The living chapters, small or great, 

In the future must be penned. 




Page seventy 



BLACK AND GOLD 



1 




I 



I 



SUPERLATIVES OF JANUARY CLASS 
IDEAL GIRL IDEAL BOY 



The ideal girl of the Senior Class 

Would include them all it seems 

We'd select the best trait of each lass 

To make up the girl of our dreams. 

From Opal Lancaster we'd take her eyes 

And choose Louise Lineback's hair, 

Jean Simpson's intelligence would make her wise 

And Octa's complexion is fair. 

Estelle Kimel could donate her ready wit, 

We'd get teeth from Alma Brooks 

And Alma's figure would make a hit 

Even in the movie books. 



The ideal boy. on the other hand 

Would have eyes like M. B. Byrd 

As for wit, we'd choose "Red" Manuel's brand 

As about the best that we've heard 

From C. F. Cooke we'd select the physique 

And from M. B., intelligence. 

The hair of Bill Knott would best suit our sheik 

While C. F.'s teeth have most brilliance, 

"Red's" disposition would complete the list, 

Plus Bill Knott's versatibility 

Such a composite boy we couldn't resist 

With this character and this ability. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page seventy-one 




^k.^<3k, I (17 



*?-i^i**.,. 



HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA HIGH SCHOOLS 

Octa Cook, Historian 



Since this is the hundredth anniver- 
sary of the public schools of North Caro- 
lina, we of North High have chosen the 
topic "HISTORY OF NORTH CARO- 
LINA SCHOOLS" instead of "HIST- 
ORY OF OUR CLASS". 

The first form of public education in 
North Carolina was that provided for 
the destitute orphans. Various citizens 
promised to take orphans and teach them 
a trade and to read and write along with 
other children in the family. 

In 1776 the first free school was estab- 
lished in Newbern. It was financed by 
a one cent tax on each gallon of rum 
carried up the Neuse River. 

Although the original Constitution of 
1776 had made it possible through the 
legislature to establish schools, nothing 
was done until 1825 when the act creat- 
ing the Literary Fund was passed. The 
principal support was a combination of 
local taxation and income from the Lit- 
erary Fund. 

In 1850 Calvin H. Wiley introduced 
into the House of Commons a bill to 
provide for the appointment of a Superin- 
tendent of Common Schools. In 1852, 
Wiley was appointed the first Superin- 
tendent of Common Schools. 

Wiley's task as the first superinten- 
dent was not easy. In spite of all the 
difficulties, Calvin H. Wiley went for- 
ward and out of apparent chaos built 
the foundation of the present education 
system in North Carolina. 

Probably no better view of the educa- 
tional status at the inception of the state 
school system is given anywhere than 
that presented by Wiley in his first ann- 
ual report in 1853. 

The children of all grades and classes, 
in Wiley's day, were all together in one 
class. The teacher taught the children 
out of any books they had. Wiley did 
not like this idea so he wrote a book for 



the children. The children were put into 
classes after this book was written. 

Wiley wished to establish a school in 
each section of the country. The people 
who had been sending their children to 
boarding school gave money to these 
public schools. By this method all the 
children in that section of the country 
were able to go to school. 

Although the statistical data contained 
in this first State Superintendent's report 
are very meagre compared to a report 
of the present Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, it does show certain inter- 
esting facts concerning the progress of 
schools and education in the state. 

In 1840, there were 2 colleges and 
universities, HI academies, and 14,937 
other schools. There were 56,609 whites 
over 20 years of age who could not read 
and write. 

In 1850, the enrollment had increased 
greatly; there were 100,591 children en- 
rolled in the common schools. The re- 
port of 1853 showed 177,629 children 
had enrolled in 70 counties, and 85,322 
children taught. The average salary per 
month was from $9 to $36, and very few 
of the teachers were properly licensed. 

Many serious difficulties had been en- 
countered, and notwithstanding these, and 
notwithstanding the imperfect organiza- 
tion of the system, and a partial neglect 
of the State, the schools have made a 
continued though slow progress. 

The following paragraph might well 
be said today; it would be just as appli- 
cable as it must have been when Wiley 
was superintendent: 

"Our position is not high, but in no 
country on earth can greater industrial, 
commercial, and educational progress be 
made in the next years than it is in our 
power easily to accomplish for North 
Carolina." 

(Continued on page 197) 



Page seventy-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 



II 



-o*s^^£^ 




«£2=*^2fc._ 



PROPHECY OF JANUARY CLASS, 1937 

Jean Simpson 



The scene is the colossal, magnificent, 
stupendous, gigantic World's Fair in 
New York city, and the time, a few 
years after the present. 

Amid the noise that always issues from 
a Fair midway, we find cautiously walk- 
ing along, stopping every few minutes, 
and peering about, Mrs. David Lanier, 
formerly Miss Estelle Kimel, who seems 
to have lost Mr. Lanier some way or 
other. As she looks about she sees walk- 
ing along a very quaint figure — quaint 
in that she is walking slowly as if in a 
daze. Estelle recognizes her as Louise 
Lineback. Louise, it seems, has become a 
very famous poet and is composing a 
poem about the glamour of the midway. 

As they stand talking they look up at 
a ferris wheel and see on the very top 
seat Jean Simpson with a spy glass— of 
all things— to her eyes. She's standing 
upright in her seat. "Whoops!" Louise 
and Estelle both exclaim, "She's lost her 
balance, she is falling. No, she caught 
herself." The ride stops and Jean comes 
toward them. "Well, well, well!" she ex- 
claims, "fancy meeting you here — I'd love 
to talk but you see I have to make a 
deadline at twelve and its nine now— 
let's see, oh, yes— You see I'm a columist 
and you just get ooddles of things here 
and I've just got to rush. So long!" And 
off she dashes leaving two breathless 
persons behind. 

And just then there comes into sight 
a Paris poodle dog, followed by a long 
chain attached to— of all people— Alma 
Brooks. 

"Girls," she says, "I'm delighted to see 
you. How do you like Gertie? I picked 
him up on one of my trips abroad. You 
see I'm very fond of travel." 

The three friends, deciding to see 
something, together, enter a huge tent. 
In the middle of the ring, clad in a scar- 
let, blue, orange, and green suit is Wil- 



burn Manuel, the most famous clown of 
the century. 

Looking around the ring they see Mr. 
and Mrs. C. F. Cooke. Mrs. Cooke is 
raising a racket that is drowning out all 
the other noises in the tent. Mr. Cooke 
is looking about very sheepishly. Louise 
Alma, and Estelle hold their sides and 
exclaim, "A perfect hen-pecked hus- 
band." 

Leaving the tent, they run into Opal 
Lancaster. Opal is a picture out of a 
fashion magazine. She tells them she is 
a fashion expert in a store and gives the 
name of Saks on Fifth Avenue. 

They wander on, and who comes into 
sight but Octa Cooke. Octa has a very 
business-like look about her, so they are 
not very much surprised to hear her say 
she is a secretary, but when she says 
she's the secretary to the Mayor of New 
York they fairly gasp for breath. 

They enter a huge exhibit hall of a 
certain tobacco firm and find one of the 
directors talking about the merits of good 
tobacco in a cigarette. And who is the 
director, but Bill Knott. Bill blushed 
when they asked him how he attained 
success and said, "I owe it all to my 
English teacher, Miss Dungan." 

Hearing an exciting commotion, they 
rush to see what has occurred. They 
find a group of female fans grouped about 
Romeo M. B. Byrd, the idol of the sil- 
ver screen. M. B. waves a wan hand of 
salute as he is fairly borne down the lane 
by avid autograph-hunters. 

Just then Mr. Lanier rushes up and Es- 
telle gives him one of those wifey stares 
which mean, "Just wait 'till I get you 
home," and the friends part and go their 
respective ways. 

The stars twinkle in the same way, 
calm and undisturbed, as if this famous 
meeting had never occurred— as indeed 
it may never! 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page seventy-three 



I! 




^-^ste-^fc* 



Jb>^fe, 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT JANUARY CLASS 1937 

Bill Knott 



We, the members of the January, 1937, 
graduating class of North High, being 
of strong minds and character, having 
been strengthened by our absolute 
knowledge of history, do hereby pub- 
lish our last will and testament: 

Article I 
To members of the faculty we express 
our sincere thanks for patience in help- 
ing us during our stay at North High, 
and we do graciously forgive them for 
the headaches and homework they have 
given us. 

Article II 
To the class of June, 1937, we leave 
our athletic ability which was the back- 
bone of our noble class. 

Article HI 
We give and bequeath to our re- 
spected and beloved principal a twig of 
forget-me-nots, so that when teachers 
are needed, the class of January, 1937 
will be remembered. 

Article IV 
To John Wooten we sadly bequeath 
that art of talking just as much as Flet- 
cher Fulp, and we trust that John will be 
excused from just as many classes on 
account of it. 

Article V 
To Lillian Currin we will, with keen 
joy, Red Manuel's penetrating under- 
standing of literature. 

Article VI 
We will to the entire class of June, 



1937, Estelle Kimel's excellent motto: 
"To ask questions is the way to find 
out." 

Article VII 
We leave to M. B. Byrd's desk a 
long and much needed rest. 

Article VIII 
We bestow, grant, and convey to 
Moir Lancaster, C. F. Cook's Dancing 
Hall, which has been a great asset to 
him in teaching the "fair ones" the pro- 
per way to dance. 

Article IX 
To the class of June, 1937, we will our 
senior dignity. May they wear it well! 

Article X 
We joyfully will and bequeath to the 
class of June, 1937, all of our dear fac- 
ulty who will always cherish fond mem- 
ories of us, and we sincerely believe that 
they will change their disposition for the 
better toward the next senior class. 

We hereby constitute and appoint the 
Golden Dragon of North High sole 
executor of this our last will and test- 
ament made under our hand and seal, 
this the 19th day of November in the 
year 1937 in the city of Winston-Salem, 
N. C, in the County of Forsyth. 

Bill Knott, Testator 

Witnesses: 

Shirley Temple 
Popeye's Pappy 



Page seventy-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 



1 




JUNE CLASS OFFICERS 

Raymond Holder President Lawrence HighfllL. 

Ruth Landingham Vice-President Mary Bennett 

Doris Tucker Sec'y. & Treasurer David West 

Anna Frances Miller. Mascot Frances Newsom__ 

Mr. Roy A. Swaringen Adviser 

Colors: Pink and White 
Flower: Pink Carnation 
Motto: Let us lead while others follow. 



.Historian 
-Testator 
_ -Prophet 
Poet 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page seventy-five 




J. D. Allgood, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Capture 

Dot's Heart 
Police 1, 2, 3, 4; Excelsior 3, '. 
Hi-Y 4. 



Sara Barrett 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Date Robert 

Taylor 
G.R. 1, 2, 3; Newspaper 4; Home 
Ec. 4; Lib. Page 1, 2, 3. 



Mary Bennett 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make The 
Olympic Tiddly-Winks Team 
Clemmons 1, 2, 3; Soccer 4; Basket- 
ball 4; "Young And Healthy" 4. 



Paul Cheek 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel 
Football 3, 4; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Base- 
ball 3; Police 1, 2, 3; Lit. Soc. 4. 



W. Lawrence Highfill 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Be Morally 

Rich 
Alderman 3: Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4; Ex- 
celsior 3, 4; "Young And Healthy" 
4; Class Pres. 3; Basketball 3, 4; 
Tennis 3, 4: Newspaper 3, 4; H. S. 
Chorus 4. 



Alice Grace Darden 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Ride Up Mt. 

Everest In A T-Model Ford 
G. R. 1, 2. 3; Home Ec. 3, 4; Bo- 
osters 4; Newspaper 4; Lib. Page 1. 
2,3. 



Doris Holden 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Sing With 

Benny Goodman's Orchestra 
Greensboro 1, 2; Lib. Page 3, 4; 
Soccer 4; Excelsior 4; Boosters 4; 
Office Page 3; Basketball 3; Ama- 
teur 4; Tennis 3. 



Melvin Fogg 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Win An Ar- 
gument With Mr. Johnston 
Florence, S. C. 1, 2, 3; Hi-Y 4; 
"Young and Healthy" 4; H. S. 
Chorus 4; Basketball 4. 



Robert Raymond 
Holder, Jr. 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Learn How 

To Truck 
Class Pres. 1, 3; Basketball 4; 
Capt. 4; Boosters 4; Sec. 4: Excel- 
sior 4: Tennis 2, 3; Baseball 3; Hi- 
Y 2, 3; Police 1, 2. 



Page seventy-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Moir Clifton Lancaster 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An Auto- 
mobile Test Driver 
Football 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Ten- 
nis 2, 3, 4. 

Frances M. Newsom 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Truck With 

"Stink" When He Learns 
Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4; Pres. 4; Boos- 
ters 4; Pres. 4: Lib. Page 4; Pres. 
4; Cheerleader 3. 4; Excelsior 3. 4: 
V. Pres. 3; Treas. 4; "Mixed Dat- 
es" 4; "Young and Healthy" 4; 
Tennis 3; Soccer 4; Basketball 4; 
Alderman 1, 2; Class Pres. 2; Lit. 
Soc. 3: V. Pres. 3; Glee Club 1. 
4: Editor-in-Chief PINE WHISP- 
ERS 4; Newspaper 2, 3. 

Edith Stack 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Spend An 

"Evening In Paris" 
Basketball 1, 2; G. R. 4; Baseball 
2: Lib. Page 1, 2. 3; Home Ec. 3, 
4. 



Ruth Landingham 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Flirt With 

George Raft 
Excelsior 4; Office Page 3, 4; Lib. 
Page 1, 2. 3, 4; Class Pres. 3; Lost 
and Found 3, 4; Newspaper 3. 4; 
Baseball 3; Soccer 4; Boosters 4; 
Lit. Soc. 3; Police 3. 



Doris Tucker 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go To a 

Dance In Shorts 
Mineral Springs 1. 2; Soccer 3, 4; 
Basketball 3, 4; Baseball 3; Cheer- 
leader 4; Excelsior 4; Boosters 3, 4. 



Marie Miller 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Jazz The 
Wedding March Like Martha Raye 
Reynolds 3; Police 2, 3; H. S. Cho- 
rus 4. 

G. Gray Shermer 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An 
Athlete 
Mayor 4; Class Pres. 1, 3; Basket- 
ball. 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Boos- 
ters 4; Monogram 3, 4; Pres. 3, 4; 
Excelsior 4; Alderman 2, 3, 4; Lit. 
Soc. 4; H. S. Chorus 4; Police 
Com. 3; Glee 1, 2; "Mixed Dates" 
3: "Young and Healhy" 4; Hi-Y 
2, 3: Football 3; Co-Capt. 3. 

David West 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Out-dance 

Fred Astaire 
Basket Ball 2. 3, 4; Football 3; Hi- 
Y 2; Monogram; Alderman 2. 



Clarice Florena Bruce 

Commercial Course 

BLACK AND GOLD 



OTHER SENIORS 
J. T. Tilley, Jr. 

General Course 



Margaret O'Neal 

General Course 

Page seventy-seven 



I! 



^SWc^S^ 




^i-"V*fc.- 



CLASS POEM OF JUNE CLASS 
& 

Ever Onward! This our motto. 

With hearts flung in hope and expectation 

Undaunted spirits soar in exaltation 

As we cry, "Ever Onward!" 

Ever Onward! This our motto. 
Each classmate impelled by will to overcome 
Youthful purpose conquers when 'tis venturesome 
So we strive Ever Onward. 

Ever Onward! This our motto. 
Each resolves a higher goal is yet to be achieved 
And rewards by brave and happy hearts to be received 
As we press Ever Onward. 

Ever Onward! This our motto. 
Reluctantly, North High, we bid farewell to thee 
Yet offer you our praise and thanks eternally 
As we move Ever Onward. 




Page seventy-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



I 




JUNE CLASS SUPERLATIVES 



MOST ORIGINAL 

Doris Holden 

Raymond Holder 

MOST ATHLETIC 
Mary Bennett 
Gray Shermer 



BEST LOOKING 
Doris Tucker 
Moir Lancaster 

BIGGEST FLIRTS 
Ruth Landingham 
Raymond Holder 



MOST INTELLECTUAL 
Frances Newsom 
Lawrence Highfill 

BEST DISPOSITION 

Clarice Bruce 

David West 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page seventy-nine 



^>*SW><=-C£a»i 




<22=*i*ifc..— 



HISTORY OF JUNE CLASS, 1937 

Lawrence Highfill 



In the ninth moon of the year 1933 
a flock of young red-skins began a se- 
ries of battles which were to last four 
long, but glorious years. The event was 
not as colorful as it might have been be- 
cause our North High tribe was very 
young, and we were in need of warriors. 
So, earlier than is customary, we were 
allowed to associate with the older mem- 
bers of our tribe and began training for 
the battles in which we were to partici- 
pate in the near future. 

Yes, at last we had the opportunity 
to become heroes in warfare. Upon 
reaching this stage we were fortunate 
in not being looked down on as most 
freshmen are, because others not so far 
advanced as we, were present to receive 
the abuse and intolerance usually suf- 
fered by the freshmen. 

Although we weren't thrust onto the 
warpath in that first year, valuable 
knowledge was stored away for future 
use. 

The dull winter and bright spring of 
the second year faded into the past and 
we were recognized with a little more 
respect. It was in this year that Mr. 
R. S. Haltiwanger was made chief of the 
tribe, to lead us along the trails of learn- 
ing. 

In the third year of our career we 
selected Raymond Holder as leader of 
our rising-in-fame bloody division of the 
North High Indians. Our struggle in 
the massacres of Typing and Shorthand 
are very distinctly remembered by those 
taking part as highlights in the Junior 
year. However, several triumphants re- 
turned to camp after the Battle of Typ- 
ing with 50 words a minute swinging on 
their belts — victims of skillfull use of the 
scalping knife. 

Being unable to prevent the progress 
of time, we found our fourth year, 



known as the senior year, become a re- 
ality. Mr. R. A. Swaringen was given 
our division, to guide and direct our ac- 
tions, and again Big Chief Raymond Hol- 
der was chosen our active leader. 

Our continual advance reached its 
peak and we furnished a rightful ma- 
jority of the tribe's leading figures. Faith- 
fully, we upheld the tradition of seniors 
to be dignified and all-commanding. At 
times we probably defined too radically 
senior privileges. Nevertheless we met 
the increased responsibilities with all en- 
ergy and competence of famed Indians 
on the warpath. The social climax of 
the year was the delightful Junior-Senior. 
Not in the entire History of American 
Indians is there an account of so many 
and such beautifully attired squaws as 
were assembled at this occasion. 

Perhaps the most famous and bitter 
battle during this term was the Battle 
of American History on the Diploma 
River. Many bear scars of this battle, 
which will be long remembered and cher- 
ished, as precious jewels of knowledge. 
It almost made pale faces of us all. 

Some of those attaining especial fame 
in active warfare were: Frances New- 
som, editor of Pine Whispers and Pres- 
ident of National Honor Society; Ray- 
mond Holder, captain of 1936-37 basket- 
ball team; Moir Lancaster, captain of 
1935-36 football team; and Gray Sher- 
mer, mayor during the 1936-37 school 
term. 

Not at all unboastfully, we wish to 
express our extreme sympathy for our 
fair tribe after we are gone. But oh, 
we forgot; our superb knowledge and 
ability were received through the excel- 
lent training of dear old Alma Mater; 
our teachers, the medicine men; and the 
benificence of the Great Spirit. 



Page eighty 



BLACK AND GOLD 




«£a=x*^— 



PROPHECY OF JUNE CLASS, 1937 

David West 



It is 1950 and the annual meetinq of 
the Merchants' Association is beinq held 
in the ball room of the Robert E. Lee 
Hotel. As we look around the room, 
we find a number of prominent business 
men. The first one we notice is Gray 
Shermer smoking his "left over" cam- 
paign cigar. As our eves wander around 
we see Raymond Holder, the carpenter 
representative, seated in a very beauti- 
ful chair. The new mavor of our fair 
city slaps Raymond on the shoulder. 

"Well, if it isn't "Stink" Holder. 
What are you doing here?" 

"Why, haven't you heard," laughs 
Raymond, "that North High has eighteen 
representatives present at our meeting?" 

"Now let me see," studies Gray, "if 
I can remember any of my old class 
mates. There's Moir Lancaster, the gro- 
ceryman, }. D. Allgood, owner of Kress 
department store, }. T. Tilley, bookkeep- 
er for Hollywood's leading cowboy- 
Buck Jones, and Melvin Fogg, clown at 
the State Theatre." 

"That seems to be all I can remember 
right now. Do you remember any, 
Stink?" 

"Weli, now let me see," replies 
Stink. "There's Grace Darden, author 
of 'Gone With The School, and Law- 
rence Highfill, the shoeman who seems 
to be having trouble in finding shoes that 
fit his feet." 

"Say, Stink, don't you remember 
Frances Newsom's ability for acting? 
Well, she's a chorus girl at the new the- 
atre—The Liberty Street Opera House. 
And, by the way, what's become of 
Doris Tucker? I heard that she and Moir 
Lancaster were married. Do you sup- 
pose they are getting along okay? Doris 
Holden is also on the screen — don't you 
remember she got her training proposing 
to the North High boys? And Paul 
Cheek has gone into the tailoring busi- 
ness so he can make a pair of pants to 
fit himself." 



"The other day I was walking down 
the street, when I happened to look in- 
side a dog-pawn shop, and what do you 
think I saw?" replied Gray as he puffs 
harmoniously on his cigar. "I saw Da- 
vid West washing away on a big, Ger- 
man police dog. Seated at a big, ma- 
hogany desk, I saw Ruth Landingham, 
checking the dogs, as Clarice Bruce, the 
dogcatcher, brought them in." 

"Why, that's nothing," yawns Ray- 
mond, as he stretches his long legs, "the 
other day I was sitting in my office, 
working over my carpenter contracts, 
when Margaret O'Neal came in looking 
for a job. Of course, I would like to 
have given her one, but I am not getting 
regular work, and I can hardly afford 
to have a secretary and pay her four 
or five dollars a week. That's not even 
enough money to keep up Lawrence 
Highfill and his wife, Mary Bennett, who 
are trying to live on love." 

Throwing away his short cigar stub, 
and lighting another, Gray leans back in 
his chair, and throws his legs up on the 
radiator. 

"That about covers our whole class, 
except a few more, whose names I can't 
remember." 

Looking directly in front of him, Gray 
sees a familiar looking person trying to 
get his attention. While speaking to 
Raymond, he accidently looks up to see 
the big eyes of Paul Cheek, the tailor. 

"Well, look who it is!" 

"Come here, Stink, I want you to 
meet one of our old classmates, Paul 
Cheek. Paul, we have been discussing 
our old class mates. Do you remember 
any?" 

Paul takes a seat that Stink has po- 
litely offered and begins telling all he 
knows about the remainder of the class. 

"The last information I have on Sara 
Barrett is that she is still trying to date 
Robert Taylor, and our friends, Marie 
(Continued on page 196) 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page eighty-one 



*sW*=-c£=» 




«22=*^*,_ 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JUNE CLASS, 1937 

Mary Bennett 



We, the seniors of North High School 
in the June graduating class of 1937, be- 
ing as sane as could be expected after 
four years of hard work, leave all our 
possessions and abilities to be distribut- 
ed in the following manner: 
Section I, Article I 
We thank the faculty for all the inter- 
est they have shown in us during our 
school days. 

Article II 
To Mr. Swaringen, we wish to say 
that we especially appreciate all he did 
for us during our senior year and grad- 
uation. 

Article III 
Our principal, Mr. Haltiwanger, we 
are grateful to for his kindness and in- 
terest in us during our last school years. 
Sectionll: Article I 
To Mr. Swaringen, our homeroom 
teacher, we leave the seniors of next 
year, and we hope they don't have as 
many places to go during homeroom pe- 
riod as we had. 

Article II 
Our knowledge of English literature 
we leave to Miss Dungan to pass on to 
students who need it in future years. 
Article III 
The faculty, we forgive for giving us 
so much homework, and we leave to 
them many years of sending as success- 
ful classes as ours into the world. 
Section III: Article I 
To the seniors of next year we leave 
our American History books and we sin- 
cerely hope that they will like it as well 
as we did and have as hard time learn- 
ing it as we did. 

Article II 
Frances Newsom and Lawrence High- 
fill leave their intellectual ability to be 
used for the good of the school, because 
we don't know anyone who really needs 
it. 

Article III 
Raymond Holder leaves his flirting 



ability to Ed Clarke. With that new 
car and Raymond's ability, will Ed rate? 
Article IV 
Ruth Landingham leaves her flirting 
ability to Dot Darnell. Watch out, 
girls. 

Article V 
To F. L. Wooten, David West leaves 
his good disposition. We want to see 
you smile more, F. L. 

Article VI 
Doris Holden leaves her singing abil- 
ity to Dewey Pegram. We expect to 
hear you on the radio, Dewey. 
Article VII 
Gray Shermer leaves his athletic abil- 
ity to Luther Ray Kiser. We're expect- 
ing a good team next year. 
Article VIII 
Doris Tucker's good looks, she leaves 
to Louise Barnes. Take good care of 
them, Louise. 

Article IX 
Moir Lancaster's good looks, he leaves 
to J. A. Mock. We want Ed to have 
some competition, J. A. 
Article X 
Our school we leave with Mr. Halti- 
wanger to use for a worthy cause. 
Article XI 
J. D. always talked so much that we 
want to leave this ability to Lillian Cur- 
rin. But don't talk on class, Lillian. 
Article XII 
The class leaves their love for Byron 
to Bob Newsom. Will this be enough 
to make you like him, Bob? 
Article XIII 
Our senior privileges we leave to the 
seniors of next year. Especially do we 
leave the conference room in the library. 
Article XIV 
Anything that we have lost that can 
be used (minds, abilities of any kind, 
offices, etc.), you may look for in the 
Lost and Found. 

(Continued on page 223) 



Page eighty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 




c^jatiuiti^^ 



I! 




NORTH HIGH CITY GOVERNMENT 



Mayor— Gray Shermer 

Judge— Louise Lineback, First Semester 
Ruby Hall, Second Semester 

Police Chief— F. L. Wooten 

Solicitor— J. A. Mock 

Clerk of Court— Jean Simpson, First 
Semester; Erleen Lawson, Second 
Semester 

Court Stenographers— Evangeline But- 
ner, Grace Smith 

Policemen— F. L. Wooten, Chief; J. D. 
Allgood, Doris Poindexter, Marie Van- 
hoy, Hilda Futrell, James Harrington, 
Clarice Bruce, Mildred Childress, Ivis 
Hicks, Billy Nicholson, Luther Ray 
Kiser, J. E. Robbins, Grace Lee Hin- 
shaw, Marion Cates, Dorothy Oeh- 
man, Worth Parrish, Harriet Thomp- 
son, Melvin Hutchins. 

BLACK AND GOLD 



Board of Aldermen— Joseph Wright, 
Webster Lineback, Mary Bennett, 
Kathryn Darden, Frances McDaniel, 
Leslie Kiser, Roy Turner, Amos 
Spease, Cecile Williams, Dwight Kir- 
by, Roy Lee Latham, Waldo Oehman. 
Una White, Lithuania Moss, Bill 
Knott, Bob N e w s o m , Ruby Hall, 
Helen Morgan, David Harrison, Ruby 
Taylor, Bill Morgan, E. S. Hall, Dick 
Helsabeck, Hilda Simmons, Thomas 
Coe. 

Sponsor s— Board of Aldermen, Miss 
Dungan; Court, Mrs. Bankston; Po- 
licemen, Mrs. Bunn; Superior Court, 
Miss Penry, Miss Stockton, Mrs. 
Bankston, Miss Dungan. 

Page eighty-five 




S .2 



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10 TO 

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DEBATERS 

F. L. Wooten, Louise Barnes, Margie Fulp, Doris Poindexter. J. A. Mock, Billy Nicholson. Miss Nash, Coach. 

EXCELSIOR AND HONOR SOCIETY 

R. Landingham, E. Lawson, M. Vanhoy, D. Holder, F. Newsom, D. Tucker, R. Payne, J. Simpson, L. Currin 

r. Hinshaw, L. Highfill, G. Shermer, J. D. Allgood, E. Clarke. R. Newsom, F. L. Wooten, E. Burner, R. Hall, 

Mr. Haltiwanger and Mr, Weathers, sponsors. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page eighty- 




Eleanor Tesh . 
Helen Morgan 
Hilda Futrell _ 



GIRL RESERVES 

President June Hudgins Secretary 

Vice-President Rachael Payne. Jnterclub Representative 
Treasurer Miss Louise Mock Adviser 



Grace Lee Hinshaw 
Doris Holden 
Margie Fulp 
Lillian Currin 
Mary Bennett 
Martha Jones 
Frances Newsom 
Elsie Jennings 
Ruby Hall 
Tommy Hinshaw 
Lucile Edwards 



MEMBERS 

Margaret Vaughan 
Lucille Lancaster 
Mildred Childress 
Doris Poindexter 
Pauline Russell 
Virginia Highfill 
Evangeline Butner 
Lola Belle Shelton 
Catherine Cardwell 
Margie Mashburn 
Anna Mae Knott 
Mallie Mae Bennett 

HI-Y CLUB 



Ruby Taylor 
Edna Simmons 
Helen Kiser 
Mary Ethel Johnson 
Evelyn Weatherman 
Lucille White 
Frances Hailey 
Mary Alice Chilton 
Dana Carter 
Henrietta Caldwell 
Florence Caldwell 



James Harrington President 

F. L. Wooten, Jr. Vice-President 

Joseph Wright Secretary 

Mr. H. B. Duke— Adviser 



James Vernon 
Robert Newsom 
J. A. Adams 
David Austin 

Page eighty-eight 



MEMBERS 

Melvin Fogg 
David Harrison 
Paul Cheek 
Pete Graveley 



Roy Turner 
J. D. Allgood 
Roy Braswell 
Robert Hampton 

BLACK AND GOLD 




BOOSTERS' CLUB 



HOME ECONOMICS' CLUB 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page eighty-nine 




MONOGRAM CLUB 

Moore. Morgan, Shermer, Johnson. Highfill, Lancaster. McCulloch. Hailey, Redding, Roberts, Hutcherson. Wooten, 

Holden. Landingham. 

BASEBALL TEAM 

Landingham, Boyles, Shermer, Wooten, Roberts, Hutcherson, Reid, Lancaster, Hampton, Johnson Moore. Hall 

Morgan, McCulloch, Parrish, Clarke, Holder 



Page ninety 



BLACK AND GOLD 






m 





BASKETBALL TEAM 

Shermer, Lancaster. Wooten, West, Highfill, Roberts, Fogg, Hutcherson, Harris, Johnson, Mr. Weathers, Coach 

Landingham, Mgr. 

FOOTBALL TEAM 

Cheek. Wooten, Shermer. Lancaster, Pegram, West, Lineback, Goforth, Clodfelter, Redding; Mock, Clark Johnson. 
McKenzi«, Gabriel, Snyder, Mr. Johnson, Coach Landingham, Mgj. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page ninety-one 




BASKETBALL 



Harding, B.rinkley. Bennett, Feimster, Newsom, Tucker, Buckner, Joyce, Lawson, Lancaster, Bruce, Bennett, Currin, 

Hall 



BASEBALL AND SOCCER 



Newsom, Hall, Bennett, Tucker, Currin, M. Bennett, Harding, Feimster, Brinkley, Knott, Guy, Holden, Lyqrly, 

Burton, Stewart 



Page ninety-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 



IBM 






... 



- 








>:••: 



<z/\£unoLdi cyjiari ^ckooL 




To 

Mr. Ralph F. W. Brimley 
who enriched all phases of school life, for his efficient 
service while at the Richard J. Reynolds High School, we 
gratefully dedicate this section of the Black and Gold. 




Claude Reuben Joyner, A. B., Principal of Richard J. Reynolds High School 



University of North Carolina 



^.^v-^. IO.J 




/ r I , jfr-^^-*- 



REYNOLDS HIGH FACULTY 

Gladys E. Moore, A. B., Ed. M., Vocational and Educational Adviser 

University of Minnesota, Harvard University 

Anna Lula Dobson, B. C. S., Dean of Girls 

Eastman College, Palmer School, Salem College. Woman's College of U. N. C. 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATORS 
Ruth C. Kiger Doris Voss 

CAFETERIA 
Rosa Tinder, B. S. 

Peabody College. Cornell University, Harrisburg State Teachers College 

COMMITTEES 

ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 
Mr. L. W. Crowell Mr. B. B. Redmond Mr. W. F. Shealy 

Mr. Joby Hawn Mr. Claude Smith Mr. J. D. Kallam 

Mr. Walker Barnette Miss Dorothy Knott 

LOCKER COMMITTEE 
Mr. K. M. Peters 

USHERS 
Mr. W. S. Buchanan Mr. J. D. Kallam 

EDUCATION AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 
Mr. Millard Jackson Miss Gladys E. Moore 

PUBLICATIONS 
Miss Mary Sterling Mr. L. W. Crowell 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

Miss Gladys E. Moore Miss Mary Wiley Mr. Millard Jackson 

Mr. L. W. Crowell Mr. C. R. Joyner 

BOOKKEEPING 
Miss Bess Ivey 

CHAPEL PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
Miss Sarah Olive Smith Miss Hazel Stephenson 

CHEERLEADER COMMITTEE 
Miss Donnye Worley Miss Margaret Lumpkin 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page ninety-seven 



.^k^rfk, IO^ 




Miss Worley. Mrs. Williams, Misses Huggins. Ford, Watts, Dobson, Sasher, Ivey 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 
Anna Lula Dobson, B. C. S., Head of Commercial Department 

Eastman College, Palmer School, Salem College, Woman's College of U. N. C. 



Ruth A. Ford, B. C. S„ A. B. 

Salem College 

University of Colorado 

University of Virginia 

Bowling Green Business University 

Louisana State University 

Duke University 

Mary L. Huggins, B. S. S. 

B.owling Green Business University 

Peabody College 

University of Kentucky 

Bess A. Ivey, A. B. 

Salem College 

Eastman College 

University of North Carolina 



Audrey Sasher, B. S., A. A. 

Centenary College 

Virginia Intermont 

Fredericksburg State Teachers College 



Hessie Watts, A. B„ M. A. 

Duke University 



Garnett Kelly Williams 

Wake Forrest College 

Roanoke National Business College 

Woman's College of University of North Carolina 



Donnye Worley 

Peabody University 

Draughon's Business College 

Graduate of Palmer School of Writing 

Graduate of Zaner Bloser School of Writing 

Salem College 



Page ninety-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



eV "^ LQ-Zi 



^?i-K^*- 




Miss H. Stephenson, Mrs. Mitchell, Misses Edwards. Kreeger, Troutman E. Kapp. Sterling, 
Misses Nicholson, Albnght, Mrs. Stephenson, Misses Wiley, E. B. Kapp, Flynn, M. Martm, Mrs. Blakemore 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 
Mary C. Wiley, A. B., Head of English Department 

Woman's College of University of North Carolina 

Emma Kapp, A. B. Mae Kreegar, A. B. Mary Martin, A. B. 

Salem College Salem College Duke University 



Thelma Albright, A. B., M. A. 

Greensboro College 
Duke} University 

Inez P. Brooks, A. B„ M. A. 

Georgia State Teachers College 

University of Georgia 

University of North Carolina 

Elizabeth Blakemore, A. B. 

Peabody University 
Salem College 

Lucille Edwards, A. B. 

Greenville Women's College 

Elizabeth B. Kapp, A. B. 

Greensboro College 
Salem College 



University of North Carolina 

Mildred Moores Mitchell, A. B. 

Greensboro College 

Hazel Stephenson, A. B., M. A. 

Salem College 
Columbia University 

Marjorie Siewers Stephenson, A. B. 

Salem College 

Mary Sterling, A. B. 

Woman's College of University of North Carolina 
Salem College 

Ruth Troutman, A. B. 

Columbia University 
Lenior Rhyne College 



LIBRARY 
Ola Maye Nicholson, A. B., Head of Library 

Guilford College, Library Science, University of North Carolina 

Elizabeth Flynn, A. B. 

Duke University 
Library Science, University of North Carolina 



•sW*^^. 



k-sk=X^fc.,- 




...... . 



. . '. .- ... 

.. ■ ' ■ ■■, • .-. . 

- ::«Hw« 

■ 



Miss Morgan, Messrs. Elrick, Jackson, Stinson, Miss Helmich 

HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Ruth Helmich, B. S., Head of Home Economics Department 

Salem College 



Ardena Morgan A. B., B. S. 

Salem College 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT 
Millard Jackson, B. E., Head of Industrial Arts Department 

Eastern Illinois Teachers College 



Frederick }. Elrick, B. S. 

Friends University, Wichita 

Kansas State Teachers College, Pittsburg 

Mergenthaler Linotype School, Brooklyn 

Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh 



E. H. Stinson, B. S. in Industrial Arts 

N. C. State College 



Page one hundred 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Misses Heilig. M. Martin, Whitley. F. Martin, Bailey. Ervin 

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 
Annie Preston Heilig, A. B., M. A., Head of Language Department 

Woman's College of University of North Carolina 



Margaret Bailey, A. B. 

Winthrop College 

Ethel Ervin, A. B. 

Duke University 



Faye Martin, A. B. 

Woman's College of University of North Corlina 

Mary Martin, A. B. 

University of North Carolina 
Duke University 



Pauline Lois Whitley, A. B. 

Oxford College 
Touraine University, France 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred one 




Messrs. Crowell, Shealy, Redmond, Mrs. Reich. Misses Smith, Hendrix, Messrs. Peters. Rose 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 
Sarah Olive Smith, B. S„ Ed. M„ Head of Mathematics Department 

Guilford College 
Duke University 



L. W. Crowell 

Springfield College 

Melrose Hendrix, A. B. 

Salem College 

Kenneth M. Peters, A. B. 

Emoiy and Henry College 



B. B. Redmond, B. S. 

Presbyterian College 

Katherine R. Reich, A. B. 

Winthrop College 

M. S. Rose, A. B. 

Duke University 



W. F. Shealy, A. B. 

Newberry College 



Page one hundred two 



BLACK AND GOLD 



^»k^C^, 107/ 




H3L 



Jfc^x&+*^. 




Messrs. Buchanan, Kallam, Misses Martin, Emmart, Mr. Pfohl 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
Flossie Martin, A. B., B. S., Head of Science Department 

Salem College, Columbia University, University of N. C Alleghany School for Natural History 



W. S. Buchanan, B. S. 

Davidson College 

Duke University 

University of North Carolina 



Kathryn Emmart, B. A., M. S. 

Salem College 
Penn. State 



J. D. Kallam, B. S. 

Furman University 



Joseph T. Pfohl, A. B. 

Moravian College 

University of North Carolina 

Salem College 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred three 



<^j*^w lO./ 




Misses Lumpkin, Knott, Jones, Mr. Hahn, Miss Weaver, Messrs. Barnette, Smith, Miss Moore 

SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 



Gladys E. Moore, A. B., Ed. M., Head of Social Science Department 

University of Minnesota 
Harvard University 

Walker Barnette, A. B., M. A. Dorothy Knott, B. S. 

University of North Carolina Fredericksburg State Teachers College 



H. C. Hawn, A. B. 

Lenior-Rhyne College 

Irene Barton Jones, B. S 

Greenville Women's College 
Furman University 



Margaret Lumpkin, A. B. 

Georgia State College for Women 



Claude Duane Smith, B. S. 

Appalachian State College 

Janie Weaver, A. B. 

Greensboro College 



Page one hundred four 



BLACK AND GOLD 







CL 



a±±E± 




JANUARY CLASS OFFICERS 

Bill Murphey President Julian Daye Historian 

Elizabeth Carroll ^.Vice-President Harry Lee Nunn Poet 

Roxie Rothrock Secretary Phil Froelich Prophet 

Emma Gray Davis Treasurer Zeno Hoots Testator 

Mary Anne Logan Mascot Miss Annie Preston Heilig Sponsor 

Flower Red Rose 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred seven 




Frances Hayden Ander- 
son 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire—To Be Tall 

Childrens Home Basketball 1, 2, 3, 

4; G. A. A. 1, 2; Radio Club 1. 



Juanita Mae Brinkley 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Succeed 

South High 1, 2, 3, 4; Boosters 

Club 5; Central High, Washington, 

D. C, 4. 



K. M. Cashion, Jr. 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Teach Miss 

Lumpkin Some History 
Varsity Tennis 3; Monogram Club 
3, 4; Class Pres. 2; Class Sec. 3 
Boosters Club 1, 2; Stamp Club 2 
Stunt Night 2; House of Rep. 3 
Dram. Club 2; Ushers Club 4; Latir 
Club 1. 



Shelby L. Boger 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Double For 

George Raft 
Stamp Club 1; Print. Club 2, 3. 4. 

James "Pete" Byrd 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Travel 
Scout Club 2. 



Adell Cottingham 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Some- 
one's Dish-Washer 
North High 1, 2, 3; G. R. 1, 2, 3; 
Knitting Club 4; Newspaper Staff 
3; Rhythmic Club 1, 2; Class Base- 
ball; Soccer; Basketball; Etiquette 
Club 2, 3. 



James Franklin Braswell 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Chief 
Justice Of Supreme Court 
North High 1, 2; House of Rep. 4; 
Jr. Hi-Y 1, 2; Class Baseball 1, 2; 
Class Basketball 2; Class Soccer 1, 
2; Marionette Club I; Policeman 
Club 1, 2. 



Jamie Carter 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Attend 

School Regularly 

Boosters Club 2; Squirt Football 1; 

Stamp Club 1; Etiquette Club 5. 

Hazel Creson 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire- — To Finish 

School 



Page one hundred eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Carol Davis 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Dress Like 

Miss Albright 
Baseball 1; G. R. 1, 2, 3, 4; V. 
Pres. 3; Dram. Club 1, 3; Boosters 
Club 1. 2; Knitting 3; G. A. A. 3 
Harlequin Club 4; House of Rep. 2 
Class Basketball 1: Soccer Team 3 
Class V. Pres. 4; Etiquette Club 2. 

Julian Francis Daye 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Read 
"Anthony Adverse" In Two Days 
Stamp Club 1; Council 1. 3, 4; 
House of Rep. 4: House Executive 
Member 4; Met. Sci. Club 4; Class 
Pres. 2; Jr. Hi-Y 2; Football Mgr. 
3, 4; Monogram 3; State Council 
Congress Delegate 4. 

Edward James Dize 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Walk On 

Ice In Court 
Football 1; Class Treas. 1, 2; Class 
Pres. 3; Basketball 1,2,3,4; Golf 

1, 2, 3, 4; Capt. 4; Monogram Club 

2, 3, 4; Reviersco Club 4; Vice 
Pres. 4. 



Emma Gray Davis 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Work In 

Kress. 



Sunshine Dillon 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make The 
Most Of Life 
Dram. Club 1, 2, 3; Hobby Club 2; 
Baseball 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Lib. 
Page 1, 2; G. R. 1, 2, 3; Etiquette 
Ciub 2, 4; Office Page 2, 3; Boost- 
ers Club 3; Knitting Club 4. 



Mary Nell Ferebee 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Lawyer 
G. R. 3; Travel Club 1; Class Soc- 
cer 1; Class Basketball 1; Class 
Baseball 1; Home Ec. Club 1; Knit- 
ting Club 3. 



John A. Davis 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Sleep. 

Carl E. Dixson 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Thumb To 

Florida 

Class Soccer 1 . 2; Varsity Tennis 

2, 3. 4; Capt. 4; Monogram Club 

2, 3, 4. 



Philip N. Froelich 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Graduate 
Boosters Club 1; Pres.; Squirt Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Scrub Football 3; "The 
Wedding" 4; Dram. Club 4, 5; 
Cheerleader 4; Drum Major 4; Eti- 
quette Club 5. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred nine 




Nancy Gabriel 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To See David- 
son Win 



Virginia Lee Jarvis 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be A 

Designer 

South High 1, 2; Traffic Dept. 1, 

2; Per. Rel. Dept. 2; Etiquette Club 

4. 

William C. King 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go Places 



Ruth Elizabeth Hauser 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be Tall 

Etiquette Club 1; Needlecraft Club 

4: Girls Wide Awake Club 1; Class 

V. Pres. 4. 



Woodrow Bryant Jarvis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An Auto 

Designer 
Clemmons School 1 . 

Barbara Miller Limerick 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Teach His- 
tory Like Miss Lumpkin 
Knitting Club 3; Travel Club 4. 



Zeno Hoots Jr. 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Studi] 

Medicine 

Council 3. 4; Delegate to State 

Council Congress 3; Class Testator 

4. 



Edward Jurney 

Scientific Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Have A 

Radio 

South High 1; Met. Sci. Club 3, 4. 

Harvey Joel Merritt 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel 



Page one hundred ten 



BLACK AND GOLD 




John Dunn Midyettc 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Reduce 
Scrub Football 1; Varsity Football 
2, 3. 4; Varsity Track 2, 3; Mono- 
gram Club 2, 3. 4; Pres. 3; Glee 
Club 4; Dram. Club 3. 

Virginia Dare Nading 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be An Air 

Hostess 
G. R. 3; Class Basketball I; Class 
Baseball 1; Knitting Club 3; Home 
Ec. Club 1. 

George Page 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Santa 
Claus 
North High 1; Soccer 1; Basketball 
1. 5; Scrub Football 2; Varsity 
Football 3, 4, 5; Varsity Baseball 
1. 4; Midget Baseball 2; Hi-Y 1. 



Bill Murphey 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Talk Like 
Park-Ya-Karkus 
North High 1, 2; Board of Alder- 
men 2; Class Pres. 4; Jr. Hi-Y 2; 
Class Baseball 2, 3. 



Myrtle E. Nichols 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Chief 
Justice o[ Supreme Court's Secretary 
Glee Club 1, 2; G. R. 1. 2, 3, 4 
Home Ec. Club 2; Dram. Club 1. 2 
Etiquette Club 2; Office Page 4 
Lib. Page 1, 2. 



James E. Phillips, Jr. 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Have Lots 

Of Excitement 
Boosters Club 1, 2, 3; Aero Club 1; 
N. C. Club 2; V. Pres. 3; Radio 
Club 3; Reviersco Club 4; Baseball 
4; Track 3: Football 4, 5; Etiquette 
Club 5; Monogram 4. 



Alex Nading 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Fly 
Class Soccer 1; Radio Club 1; Eti- 
quette Club 1. 2. 

Harry Lee Nunn, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Own A 
Pierce-Arrow Station Wagon 
South High 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Dram. Club 1, 2; "The Toymaker" 
1; "The Elfin Knight" 1; "Station 
YYYY" 2; Aud. Dept. 1; Traffic 
Dept. 2; Per. Rel. Dept. 2; Band 
1; "The Will" 2; House of Rep. 
3, 4; "The Segya" 4; "Pine Whis- 
pers" 5; Ushers Club 3, 4, 5; Win- 
ston Hi Players 4, 5: "A Wedding" 
4; "The Dweller in the Darkness" 
5; Debaters Club 4, 5; V. Pres. 4, 
5; Track 3, 4; Jr. Hi-Y 2; Black and 
Gold Bus. Staff 5; Winner Mock 
Presidential Campaign 5; "Thank 
You, Doctor" 5. 

Mary Virginia Reavis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Nurse 
Basketball 1; Wide Awake Club 1; 
G. R. 2, 3. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred eleven 




Elizabeth Richardson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Secretary 

Of War 
Dram. Club 1; Class Basketball 1; 
Class Baseball 1; Travel Club 4; 
G. A. A. 4. 

Roxie Drucilla Rothrock 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Play 
Football 
Girls Wide Awake Club 1; Class 
Baseball 1: Class Basketball 1; Var- 
sity Basketball 3, 4; Varsity Base- 
ball 2, 3, 4: Varsity Soccer 3, 4; 
Captain 4; G. A. A. 3. 4; G. R. 2, 
3, 4; Monogram 3, 4; Class Sec. 4. 

Annie Pearl Tilley 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be Vivian 

Shermer's Secretary When She 

Is President 

Class Basketball 1; Class Baseball 

1; Dram. Club 1; Lib. Page 1. 2. 3; 

Lib. Staff 3; Sec. 3; Hobby Club 2. 



Nellie Grace Richardson 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — It's A Secret 

Class Baseball 1; Class Basketball 

1; Orchestra 2; Boosters Club 2, 3; 

Lib. Page 3, 4; Etiquette Club 4. 

Virginia Mae Stevens 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be 

President Roosevelt's Secretary 

Lib. Page 1, 2, 3; Lib. Staff 3; V. 

Pres. 3; Dram. Club 1; Knitting 

Club 4; Hobby Club 2. 

Mary Frances Waller 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be Three 

Inches Taller 



Ralph F. Rink 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Able To 

Run A Linotype 
Lib. Page 1; Print. Club 1, 2, 3; 
"Pine Whispers" 4. 

Charlotte Creola Tate 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— Can't Tell 
Orchestra 2: Lib. Page 1, 2; Knit- 
ting Club 4. 

B. Tom Woodall 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Escape 
Class Football 1; Class Baseball 1; 
Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4; Boosters Club 
1, 2; Scrub Football 2; Scrub Base- 
ball 2; Varsity Football 3. 4. 5. 6; 
Baseball 3, 4, 5. 6; Etiquette Club: 
Glee Club. 



O'Dell Childress 

General Course 



OTHER SENIORS 
Guy Vogler Horn Mozelle Katrina Owens Jim Swaim 

Scientific Course Household Arts Course Scientific Course 



Page one hundred twelve 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Jfci-V^fc 



JANUARY CLASS POEM 

Harry Lee Nunn, Poet 



^ 



Neath the tall and stately pine trees, 
Large and beautiful, age-old pine trees, 
Stands a school, the Reynolds High School, 
Great and noble Reynolds High School. 
Softly mellowing stands tradition 
Stands the brightly shining past 
With its thoughts forever upward 
Stands a school, a school to last! 
'Mid the beauty of surroundings, 

Mid the beauty of the pine trees, 
'Mid the splendor of tradition 
Dignified and great tradition, 
Stands a place of inspiration 
Stands a place that does enthrall 
Our hearts with great emotion 
As we listen to her call. 



¥ 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred thirteen 











l-^fc 






SUPERLATIVES OF JANUARY CLASS 

MOST POPULAR BIGGEST FLIRTS 



Virginia Nading 
Phil Froelich 



Nellie Richardson 
Jim Swaim 



BEST LOOKING 

Nancy Gabriel 
Bill Murphey 

MOST INTELLECTUAL MOST ATHLETIC 

Ruth Hauser Frances Anderson 

Harry Lee Nunn O'Dell Childress 

BEST-ALL-ROUND 

Roxie Rothrock 
Tom Woodall 



Page one hundred fourteen 



BLACK AND GOLD 



-c^aWx^Ss. 




*2a=*i*^..~ 



HISTORY OF JANUARY CLASS OF 1937 

Julian Daye, Historian 



It was in nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three— a cold winter — filled with joyous 
promise — that the good ship Reynolds 
High School stood at anchor at the wharf 
of a school year. This ship had carried 
many passengers to the land of Great 
Wisdom, but this was a day to be re- 
membered in history. A number of 
charming young ladies and gentlemen 
stepped aboard, for they had been told 
that they were to sail over new waters 
in quest of The Fountain of Higher Edu- 
cation. 

To me was entrusted the important 
task of writing the log of the voyage — 
the voyage that all realized was the most 
important of their lives. My narrative 
begins with the trip through the Fresh- 
man Islands of smaller learning. We 
chose for the first voyage Howard Sel- 
lars captain, who proved his capability 
of undertaking command. 

We cheerfully rolled on waves of Al- 
gebra, Latin, and English. There were 
a few cases of seasickness, but the stew- 
ardess assured us that we would have to 
consume these indigestibles over and over 
until they were assimilated. Intellectu- 
ality was aboard disguised as Rodger 
Avery, who attained high honors in his 
studies. 

There is little to relate concerning this 
trip, as we were inexperienced voyagers 
whose ambition was to complete our tour 
in style. 

In January, 1934, one-fourth of our 
journey was complete. At the now fa- 
miliar wharf we reembarked upon the 
Reynolds High to sail upon the seas to 
the land of Sophomore. 

We encountered typhoons of triangles, 
tangents, and forty-five degree angles; we 
were destined to face storms of Latin and 
English. We sailed bravely on, and only 
a few met disaster. How proud I was to 
be chosen captain for this voyage. 

Over the four seas, we, the class of 
1937, were to sail, we had now steamed 



over two. New and more delightful ex- 
periences were ahead as we greeted our 
Junior year in January, 1935. The 
helmsman set his course for the large 
Junior Peninsula that jutted out from 
Sophomore Land. From bow to stern, 
we frolicked about, forgetting all bash- 
fulness that accompanys the lowerclass- 
men. Whom could we have chosen bet- 
ter to take command than Edward Dize? 
Possibly the seas inspire music, for Stan- 
ley Fishel won his share of honors with 
his inseparable clarinet. We had become 
careless in our confidence and were stu- 
dying with much less vigour than we 
had as lower-classmen. We had been 
carefree and gay just as the traditional 
junior, but in time our instructors warned 
us that soon we would be seniors and 
must buckle down to hard and earnest 
work. 

With dignity and pride the Class of 
1937 steamed away from the wharf for 
our last cruise on the Reynolds High. 
We chose as captain William Murphey. 
This last stage in our voyage was the 
most important. We had no time for 
gayety, for we had all we could do to 
fulfill our school activities. We began 
to stand out in the various activities. 
To athletics we contributed Thompson 
Woodall, Jim Swaim, George Page, 
O'Dell Childress, James Phillips, Dunn 
Midyette, and Edward Dize. Carl Dix- 
son was chosen captain of the 1936 State 
Champion Tennis Team of Reynolds 
High. Records from my log of the cruise 
show Ruth Hauser and Harry Nunn to 
be most intellectual of the voyagers. 

The end of this year brings to a close 
four happy years of educational voyag- 
ing and beginning of the Voyage of Real 
Life that all must some day embark upon. 
We have stood together through storms 
and gales, and not once did we give up 
the ship. The tides of our voyage have 

(Continued on page 204) 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred fifteen 




■o^te-^Bsn 



CLASS PROPHECY OF JANUARY, 1937 

Phil Froelich, Prophet 



Wandering aimlessly down the street 
one afternoon recently, I busied my mind 
with thoughts of my past life, and part- 
icularly, about the people I had once 
known. Where were my classmates 
from High School, for instance? What 
could have happened to them? How 
strange it seemed that in the short twen- 
ty-three years since we were all seniors 
in Reynolds High School so many of them 
had completely disappeared and I knew 
nothing of them. I mentally resolved 
to find out about them, sometime and 
somehow — and then let myself drift off 
lazily into other thoughts without any 
plans in mind. 

Being naturally of an easy-going tem- 
perament, I am not usually surprised, but 
I was somewhat startled when a pack- 
age suddenly dropped out of the ether 
at my feet, rudely interrupting my remin- 
iscences. The package was torn and dir- 
ty, but when I examined it, I discovered 
it was a newspaper — a kind I had never 
seen before, "Twin City Advertiser." 
Perhaps it was the new paper which had 
been rumored about Winston-Salem for 
some time, I thought, until I noticed the 
date — January 30, 1960. Then I knew 
it to be a revelation of the future; where 
it came from and what it meant I could 
not fathom, but I hastened to read it, feel- 
ing sure that it would contain some news 
of my long lost friends. 

On the second page I found an article 
headed "Peace Necessary To Mankind" 
dated from London, England, written by 
the famous reporter, Alex Nading. An- 
other item was headed "World Traveler 
Presents Colorful Travelogue," and, 
strangely enough, the traveler was James 
Phillips. On the editorial page was an 
article written by Julian Daye, editor of 
the "Twin City Advertiser." 

In the personal column the following 
articles: "Woodrow Jarvis and cousin, 
Virginia, are leaving tomorrow for New 
York, where they will begin a round-the- 



world flight in a new type speed plane." 
"Miss Carol Davis will leave tomorrow 
for Miami, Florida, where she will spend 
the remaining winter months competing 
in the National Amateur Golf and Tennis 
Matches." "Miss Virginia Nading, sec- 
retary to the President, is visiting her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nading, of this 
city." 

One advertisement on the same page 
caught my eye: "Be Well Groomed — J. 
F. Braswell Barber Shop." Another ad- 
vertisment read: "Morris Service — Own- 
ed and Operated by Wm. Murphey." 

On the society page I found some in- 
teresting news: "Mr. Joel Merrit to be 
speaker at Rotarian Banquet." "Miss 
Hazel Creson, only woman member of 
Congress, to visit city." "Miss Frances 
Anderson, world champion woman 500- 
meter swimmer, returns after competing 
in the Olympic games in Geneva, Swit- 
zerland." 

At the bottom of the page I found a 
comic strip drawn by Bill King, a resume 
of 1959 highlights, by Roxie Rothrock, 
news analyst, and a poem by Edward 
Jurney. 

On the last page were stock quotations 
by the brokerage firm of Hoots, Child- 
ress, and Boger. Also there was an esti- 
mate of an estate by the law firm of 
Page. Dixson, and Dize. 

I read "Examinations End At Reynolds 
High School," an announcement made by 
the principal, John Davis. At the bottom 
of the page I noticed this advertisement: 
"Buy your pencils, paper, notebooks, 
etc., etc., etc., from a reliable concern, 
K. M. Cashion and Company." 

On the sports page I found this story: 
"Coach Jim Swaim's Lavender Wave of 
Arkansas University Defeats Yale!" Al- 
so on this page was the item: "Coach 
Midyette of Notre Dame Ousted by Of- 
ficials." 

(Continued on page 206) 



Page one hundred sixteen 



BLACK AND GOLD 



-j*8te&£Ss» 




*22=*Mfc^— 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JANUARY CLASS 

Zeno Hoots 



We, the January class of 1937, being 
possessed of a somewhat limited estate, 
desiring greatly to show our apprecia- 
tion to those who have aided and been 
friends to us and realizing it more bless- 
ed to give than to receive, not grudingly 
or of necessity, do solemnly dispose of 
the following of our possessions: 

Article I 

Item I: To Mr. Joyner and the faculty 
we do express our sincere appreciation 
for their patient, diligent, and cease- 
less efforts in our behalf. 

Item II: To the 1 IB class and the seniors 
yet to come we leave the thrill of 
graduating and the privilege of being 
honored guests at the Junior -Senior 
We regret to say that these are the on- 
ly remaining remnants of the many 
senior privileges. 

Item III: To Miss Nicholson and Miss 
Flynn, the Librarians, we render our 
heartfelt thanks for aid given us in 
our reference work and especially for 
their many efforts to find us small 
books with large print. 

Item IV: We do cheerfully leave to the 
faithful janitors the long awaiting pri- 
vileges of picking up our exam papers. 

Article II 
Item I; We gladly leave 100 pounds of 
Dunn Midyette to Walter Curley. 
We feel this would materially improve 
Walter's excellent athletic ability 
which we hope will enable the foot- 
ball team to win the state champion 
ship in 1940. 

Item II: To Mack Alspaugh, Harry Lee 
Nunn hands down his dramatic ability. 
Incidentally Mack will inherit Harry 
Lee's handsomeness which has been 
such a decided factor in his success in 
dramatics. 

Item III: James Swaim leaves to Jack 



Brown his beautiful, golden brown 
hair. 

Item IV: Carl Dixson gladly leaves to 
Sam Smith his good looks; his famous, 
cunning smile, however, he steadfastly 
refuses to part with. 

Item V: The Siamese Twins are repre- 
sented in our class in the personages 
of Nell Ferebee and Virginia Nading. 
We leave this sincere friendship and 
seats by each other in the class room 
to Kathleen Murray and Edna Thom- 
as, hoping that one will never be seen 
without the other. 

Item VI: We are happy to hand down 
Phil Froelich's wonderful gift of gab 
to one Clay Shields, who, we are sure, 
will put it to many and varied uses. 

Item VII: Ruth Hauser leaves to John 
Peddycord her superb intellectual pow- 
er. This gift is sympathetically made 
in response to John's need of such. 

Article III 

Lastly after a special conference with 
Miss Heilig we leave to all future class 
day officers a liberal portion of our ori- 
ginality; they may be assured this will 
prove most valuable in satisfactorily 
arranging their class history, prophecy, 
poem, and will. 

We do hereby appoint our mutual 
friend and history model, Miss Margaret 
Lumpkin, as sole executrix of this our 
last will and testament. 

In witness whereof we have set our 
hand and seal, this, the 28th day of Janu- 
ary, Anno Domini, Nineteen Hundred 
Thirty-seven. 

Respectfully submitted 
Zeno Hoots, Testator 
Witnesses: 

Governor Alf Landon 
Dr. Samuel Johnson 
Daniel Boone 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred seventeen 








JUNE CLASS OFFICERS 

Charles Martin President Lawson Withers Poet 

Joe Belton Vice-President Paul Hendrix Testator 

Jean Hodges Secretary Peggy Dean Prophet 

Paul Lehman Treasurer Rogar Lee Norman Historian 

Ann Joy Murray Mascot 

Miss Ruth Ford Adviser 

Miss Pauline Whitley Adviser 

Flower: Red Rose Colors: Red and White 

Motto: "It is well to think well; it is divine to act well." 



Page one hundred eighteen 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Thelma Adams 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Become A 
Great Athlete 
Boosters 2; House of Rep. 2. 

Thurman G. Allred 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A 
Dictator 
Scout Club 1; Class Baseball I. 

Ruth Ashburn 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Act Natural 
"Class Baseball I; Class Basketball 
1;- Girls Glee Club 1. 3. 4; State 
Music Contest 1; Girls Wide Awake 
Club 1; Hobby Club 1; Needlework 
Club 3; V. Pres. 3; Solo and En- 
semble Club 4; Pres. 4. 



Ethel Mae Alford 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Win Tin 

Affection of Charlie Wilson 



Mack Alspaugh 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Foremost 

Basso In Metropolitan Opera 
Class Treas. 1; Freshman Drama- 
tics; Glee Club 1, 2. 4: Pres, 4; Ten- 
nis 3; State Music Contest 3; Dram. 
Club 4, 5; Ensemble 5; Stamp Club; 
"South in Sonora"; Debatinq Team 
5. 



Martha Ann Ashby 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Sing 

Tennis 1; Knitting Club 3; Boosters 



Lillian Bradfield Alley 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play The Pi- 
ano In Benny Goodman's Orchestra 
Girls Wide Awake Club 1; Lib. 
Page 1. 2; G. R. 2, 3. 4; G. A. A. 
Treas. 4; Tennis 3, 4; Dram. Club 
I. 

Mary Noble Angel 
Gfneral Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Surpass 
Peter Pan 
G. R. 2, 3. 4; Dram. Club 3; Deba- 
ter Club 3; Band 3, 4.; Solo and 
Ensemble Club 4; Accompanist 4: 
High School Music Contest 2, 3, 4; 
Winner State Federation Music Con- 
test 1, 2, 3; Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4. 

Rodger Milner Avery, Jr. 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Do A Tango 

In Chapel 
Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4, 5; Glee Club 4, 
5; Art Staff "Black and Gold" 1; 
Class Tennis 1, 2; Class Swimming 
1, 2; "South in Sonora" 4; Art Staff; 
Dram. Club 4, 5; Band 3; State Mu- 
sic Contest 4, 5. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred nineteen 




Robert M. Backer 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Travel 

Around The World In An Airplane 

Greensboro High 1, 2; Stamp Club 

3; Track 3; Basketball Mgr. 4. 



Phyllis Hauser Bazemore 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Second 

Sarah Bernhardt 
Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; Tennis 1 
"The Necklace" 3: Dram. Night 3 
"The Dweller in The Darkness" 4 
Dram. Club 3. 4; Office Page 4 
Office Page Club 4; Pres. 4. 

Joe Belton 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Win U. S. 

Open Golf Tournament 
House of Rep. 1, 3, 4, 5; Speaker 5; 
Golf 2, 3, 4, 5: Met. Sci. 4. 5; Pres. 
4, 5; Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4, 5; Ushers 
Club 5; V. Pres. 5. 



Henry T. Bahnson 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A Hermit 
Football 2. 3; Met. Sci. Club 3; Hi- 
Y 3, 4. 



Flora Belle Beck 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Be An Usher 

In A Theatre 
Tennis 1; Boosters 2; Latin Club 3; 
G. R. 4; Lib. Page 1. 



Sylvia Berlin 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Truck Like 

Martha Rage 
Lib. Staff 1, 2. 3, 4; G. R. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Dram. Club 3. 



Samuel J. Barbee 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desiret — 7*0 Be A Con- 
cert Violinist 
Solo and Ensemble Club 4; Violin 
Soloist 1, 4; Mixed Chorus 3. 



DeWitt Beeson, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Republi- 
can Candidate For President 
South High 1; V. Pres. Class 2. 



Jim Wallace Bovender 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Kick The 
.Gong Around 
House of Rep. 2. 



Page one hundred twenty 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Charles Brann 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Get Out Of 



Met. Sci. 



High School 
Club 3; French 



Club 4. 



James Alexander Brown 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Mr. 
Esquire 
Football 2: Soccer 1, 2; Class Bas- 
ketball 1, 2; Class Football 1. 2; 
Monogram Club 3; Boosters 1: Hob- 
by Club 1; Track 3, 4, 5; Basket- 
ball 3, 4, 5. 



- William E. Burchette 

Scientific Course 

Suppressed^ Desire— To Make An 

"A" Subject Average 



Edna Ellen Bridges 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Some- 
body's Private Secretary 
Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; Typist "Black 
and Gold" 4; Typist "Pine Whis- 
pers" 4; House of Rep. 4; Dram. 
Club 3; "Ambitious Guest" 3; Boo- 
sters 2. 



Robert A. Brown 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be A Mail 

Pilot 



Doris Elizabeth Burke 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Interpret And 

Appreciate Poetry 
Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; Travel Club 4; 
Lib. Page 4, 



Eme Brown 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Break 
Peroxide Over Inventor's Head 
Girls Wide Awake Club 1; Class 
Basketball 1; Monogram 3; G. R. 
2. 3, 4; Basketball 2. 3; Soccer 3; 
G. A. A. 3. 



Marie Burchette 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — Just "Ask And 

Ye Shall Know" 
South High I, 2; Student Council 2; 
Dram. Club 1; Glee Club 1; Danc- 
ing Club 2; Latin Club 3; Travel 
Club 4. 



Garmon Walter Burton 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Take Benny 

Goodman's Place 
Debaters Club 3; Etiquette Club 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred twenty- 




Opal Byrd 



Julia 



Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Sing Like 
Frances Langford 
G. R. 2, 3. 4; Glee Club 3. 



Mary King Campbell 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Live As Long 
As I Like And Have All My Likes 

As Long As I Live 
G. R. 2, 3. 4; Girl Scout 1. 2; De- 
baters Club 3, 4; Dram. Club 3; 
Knitters Club 3. 



Josephine Carter 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— It's A Secret 
Boosters 2; G. A. A. 3; Etiquette 
Club 4; Baseball 1; Soccer 4, 



S. Calhoun 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Able To 
Answer Correctly Every Time Miss 

Heilig Asks A Question 
Travel Club 3; G. A. A. 4; Soccer 
4. 

Mary Marvel Campbell 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Meet Robert 

Taylor 
G. R. 4; Dram. Club 3, 4: Etiquette 
Club 4. 



Frances Ann Caudle 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel 



Janet Campbell 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Go To 
South America 
High Point High School 1, 2. 



Jack Carter 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire-— To Be A 
Fireman 
Track Mgr. 3, 4. 

Howard Chambers 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play A 



Bazc 
3and 1, 2, 3, 4. 



>ka 



Page one hundred twenty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Ruth Elizabeth Chambers 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Beat Mrs. 

Wall is Simpson's Time. 



John Click 



Scientific Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Own A 

Duck Farm. 



Lenore Parish Clinard 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire~-To Dip Dough- 
nuts In A Bakery. 



Ruth Clodfelter 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Success 
South High 1. 2; Board Member 2; 
Auditing Dept. 1. 



Rosemary Cody 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Aid 
Humanity 
"Baseball 1, 2. 3, 4; Basketball 2 
3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; Cap. 3; Mgr. 4 
Monogram Club 2; G. A. A 3 
Readers Digest Club 4: G. R. 4: 
"Pine Whispers" Bus. Staff 4; Nat'l 
Hon. Soc. 4. 



Richard Cobb 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— Censored 
Scouting Club 1; Met Sci. Club 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3; "Segya" 3; "Pine 
Whispers" 4; "Black and Gold" 4; 
Snapshot Editor 4; Jr. Hi-Y 1; 
House of Rep. 4; Treas. 4. 



Robert Cohn 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Become A 
Dictator 
Dram. Club 3, 4; Ushers Club 4; 
Bus. Staff "Black and Gold" 3, 4; 
Ass't. Bus. Mgr. 4: Dram. Night 3, 
4; Debating Squad 4: Debaters Club 
4; "Larnin" 4. 



Hazel Sain Cobler 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Be A Suc- 
cessor To Mrs. Mitchell As 
Debating Coach of R. J. R. 
North High 1. 2; Lib. Page 1. 2 
Lost and Found 1, 2; Lit. Soc. 2 
Sec. 2; "Scribbler" 2; Glee Club 1 
Student Gov't. 1. 2; Debaters Club 
3, 4; Winner Slogan Contest On 
Prohibition; Debating 2, 3; Captain 
4. 



Henry D. Cook 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Live On 
Miami Beach 
Harlequin Club 4; Basketball 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred twenty-three 




Pauline Craft 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be A 

Reporter 

Knitting Club 3; Dram. Club 3, 4; 

Etiquette Club 4; G. R. 4. 

Marie Cunningham 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Sing In 

Metropolitan Opera 

G. R. 3; Solo and Ensemble Club 4. 

Dorothy Daniel 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To See Europe 
Joe Brown Jr. High 1; Jr. Dram. 
Club; Glee Club 3; Office Page 4; 
Office Page Club 4. Nafl Hon. Soc. 
4. 



Joe Creech, Jr. 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire—I Don't Suppress 

My Desire 
Summit School 1 , 2; Dram. Club 3: 
Spanish Club 3; Readers Digest Club 
4. 



Masten Dalton 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Date Mae 

West 
Cashier 1; Boosters 2; Met. Sci. 
Club 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Jr. Hi-Y 
3; Sr. Hi-Y 4. 

Leonard Darnell 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be* Coach At 

Notre Dame 
Football 1. 2, 3. 4. 5; Basketball 2, 
3, 5; Track 3, 4. 5; Baseball 2. 



Mebane F. Croom 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Tobacco Magnate 
House of Rep. 1; Boosters Club 1, 
2; State Doubles Champion 3, 4; 
Monogram Club 2, 3; Met. Sci. 
Club 3. 



Doris Dance 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Sing Like 

Martha Raye 
Dram. Club 1, 2; G. R. 2; Knitting 
Club 3. 



Dorothy S. Davis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Leave 
Winston-Salem 
North High 1, 2, 3; G. R. 1. 



Page one hundred twenty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Edna Elizabeth Davis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Success 
South High 1, 2; Schol. Dept. \ 
Board Member 2: Knitting Club 3 
Etiquette Club 4; Publications 4 
Class Pres. 2; Lost and Found 2 
Class Sec. 1. 



Mildred Lorraine Davis 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire^ — To Own A Jeep 
Class Baseball 1; Class Basketball 
1; Hobby Club 1; Girls Wide Awake 
Club 1; G. R. 3: Needlework Club 
4; Sec. 4; Etiquette Club 4; 
"Segya" 3; "Black And Gold" 3, 
4; Sr. Editor 4; "Pine Whispers" 
4; Managing Editor 4; Quill And 
Scroll 3. 4; S. I. P. A. 4. 



Robert Denny, Jr. 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Pass All 
Subjects 
Track 1, 2. 



Kenneth W. Davis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Second Lindbergh 
Debaters 1; Stamp Club 2; Basket- 
ball 1; Met. Sci. Club 1. 



Nancy Katherine Davis 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Go Around 

The World 

Dorothy Aileen Dodd 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Go To 

Florida Next Winter 

South High 1: G. R. 1. 4; Etiquette 

Club 4; Baseball 1; Basketball 1. 



Mabel Clair Davis 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Travel 

Europe 

Class Pres. 1, 2; House of Rep. 2, 

3. 



Peggy Dean 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Study (?) 
Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; "Segya" 3: 
"Pine Whispers" 4; Co-Sports Ed- 
itor 4; G. A. A. 3: Monogram Club 
2; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3. 4; 
Readers Digest Club 4; Sec. 4; 
Baseball Squad 1; Basketball Squad 
2, 3; Quill and Scroll 4. 



Juanita Dunning 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be A 

Psychiatrist 

Berryhill High, Charlotte 1; Glee 

Club 3; Dram. Club 3; Office Page 

Club 4; Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred twenty-five 




Paul D. Early 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — Always To 

Wonder. Often To Know 

Jr. Hi-Y 1, 2; Rotary Delegate 2; 

House of Rep. 3; "Black and Gold" 

2, 3, 4, 5; Managing Editor 3; Edi- 
tor-in-Chief 4; Org. Editor 5; "Pine 
Whispers" 2, 3, 5; Asso. Editor 3; 
Sports Editor 5: "Segya" 4; Asso. 
Editor 4; S. I. P. A. 4, 5; Honor- 
ary Student Pres. 1935-36; Sr. Hi-Y 

3, 4, 5; Sec. 5; Quill and Scroll 3 

4, 5; Treas. 4; Pres. 5; Nat'l. Hon 
Soc. 4, 5; V. Pres. 4; Treas. 5; Us 
hers Club 3, 4, 5; Met. Sci. Club 5 
Sec. 5: Readers Digest Club 4; Old 
er Boys Conf. 4, 5; Cross Country 5 
Monogram 5: Track 5. 

Tom T. Edwards 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — -To Sleep In An 

Upper Berth 
Debaters Club 4; Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 
4; V. Pres. 4; House of Rep. 2, 3. 
4; "Pine Whispers" Bus. Staff 4. 

Sallie W. Emerson 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Helen 

Of Troy 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Monogram Club 
2; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; G. 
A. A. 3; Office Page's Club 4; 
Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4. 

Page one hundred twenty-six 



Faye Edwards 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel 
Around The World 
Travel Club 3. 4. 



Virginia Mae Edwards 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Travel 
North High 1, 2; Police Club 1, 2; 
Tennis 1. 2; Nature Club 1. 



Aubrie E. Enochs 

Scientific Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Let These 

Long Years Be More Than A 

Memory 

Art Club 1; Aero. Club 4; Band 4, 

5. 



Pauline Edwards 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Get A Break 
Basketball 1. 2, 3: Debaters Club 
3; Baseball 1, 2; Etiquette Club 4. 

Louisa Mullins Ellerbe 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Ride In Alt 

Airplane 
Lib. Page 1, 2, 3, 4; Knitting Club 
3; French Club 4. 



Polly 



anna Evans 

General Course 



Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Mathematician 
Knitting Club 3; Debaters Club 
Etiquette Club 4; Dram. Club 3, 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Mary Innis Fades 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Reach My 

Goal 
House of Rep. 3; G. R. 4; Etiquette 
Club 4; Knitting Club 3. 



R. C. Flynt 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Sell 

Hardware 



Geneva Fortson 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Become A 

Soloist In Benny Goodman's 

Orchestra 

Needlework Club 3. 



John Ferebee 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Own Gene 

Isley's T-Model Ford 
Soccer 1, 2; Track 1. 2; Football 1, 
2; Dram. Club 4; Boosters 1, 2. 



Mary Sue Forrest 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Learn To 
Keep My Mouth Shut 
Chief Sr. Marshall 3; Basketball 2, 
3, 4: Captain 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Captain 3; Soccer 3, 4: Monogram 
Club 1, 2; G. A. A. 3; Etiquette 
Club 4; G. R. 4. 



Jack Foster 



Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An Army 

Aviator 
Met. Sci. Club; Aero. Club. 



Katharine Josephine Fitz- 
gerald 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Use The 

Proverbial Peroxide 

Travel Club 3; Solo Club 4; Dram. 

Club 4: Knitting Club 3. 

Stephen Taylor Forrest 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Find Out 
Mr. Redmond's Full Name 
Etiquette Club 1. 5; Club Reviersco 
4; Football 4, 5; Baseball 3, 4, 5: 
House of Rep. 4; Hi-Y 1, 2; Mono- 
gram Club 3; Hobby Club 2; Council 
5; Basketball 5: Ushers Club 5. 

Robert G. Foster 

Scientific Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be Out Of 

College In Ten Years 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred twenty-seven 




Agnes Freeman 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Love And 

To Be Loved 
French Club 4; "Pine Whispers" 4. 

Arthur Lee Googe 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Get Out 



Charles Bill Grishaw 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — I Don't Have 

One 
Fresh. Baseball; Scrub Football 1, 2; 
Baseball 3. 4. 5; Football 4; Socce. 
1; Capt. 1; House of Rep. 2; Fresh. 
Soccer Capt. 



Albert Fry 

Industrial Arts Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be In 

Student Activities 



James A. Gray, Jr. 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Drop Latin 
House/ of Rep. 1: Student Council 2; 
Hi-Y 3, 4; V. Pres. 4: Nat'l Hon. 
Soc. 4; Mgr. Football 3. 4; "Black 
And Gold" Bus. Staff 3: Bus. Mgr. 
"Black and Gold" 4; Second Place 
In Sidney Lanier Essay Contest 1 ; 
Monogram 4. 

Frances Louise Hagood 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Second 

Mrs. Simpson 
Needlework Club 3; House of Rep. 
4. 



R. E. Gibson, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be An 
Architect 
Baseball 1; Basketball 1. 

Helen Griffin 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Control My 

Temper 
Ass't. Cashier 2; G. R. 2. 3, 4; Na- 
ture Club 3; Harlequin Club 4. 

Wilfred Hahn 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To See Landon 

Elected President 
Soccer 1; Council 3; Tennis 2, 3, 4, 
5; Basketball 4, 5; Monogram Club 
3, 4: Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4, 5; Pres. 5; 
Stamp Club 2. 3; Debating Club 4, 
5; Pres. 5; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. 



Page one hundred twenty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Mary Kathryn Hampton Frances Elizabeth Hardin 



General Course 
Suppressed Desire~~To Wake Up 
Some Morning With Coal Black 
Hair 
G. R. 1. 2. 3. 4; Pres. 1; North 
High Delegate to G. R. Conference 
2; North High 1, 2, 3; Home Ec. 
2; Arts and Craft Club 3. 

Catherine M. Harrell 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Learn To 
Play "Tit Tat Toe" 
House of Rep. 2, 3, 4; Speaker Pro- 
tein 4: Student Gov. Congress 3; Soc- 
cer 3. 4; Baseball 2. 3, 4; Sr. Mar- 
shall 3; Etiquette Club 4; G. R. 4; 
Class Sec. 1, 2; Boosters 1, 2; G. 
A. A. 3; Basketball 3. 4. 



Mary Eloise Hassell 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire^To Grow Tall 



General Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Be A Nurse 

Or A Doctor 
G. R. 3: Glee Club 2; Basketball 3. 



Victor H. Harrell, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Beat Steve 

Forrest's Time 
Etiquette Club 1; Hobby Club 1: 
House of Rep. 1; Jr. Hi-Y 1, 2; 
Mgr. Baseball 2, 3; Monogram Club 
3, 4. 5; Met. Sci. Club 4, 5; Ushers 
Club 4, 5; Sr. Hi-Y 5. 



Madeleine Mary Hayes 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Waltz With 

Hitter 
Columbia S. C. High 1, 2; Dram. 
Club 3; Debaters Club 3; Readers 
Digest Club 3, 4; Debating Squad 
4. 



Paul E. Harper, Jr. 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Rate With 
"Sue" 
Cashier 1: Tennis I, 3. 4; Basketball 
1, 4; Debaters Club 3: Readers Di- 
gest Club 4: Mgr. Football 3; Cheer- 
leader 4. 



Donreath Harvey 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Preacher's Wife 
Cashier 2. 



Paul H. Hendrix 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Marry The 

Dionne Quintuplets 
Forsyth Hi-Y Asso. 5; Pres. 5; Us- 
hers Club 4, 5; Pres. 4, 5; Met. Sci. 
Club 4; Pres. 4; "Look Who's Here" 
4; Stunt Night 2; Dram. Night 3; 
Sr. Hi-Y 4, 5; Dram. Club 4, 5; 
Debating Squad 5; House of Rep. 2; 
Cashiers Club 3. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred twenty-nine 




Walter Howard Henry 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire-— 7*o Edit A Large 

Newspaper 

Milton Aydlotte Hines 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Get A Girl 
Boosters 1; Cashiers Club 1; Foot- 
ball I, 2, 3. 4, 5: Baseball 4. 5; 
Etiquette Club 5; Reviersco Club 4. 



Ruth F. Holleman 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be With A 

Certain Southside Boy 
Nature Club 3; G. A. A. 4. 



Donald Hewat 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Get Out 

Frances Hodge 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Abolish 

Competition 

Basketball 1, 2; Arts and Craft 2; 

G. R. 2. 3; Harlequin Club 4. 



Clayton Holt 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be People 
And Do Things At Different 
Places 
Hobby Club 1; Nature Club 4; Eti- 
quette Club 5: Basketball 3. 4. 5. 



Martha Eleanor Hine 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be A 

Second Galli-Curci 

Debaters Club 3, 4; Knitting Club 

3; Dram. Club 3, 4. 



Jean Hodges 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play 
Basketball 
Class Sec. 1, 2, 4: House of Rep. 
3; Council 4; Student Gov't. Confer- 
ence 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4: Soccer 
3, 4; G. A. A. 3, 4. 



Lucile E. Holt 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Dance Like 

Eleanor Powell 
Knitting Club 3. 



Page one hundred thirty 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Jack W. Holton 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Swim The 
Pacific Ocean From San Fran- 
cisco to Shanghai, China 
Met. Sci. Club 3; French Club 4. 



Clifford W. Hunt 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire- — 7*0 Be A Great 



Man 



Football 1, 2. 



Arnette Johnson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Date A 
Football Hero 
Nature Club 3; G. A. A. 2. 



Harry Hondros 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Run One- 
Quarter Mile In Fifty Seconds 
Football 3; Track 3, 4; Cross Coun- 
try 4; Aero. Club 3, 4; "Pine Whis- 
pers" 3, 4. 

Ruby Louise Hunt 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Gain And 

Keep Everlasting Happiness 

House of Rep. 2; G. R. 4; Etiquette 

Club 4. 

LeGrand King Johnson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Second 

Bob Reynolds In One Respect 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Track 3; House 
of Rep. 3; Monogram Club 3, 4, 5; 
Mgr. Basketball 1; Golf 5. 



Elma Pauline Hoots 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Meet Jacques 
And Andre, My French Corre- 
spondents 
North High 1, 2; Glee Club 1; Lit. 
Soc. 2; Sec. 2; "Scribbler" 2; Office 
Page 1. 2: Lib. Page 1, 2; Student 
Gov. Official 1, 2; Debaters Club 3. 



Frances Amelia Ivester 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Reach The 

Moon 

North High 1, 2; Handicraft Club 

1, 2; Class Pres. 2. 



Wade Johnson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be 



President 



Latin Club 3. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred thirtv-one 




Martha Frances Johnston 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Success 
Boosters Club 2; Dram. 3; Sr. Mar- 
shall 3; Hobby Club 1; Girls Wide 
Awake Club 1; G. A. A. 3. 



Bill Keener 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Play Hamlet 
Boosters 2: Dram. Club 3, 4; Debat- 
ers Club 4. 



William F. Kimbrough 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— Not To Be A 
Book-Worm 
Class Baseball 1; Track 4. 



Harry M. Jones 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make An 

"A" Subject Average 
Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Read- 
ers Digest Club 4. 

Sylvia Ruth Kiger 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Have Curly 

Hair And Be Beautiful 
Etiquette Club 4; G. R. 4. 



A. H. Kimel 

Industrial Arts Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Live A 

Hundred Years 

House of Rep. 2; Print. Club 2, 3. 

4; Band 4. 



Dick Joyce 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Erect A 

Monument To Xangari On 

Times Square 

Boosters 2; Dram. Night 3: "South 

In Sonora" 3; Dram. Club 3, 4; Jr. 

Hi-Y 3; Sr. Hi-Y 4. 

Ovid Nelson Kimball 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire, — To Become 

President Of U. S. 

Scrub Football 1, 2; Etiquette Club 

4. 



Samuel Cromer King 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Travel 

Council 2; Ushers Club 3. 4; Jr. 

Hi-Y I. 2, 3; Sr. Hi-Y 4; Class 

Treas. 1; Cashier 1. 



Page one hundred thirty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Haddon S. Kirk 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Invent A 
New Game 
Asst. Mgr. Football 3; Jr. Hi-Y 3; 
Debaters Club 4; Sr. Hi-Y 4: Ten- 
nis 2. 3, 4. 



Jack Land 



Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Play A Cor- 
net Like Del Staigers 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; State Music Con- 
test 1, 2, 3, 4; Brass Quartett 1, 
2, 3, 4; Brass Ensemble 3; Music 
Club 4. 



Kathryn Lea 



Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Be A Nurse 
Etiquette Club 4. 



William Gilbert Kiser 

Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Succes 

In Life 
Aero. Club 4; House of Rep. 2. 



David Lanier 

Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Marry Elisc 

Muse 
Baseball 3, 4: Football 2. 



Paul Lehman 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire- — Wouldn't Know 
Ushers Club 3, 4; Jr. Hi-Y 3: Sr. 
Hi-Y 4; Class Treas. 4; State Music 
Contest 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4; Music 
and Ensemble Club 4. 



Marian M. Knight 

Genekal Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Go To 

College 

Etiquette Club 4; Class Pres. 2; 

Nature Club 3. 

Barbara Anne Lasley 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Own A 

Streetcar 

"Segya" 3; G. R. 3; Glee Club 3, 

4; Travel Club 3; V. Pres. 3: "Pine 

Whispers" 4; Etiquette Club 4. 

Clarence Theodore Lein- 
bach, Jr. 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be A 

Commodore 

Band 3, 4; Met. Sci. Club 3; Music 

Club 4; "Pine Whispers" 4; Nat'l 

Hon. Soc. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred thirty-three 




Alanaise Linder 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire— To See Nellie 

Richardson Married To Arthur 

Simmons 

North High 1; Needlework Club 3. 

Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4. 



Kathryn Gray Little 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go To 
College 
South High 1, 2; Baseball 3. 4; Soc- 
cer 4; G. A. A. 3, 4. 

Christine Love 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Become An 

Accurate Stenographer 
South High 1. 2; Glee Club 1, 3; 
School Board 2; Lib. Staff 4; Fine 
Arts Club 3; Supt. Lost and Found 
2; Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4. 



Evelyn Lindsay 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Popeye's 

Sweetheart 
Girls Wide Awake Club 1; Boosters 
1; Soccer 2; G. R. 2; Etiquette Club 
4; Glee Club 2. 



George Herman Lippard 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Go Out 
Higher Than / Came In 
Fencing 4; Debating Team 4; Ten- 
nis 4; Dram. Club 4. 



Jim Malcomb 

Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Go To Notre 

Dame 
Children's Home Football 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 2. 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4. 



Elsie Little 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Take Post- 
Graduate Course At South High 
G. A. A. 3; House of Rep. 4. 

J. D. Long, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Make High- 
est Average In High School 
Once 
Class Sec. 1; Band 1. 2. 3. 4. 5: 
V. Pres. 5; Jr. Hi-Y 1, 2; Sec. 2; 
Sr. Hi-Y 3, 4. 5; Met. Sci. Club 
4, 5; Sec. 5; Track 3; Ushers Club 
3, 4, 5. 

Charles L. Martin, Jr. 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Like My 

Father 
Class Pres. 1, 2, 3, 4; House of 
Rep. 2; Hi-Y 1, 2, 3. 4; Pres. 2, 3, 
4; Cheerleader 3, 4; Monogram 4; 
Head Cheerleader 4; Band 1, 2, 3. 
4; Older Boys Conference 4; Treas. 
4; State Music Contest 3, 4; Ushers 
Club 3. 4; Dram. Club 3; Clarinet 
Trio 4; Solo and Ensemble Club 4. 



Page one hundred thirty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Clyde Lee Martin 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Shot 



Big 



Jack M. May, Jr. 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Mugge't 

Fitter 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2. 4. 

Eoline McClanny 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Become 
An Accomplished Pianist 
New Bern High School 1, 2; Raleigh 
"High School 2. 3; Washington High 
School 3, 4; Goldsboro High School 
4. 



John William Massey 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be A 

Bachelor 

Council 1 . 

John Allen May, Jr. 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire^ — To Win The 

Nobel Prize Award In Chemistry 

Dram. Club 3, 4; Met. Sci. Club 3. 

4; Basketball 4. 

Dorothy McCuiston 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Become A 

Laboratory Technician 

Etiquette Club 1, 4; Girls Wide 

Awake Club 1 ; Salem Academy 3. 



J. Lewis Masten 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Become A 

Famous Chemist 
South High 1. 2; Board Member 2; 
Traffic Dept. 2; Basketball 3, 4; Met. 
Sci. Club 3. 4. 



Robert McArthur 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Wo 



Football 



an s Man 
Basketball 3, 



4. 



Verona McGowan 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Discover A 

New World 
Walkertown High 1, 2; Lib. Staff 3; 
Debaters Club 3; Needlework Club 
3; Etiquette Club 4; Typist "Pine 
Whispers" 4; Typist "Black and 
Gold" 4; G. R. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred thirty-five 




Lawrence Powell 
Mcintosh 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Six Feet 

Tall 
Boosters 1; V. Pres. 1; Treas. Stu- 
dent Council 2; Etiquette Club 4; 
Football 1, 2. 

Shade Morris Mecum 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play Hall- 
back 
Track 2. 

Martha Louise Merritt 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Travel The 

Earth 
Etiquette Club 4; Hobby Club 1; 
Spanish Club 3. 



Gwyn McNeil 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Kill A 
Rabbit 
Salesmanship Club 1: Track 1; Ath- 
letics Club 2; Class Baseball 1; Glee 
Club 5. 



Mary Jane Meinung 

General Course 

Suppressed Deisire—To Be A 

Doctor 



Harold Miller 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Friend 

To Man 
Print. Club 3, 4; Second Band 4. 



Ralph McNeil 

Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Play Basket- 
ball Like An Expert 
House of Rep. 1, 2, 3; Boosters 1. 
2; Basketball 3, 4; Football 3. 



Martha Redding Menden- 
hall 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Go To Duke 

Readers Digest Club 3, 4; Latin 



Club 3; Childrens 
1, 2, 3. 4. 



Home Basketbal 



James Leslie Mitchell, Jr. 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Succeed In 

Business 



Page one hundred thirty-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Katherine Ann Mock 
Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Travel 
Glee Club 1; G. R. 1; Knitting Club 
3; Music Club '4. 

Dorothy Morris 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire~To Work In 

An Office 

G. R. 2, 3. 4; Office Page Club 4. 

Paul R. Morris 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Propose To 

A Good-Looking Lady 
Track 1, 2; Baseball 4, 



Edna Katharine Mont- 
gomery 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — Reussir 

Sr. Marshall 3; Harlequin Club 5. 

Emily Frances Dawn 
Morris 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Torch 

Singer 
Dram. Club 3; House of Rep. 1, 2; 
Spanish Club 3; Office Page Club 4. 

Ruth Elizabeth Moser 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A News 

Hound 
G. R. 2, 3; Needlework Club 3. 



John Wilson Moore 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Raise Bees 

Without Getting Stung 
Jr. Hi-Y 3: Sec. 3: Sr. Hi-Y 1: 
Track 3. 4; Cross Country 3; Mgr. 
4; Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; Met. Sci. 
Club 4. 

Lena Winston Morris 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — I Can't Tell 
Knitter's Club 3; Dram. Club 3; G. 
R. 4; Etiquette Club 4. 

Dorothy Louise Mullen 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Speak My 

Mind 

G. R. 2, 3, 4; V. Pres. 4; G. R. 

Conference Delegate 4; Nat'l Hon. 

Soc. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred thirty-seven 




Kathleen S. Murray 





General Course 




Suppressed Desire — To Be 
Contented 


N. 
2; 


C. Club 1, 2; "Pine Whispers 
Basketball 1. 



Rogar Lee Norman 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A 
Traveling Salesman 
Student Council 1, 3. 4; Met. Sci. 
Club 3; Children's Home Football 
1, 2, 3, 4: Basketball I. 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

William C. Park 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be In Love 

With A Girl Who Loves Me 
Band 1, 2, 3; Football 4. 5. 



Richard Neely 

Industrial Arts Course 

Suppressed Desire—To Be A 

Printer 

Children's Home Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Children's Home Basketball 2, 3, 4; 

Children's Home Baseball 3, 4. 



James Nowell 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Punctuate A 

Sentence Correctlu 
Cashier 1; House of Rep. 2; Science 
Club 3. 



Charlotte Hart Parker 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be An Old 

Maid School Teacher 
South High 1; Arts and Crafts Club 
3; Readers Digest Club 4; G. R. 4. 



Elizabeth B. Nelson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — Can't Put It In 

This Book 
Soccer 3; Mgr. Baseball 3; Etiquette 
Club 4; G. R. 4. 



Wesley Pack 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed De)sire — To Be Treasurer 

Of u. s. 

Basketball 1. 2; Track 2: Debaters 
Club 3; Etiquette Club 4; Travel 
Club 3: Football 1. 



Hewes Parrish 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Beat Glenn 

Cunningham 
Football 2. 3. 5; Track 2. 3; Sr. 
Hi-Y 4; French Club 3; Etiquette 
Club 5. 



Page one hundred thirty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




John Peddicord 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be A 

Mugget Dealer 

Squirt Football 1; Etiquette Club 5; 

Spanish Club 4. 



Margaret Weleska 
Pegram 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Be Able To 
Look Over Tom Thumb's Shoulder 
G. R. 2, 3, 4; Inter-Club Council 
4; Glee Club 3; Debaters Club 4; 
Play Tournament 3; Nat'I Hon. Soc. 
4. 

Carl Austin Peoples 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Graduate 



Juanita Peebles 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Cross The 
Ocean 
Readers Digest Club 3. 

Ruth D. Pegram 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Get The 

Most Out of Life 

Glee Club 3; Spanish Club 3; G. R. 

2. 3, 4. 

Donald Perry 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Become A 
Second Bobby Jones 
Boosters 1, 2; Squirt Football 1; Golf 
1. 2, 3, 4, 5; Etiquette Club 5; 
Ushers Club 3. 4, 5; Bus. Staff 
"Pine Whispers' 4, 5; Sr. Hi-Y 4, 
5. 



Chris Peet 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Successful 
Football 2, 3, 4,5; Baseball 5; Boos- 
ter Club 2, 3; Nature 4; Etiquette 5. 

William Robert Pendry 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Go Fox 
Hunting 
Aero. Club 3. 

Douglas Peterson, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Break The 
Bank At Monte Carlo 
Boosters 1, 2; International Rela- 
tions Club 1 ; Stamp Club 2; Eti- 
quette Club 5; Ushers Club 3. 4, 5; 
S. 1. P. A. 5: Bus. Staff "Pine 
Whispers" 5; (r- Hi-Y 2, 3; Hi-Y 
5: Readers Digest Club 4: House of 
Rep. 5. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred thirty-nine 




John Prevost 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Designing 

Engineer 
Football 2, 3. 4; Track 3, 4; Class 
Treas. 3; House of Rep. 1 : Boosters 
1, 2. 



D. L. Reavis 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Swim The 

Ocean 
Latin Club 3. 



Lillian Carolyn Renegar 

Household Arts Course 

Suppressed Desire~To Be A 

Teacher In The Home Economics 

Department 



Ray Proctor 



Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Hobo 
Track 3, 4; Travel Club 1; Dram. 
Club 4; Class Sec. 3. 



Lucy Mae Reavis 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire^To Be Drum 
Major Of The Largest Band 
In The U. S. 
South High 1, 2; Traffic Dept. 1. 2 
Dram. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Board Mem- 
ber 2; Lost and Found Dept. 2 
Knitting Club 3: "Look Who's 
Here" 3; "Jealousy Plays A Part" 
3: Etiquette Club 4: Class Sec. 2 
Fine Arts Club 3; Class Treas. 2 
4; Dancing Club 2, 3; Hit Pin Team 
2; Capt, 2; Class Soccer 3; Capt. 3. 



John Elbert Reynolds 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make $100 

A Week 
Print. Club 4; Pres. 4; Treas. 2; 
V. Pres. 3; Science Club 2; Pres. 2. 



Doris Ragland 

Household Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire — To See An 
Army-Navy Football Came 
G. A. A. 2. 



David Reid 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire} — To Be President 
N. C. Club 1; Boosters 1: House of 
Rep. 3; Baseball Mgr. 5; Ushers 
Club 5. 



Eloise Lorraine Rhoades 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be An 
Orchestra Leader 
G. R. 2. 3. 4; Readers Digest Club 
3; Dram. Club 3; "Segya" 3; Eti- 
quette Club 4. 



Page one hundred forty 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Walter A. Richards 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Play A Sax 

Like Rudy 
Met. Sci. Club 3; Music Club 4; 
Band 3, 4. 



Hilda Roush 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Take Up 

Latin And Pass It 

Girls Wide Awake Club 1; Baseball 

2; Lib. Staff 2, 3, 4; Book Club 4. 



Louise M. Robbins 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire-— To Be A 
Contralto 
House of Rep. 2, 3; Glee Club 4. 



Kenneth Royal 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Make "A" 

On English Under Miss 

Mary Wiley 

Baseball 3; Mgr. Children's Home 

Football 3, 4; Mgr. Basketball 3. 4. 



Jim Robinson 

Scientific Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be A 

Second Fred Astaire 



Joyce Powell Safrit 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Delsire — To Write Books 

Like Lloyd C. Douglas 
"Segya" 3; "Pine Whispers" 4; 
G. R. 3. 4; Publicity Chair. 4; Eti- 
quette Club 4; Nat'l Hon. Soc 4. 



Helen Sams 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Sixteen 
Etiquette Club 4; Soccer 3. 



Watson G. Scott 

General Course 
Suppressed Delsire— -To Finish 
School 
House of Rep. 4: Model Airplane 
Club 2; Class V. Pres 2; Class Sec. 
3; Scrub Football 1; Science Club 
1; Stamp Club 1. 



Dorothy Sechrist 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A Nurse 
Needlework Club 3; G. R. 4. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred forty-one 




Harry G. Sharp, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Make A 
Touchdown 
Jr. Hi-Y 2, 3; Sr. Hi-Y 4, 5; Foot- 
ball 5: Band 1 . 2, 3, 4, 5; Met. Sci. 
Club 4, 5; Ushers Club 3, 4. 5: 
Ass't. Chief Usher 5; "Pine Whis- 
pers" 4; Quill and Scroll 4, 5. 

R. Clay Shields 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be A Beau 

Brummell 
North High 1, 2; Debating 3, 4; 
Dram. Club 3. 4, 5; Readers D,- 
gest Club 5; House of Rep. 5; Ush- 
ers Club 4, 5; Executive Mem. Coun- 
cil 5; "China Silk" 2; Glee Club 1, 
2; Art Club 2; Class Sec. 2; But,. 
Mgr. "Thank You Doctor," "Larn- 
in," "The Rector" 5. 

Christian Siewers 
Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Win A 
Football Game 
Student Body Pres. 4; Sec. 3: Hi-Y 
3, 4; V. Pres. 3; Sgt. at Arms 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3. 4; Capt. 4; Mono- 
gram Club 2, 3, 4; "South in Son- 
ora" 3: Ushers 4; Track 4; Honorary 
Member Club Reviersco 3. 



Elizabeth Hope Shermer 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Dance Like 

Ginger Rogers 
Travel Club 3; Dram. Club 3; "The 
Necklace" 3; Etiquette Club 4. 

Helen Margaret Shoaf 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Sing And 

P/ay 

Needlework Club 3. 

Robert W. Sills, Jr. 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Learn How 

To Truck 
International Relationship Club 1; 
Stunt Night 1; Track 4; Ushers 
Club 5; Met. Sci. Club 5. 



Vivian Shermer 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be 
President of U. S. 
North High I, 2, 3; Newspaper 
Staff 1, 2; Knitting Club 1, 2, 3; 
Rhythmic Club 1. 2; Class Baseball 
1. 2; Class Soccer 1, 2; Class Bas- 
ketball 1, 2. 



Richard Edmund Shore 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Succeed In 

Whatever 1 Undertake 
House of Rep. 1. 3; Basketball 4, 
5; Tennis 4, 5; Hi-Y 4, 5; Band 5: 
Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4, 5. 



Margaret Lynch Simpson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Wear A 
Smaller Size Shoe 
Nafl. Hon. Soc. 4; Dram. Club 3. 
4; Readers Digest Club 4; "Look 
Who's Here" 3; "Jealousy Plays A 
Part" 3: "Thank You, Doctor" 4; 
Lib. Page 4. 



Page one hundred forty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Dorothy Estelle Sink 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make Up 
My Mind 
South High 1; Dram. Club 3; De- 
baters Club 3; Chief Marshall 3; 
Etiquette Club 4; V. Pres. 4; G. R. 
4. 

Ruth L. Smith 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Be Happy 
Hobby Club 1; G. R. 2. 3, 4; Span- 
ish Club 3; Etiquette Club 4. 

Herschell Francis Snuggs 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Great 

Surgeon 
Boosters 1, 2: "South in Sonora" 4; 
Glee Club 4. 5; Squirt Football 1, 
2; Scrub Football 5: Latin Club 4; 
Solo Club 5; Dram. Club 4; Boys 
Etiquette Club 3; Debaters Club 2, 
3; Fencing 5. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Wilma Virginia Sink 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Become A 
Doctor 
G. R. 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 3; Eti- 
quette Club 4; "Jealousy Plays A 
Part" 3. 

Samuel H. Smith 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — I'd Rather Lead 

A Band 
Dram. Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Spanish Club 4; Quill 
and Scroll 4. 5; Pres. 4; Treas. 5; 
"Pine Whispers" 3, 5; "Segya" 4; 
Managing Editor 4; "Black and 
Gold" 3. 4, 5;. Asso. Editor 4; Man- 
aging Editor 5: "The Merchant of 
Venice" 2; "Look Who's Here" 4; 
"The Wedding" 4; "The Dweller in 
the Darkness" 5; "Thank You. Doc- 
tor" 5; "The Demons" 2; "Wash- 
ington's Wedding" 2; "Sham" 2; 
Science Club 1, 2; "China Silk" 2; 
S. I. P. A. 4. 5: Readers Digest 
Club 5; Pres. 5; Dem. Mgr. 5. 



Lois Snyder 



Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire- — To Be Able To 

Drive With My Feet Together 
House of Rep. 2; Chief Marshall 3; 
Knitters Club 3; V. Pres. 3; Dram. 
Club 4; Etiquette Club 4: G. R. 3. 



Helen Smith 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Become A 

Stenographer 
Girl Reserves 1 . 2; Knitting Club 
3; North High 2. 



Emily Smither 

Modern Language Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be Able 

To Drive 

Salem Academy 2. 3; Etiquette Club 

4. 



Vivian Snyder 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go To 
China 
Knitting Club 3. 



Page one hundred forty-three 




Rachel L. Spainhour 

Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Have A 
Good Time 
G. R. 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 3; Eti- 
quette Club 4. 

Norman V. Stockton, Jr. 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be An 

Aviator 

Hi-Y 4; Nat'l. Hon. Soc. 4; "Black 

and Gold" Bus. Staff 4; Band 4; 



Margaret Lucille Surratt 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Go To The 

Hawaiian Islands 
Nature Club 4; Class Basketball 1. 



Billy Sprunt 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire,— To Be A 

Great Doctor 

Football 2. 3, 4; Met. Sci. Club 3; 

Hi-Y 3, 4.' 



Mary Jane Stuart 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Get My 
B. S. Degree In College 
Dram. Club 3; Knitting Club 3. 

Mildred Swain 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire—To Ride Up 
And Down On The Curtain In 
Chapel While Somebody Pulls 
The Ropes 
Boosters 1; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Ten- 
nis 3; G. A. A. 3, 4; Treas. 3; 
Pres. 4; "Black and Gold" 1. 2; 
"Pine Whispers" 2; Soccer 3; Girls 
Monogram Club 2. 



James Earl Stanford 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be Able To 

Teach Like Miss Watts 
Etiquette Club 4. 

Mary Lou Summers 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be The 
Second Amelia Earhart 
North High 1; Soccer 1; Girls Wide 
Awake Club 2; G. A. A. 1, 2; Trav- 
el Club 3; G. R. 1. 

Mildred Hulett Tatum 

Latin Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be An 

Author 

House of Rep. 1; Etiquette Club 4. 



Page one hundred forty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Bertha Fay Teichman 

Commercial Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Have A 

Jazz Band Like Benny Goodman 

Band 3, 4; Soccer 3; Basketball 3, 

4; G. A. A. 3, 4; G. R. 4; Girls 

Monogram Club 3, 4. 



Hope Gwendolyn Tilley 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire-— To Own A 
Circus 
Knitting Club 3; Dram. Club 3. 

Betsey Graham Trotter 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Play Hooky 
House of Rep. 2; Dram. Club 3: 
Travel Club 3; Pres. 3; Tennis 3; 
French Club 4. 



Edna L. Thomas 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To See 
Kathleen Married 
G. A. A. 3; Music 4. 



Carl Daniel Totherow 

Scientific Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Graduate 

Met. Sci. Club 3; Track 2; Football 

2; Basketball 2, 4; Mgr. Basketball 

3. 



Joe Tucker 



Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Get Out 0[ 

School 
Football Mgr. 3; Club Reviersco 3; 
Boosters 2; Etiquette Club 4. 



Bobby Thorpe 

Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Be A Base- 
ball Owner Like Tom Yawkey 



Elinor Majorie Trent 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be A Tight 

Rope Walker 
G. R. 2, 3, 4; Dram. Club. 3; "Seg- 
ya" 3: Readers Digest Club 3; "Pine 
Whispers" 4; Etiquette Club 4. 

Mary Tucker 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Have An 

Orchestra Like George Hall's 
Lewisville High I. 2; Class Sec. 1; 
Class Pres. 2;' Glee Club 1, 2; Dram. 
Club 1, 2. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred forty-five 




William D. Tudor 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be The First 
Person To Lejave And Return To 
This Earth In A Rocket Plane 
Radio Club 1. 2; House of Rep. 1. 
2, 3; Model Airplane Club 2, 3: 
Boys Etiquette Club 2; Ushers Club 

4, 5, 6; Boosters 3, 4; Sr. Hi-Y 

5, 6; Pioneer Club 3, 4: "Segya" 5: 
"Segya" Bus. Staff 5; Bus. Mgr. 
"Pine Whispers" 6; "Black and 
Gold" 5; Chairman Mock Election 
for Pres. U. S. 6; Mgr. Baseball 5. 



Sidney Vernon 

Industrial Arts Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Return A 
Punt Like "Honey Boy" Hackney 
Scrub Football 3. 4. 



Myrtle Hutton Wadford 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Accomplish 

Something Wotth While 



Thomas Huske Vance 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Travel Asia 
Nature Club 1; Jr. Hi-Y 1, 2; Met. 
Sci. Club 4, 5. 

William Vogler, Jr. 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire— Nothing Special 
Track 1, 2. 3, 4; Basketball 2. 3; 
Football 4; Band 1, 2, 3. 4; Mono- 
gram Club 2. 

Frances Waggoner 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Be Dictator 

Of Ethiopia 
Etiquette Club 4; Boosters 2; House 
of Rep. 1- Sr. Marshall 3, 4; Girls 
Wide Awake I. 



Ruby Mae Vaughn 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Own A 

Pontiac 

Hobby Club 1; Etiquette Club 1: 

G. R. 2. 



Margaret Elizabeth Voss 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Be The 

Only One 

Handiwork Club 3; Readers Digest 

Club 4; G. R. 3, 4. 



Josephine Walker 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Live In A 

Trailer 

G. R. 3, 4; Readers Digest Club 4; 

Latin Club 3. 



Page one hundred forty-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 




Norma Jane Weatherman Ella Elizabeth Weaver 



Modern Language Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Have Pedro 
Spanish Club 3; Lib. Page 1, 2, 3. 
4; Basketball 2; G. R. 4; Dram. 
Club 3. 



James Thomas Whisonant 

Scientific Course 
Suppressed Desire— To Become A 
Radio Engineer 
Class Baseball 1; Debaters Club 2. 
3, 4; Dram. Club 4; Debating Squad 
3, 4; Declamation Contest 3. 4; Mgr. 
Debating Team 4. 

Mary Frank Wilkerson 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire—To Reach My 

Certain Goal 

Knitting Club 3; G. R. 4; Etiquette 

Club 4. 



Household Arts Course 

Suppressed Desire — To Have T ivo 

Lunch Periods 



Henry Adnion Whitaker 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Tote A Gun 

Like Buck Jones 
Air-Craft Club 3. 



Rae Frances Williams 

Household Arts Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Be First 

Lady 

Dram. Club 1; House of Rep, 1; 

G. R. 3. 



Margaret Welfare 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make My 
Debut In The Metropolitan Opera 

Salem Academy 2; Etiquette Club 4; 

Music Club 3. 



Thomas Whiteheart 

General Course 

Suppressed Desire— To Play In Mr. 

Pf old's Band 

Leon de Ward Wilson 

General Course 
Suppressed Desire — To Make People 

Happy 
House of Rep. 1, 2; Travel Club 4; 
Dram. Club 3. 4; Glee Club 3. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred forty-seven 




Lawson Withers 

Latin Course 
Suppressed Desire^To Be A 
Political Boss 
Jr. Hi-Y 2; Debaters Club 4, 5; V. 
Pres. 4; Pres. 5; Stamp Club 1; 
Nat'l Hon. Soc. 4. 5; Treas. 4; Sec. 
5; Quill and Scroll 4, 5; V. Pres. 
5; Dram. Club 4; S. I. P. A. 5; 
Winner Current Events Contest 5; 
Mock Presidential Election 5: "Black 
and Gold" 4, 5; Organization Edi- 
tor 4; Senior Editor 5; "Segya" 4; 
Asso. Editor 4: "Pine Whispers" 5; 
Editor-in-Chief 5; Sectional Winner 
Quill and Scroll Contest 5; Winner 
Roosevelt Inaugural Tour Competi- 
tion 5. 



Mary Virginia Young 

Commercial Course 
Suppressed Desire-- To Enjoy 
Everything 
House of Rep. 1; Class Treas. 3. 



OTHER SENIORS 



Elizabeth Carroll 

General Course 



Eva Gray Denny 

General Course 



Joseph Hensdale 

General Course 



Richard Odell Lawrence 

Industrial Arts Course 



George L. McKnight 

Industrial Arts Course 



Geraldine D. Patterson 

Commercial Course 



Frances Roberts 

Household Arts Course 



Katherine Rudacil 

Household Arts Course 



Johnnie W. Warren 

Latin Course 



Page one hundred forty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



3n dkmarimn 

SARAH DELANO PHILLIPS 

July 18, 1921 
February 25, 1936 



^*S^=^cfe^ 



JS2Z 




125L 



*2a=»<^*„ 



JUNE CLASS POEM 

Lawson Withers, Poet 

As we wander through life's halls, 
suddenly we reach a gate; 
Out it leads, on by the walls 
that for years have kept us one — 
one great body full of fun, 
jealousy, sorrow, joy and hate. 
Out we pass; we know not where. 

Under all this sham of laughter, 

anxious thoughts disturb our mind. 
Unemployment! Shame! Disaster! 
What chance have we to survive? 
Do not make us pass the gate! 

Someone has said that it is best 

to know not what the future holds, 
But pleasant pasts are as a guest— 
ever enjoyed, but forever gone. 

Then courage— Things are never as dark as painted. 
So let's accept the new adventure 
with a spirit by fear not tainted, 
but confident of success and pleasure. 
We must leave the four, short years. 
They were great, but they are past. 



Page one hundred fifty 



BLACK AND GOLD 



■ 








O fa 




JUNE SUPERLATIVES 



MOST POPULAR 

Rosemary Cody 
Charles Martin 

BEST LOOKING 

Dorothy McCuiston 
Richard Cobb 



BIGGEST FLIRTS 

Margaret Welfare 
Bill Vogler 



BEST ALL ROUND 

Rosemary Cody 
Christian Siewers 



MOST ATHLETIC MOST INTELLECTUAL 



Rosemary Cody 
Steve Forrest 



Betty Burke 
Lawson Withers 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred fifty-one 



•^S^x-'-iCs- 



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HISTORY OF JUNE CLASS, 1937 



As we near the close of our four 
years in high school, the words of the 
old song: 

"Along the River of Time we glide, 

The swiftly flowing resistless tide." 
brings to our minds the thought that in 
many ways our Class of 1937 is like a 
river rolling through the country of high 
school, not a mighty river, as Carlyle 
designates the Shakespeares and Miltons 
in the country of Thought, but a modest 
stream doing its best to enrich student 
life. 

As a tiny rivulet, its springs deep 
in the soil of primary and grammar 
schools, we as a freshman class found our 
course headed toward the borderlands of 
the Richard J. Reynolds field of endeav- 
or. Coming as we did from various 
schools, we were indeed as "a babbling 
brook from a thousand different sources." 

Joyously we rushed on our way 
through our first year in high school 
land, gaining volume and strength as 
the days sped by. Sometimes we found 
the banks high that enclosed us — rules 
and regulations of Student Council, strict- 
er grading of papers than we had been 
accustomed to, daily testings and drills; 
sometimes we found our way choked 
by weeds of ignorance of high school 
ways; time and again the rocks of Eng- 
lish grammar, Latin infinitives, originals in 
algebra threatened to impede our way; 
but, like Tennyson's brook, going on 
forever, widening here, narrowing there, 
wecame at length to the vale of Sopho- 
more days. 

Crowded in as we were between the 
high hills of Freshman sauciness and 
Junior assurance, we found our way dif- 
ficult indeed and slow of progress. 

From our entrance upon high school 
territory having carried our share of the 
small boats of student activities, during 
our second year we were proud to dis- 
play upon the bosom of our sophomore 
river a greater variety of craft — more 
active participation in Council and 



House, wider range of club interests, 
athletics, introduction into the delights 
of band, play-acting, and debating. 

By the time our course had rounded in- 
to Junior channels, the influence of our 
river of learning was beginning to be felt 
in all the surrounding fields of high school 
life; the eager freshmen came to sip of 
our sparkling waters of information; the 
sophomores deigned to take notice of 
the varied and valued cargoes displayed 
on our small crafts: high speed in typing, 
prizes in journalistic work, athletic starr- 
ing; even the lofty seniors occasionally 
strolled down to our flowering banks. 

Through the devious windings of our 
freshman, sophomore' and junior years, 
one clear song our river sang: "ON! ON! 
to the wide meadows of senior privileg- 
es!" And high above the other voices 
sounded the glad notes of our thrice-cho- 
sen leader, Charles Martin. 

At length, into the deeper channel of 
senior year swept our sparkling river. 
On either side stretched the broad mea- 
dows of influence, "watered by a thou- 
sand shining rills." Crowned with gar- 
lands of praise, senior crafts plied up 
and down our broad river — crafts of pub- 
lications, piloted by Lawson Withers, 
Sam Smith, Mildred Davis, Peggy Dean, 
Paul Early; of sports, bearing the ban- 
ners of Bill Vogler, Steve Forrest, Christ- 
ian Siewers, Leonard Darnell, Rosemary 
Cody, Mildred Swain, Elizabeth Carroll; 
of Dramatics starred by Bob Cohn and 
Margaret Simpson. Amidst busy crafts 
bearing daily lessons, senior responsibilit- 
ies, grind on the athletic field, in the de- 
bating hall, and behind the foot-lights 
of the auditorium, lighter skiffs carried 
cargoes on Junior-Senior dance, picnics, 
picture -takings, National Honor Society 
Initiation. 

"But the river has its end 
When it meets the ocean's tide," 
(Continued on page 202) 



Page one hundred fifty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 



v-tite^^ 




I / SI . .■> . +. 



PROPHECY OF JUNE CLASS 



It did not seem like a dream, neither 
did it appear as a mirage or an hallucina- 
tion; but then there's a possibility that 
it was, for my guide and I had been 
travelling continually for nine days in 
the vast waste and stabbing colds of the 
Gobi desert in inner Mongolia. I was 
on a scouting trip for Lord Henry Bun- 
combe-Powell who was to establish a 
base camp at a favorable location and 
then work out from it in his archaeologi- 
cal surveys. As yet we had not found 
a centrally located situation nor a favora- 
ble one. Lord Henry was a flighty old 
buzzard and would have stopped at noth- 
ing—not even my head. Woe unto me 
if the camp were not precisely as he 
wished it to be! But to my story 

Suddenly I saw upon the cheerless 
horizon a dense line of softly moving 
objects, appearing almost as swirling 
clouds of dust raised by some huge legion 
of horses, guns, and men. As my guide 
and I drew nearer, objects took shape — 
human beings, each at some particular 
work! I prodded my ragged little pony 
nearer. Ah, yes, they were people! 

"Look! Look there!" I screeched to 
my guide. "Do you see anything?" 

He turned, stared at me from those 
lean, immobile, almond eyes of his and 
replied. "No, master. See nothing." 

I drew my hand across my eyes, and 
when I withdrew it, that. . . that — I knew 
not what to call it — was still there. And 
this time I recognized these persons as 
persons whom I had once known, as per- 
sons whom I knew in high school! 

Side by side in endless line they 
stretched into the air, steel-like air, 
smacking of snow and dreary cold. I 
only recall a few as my memorv delights 
in playing pranks on my brain. We stop- 
ped our ponies. I gaped. 

There was Christian Siewers, massive 
but business-like, thumbing through a 
hoard of papers — big excutive personified, 
president of Siewers Amalgamated Steel 
Inc., according to a bronze plaque en 



the lavish desk. His office was all dra- 
peries, deep carpets, and gleaming furni- 
ture. 

Clad in a bathing suit of sky, clear 
blue was "Miss America of 1941" Rose- 
mary Cody, now probably a career- 
woman in modeling. 

I "oh-ed" and "ah-ed," and gasped. 
My guide was completely bewildered. 
He muttered a word that meant "ghost" 
and was silent. 

And then, attired in all the regalia of 
his office — derby, cigar, flaming tie, dia- 
monds^ — was Lawson Withers, politi- 
cal boss. Quite a character, He — 
Lawson Withers. 

Lucy Mae Reavis, the toast of R. J. R. 
in her day, now seemed satisfied to be 
a home-body and look after the kiddies. 
As I saw her she was bustling about a 
tiny kitchen, without doubt, preparing 
lunch for hubby-dear. Home! oh sweet, 
sweet home! 

And who should be next but Dick 
Cobb, Tom Edwards, Charles Martin, 
and Bill Vogler in a pose from their 
latest movie "Why Do People Call Me 
Handsome?" or was it "A Symphony in 
Masculine Beauty"? I do not remember. 

Then, with a gulp, I saw Sue Forrest, 
Madeleine Hayes, Dorothy Sink, Martha 
Johnston, and Catherine Harrell, still to- 
gether, mind you. It seemed that they 
were the backbone of the Society for 
the Prevention of Hot Radio Music. 

Before a microphone lounged Samuel 
X. Smith, Mr. X to you and to feminine 
hearts all over America who, by the way, 
had fallen in love with his ultra-ultra 
magnificent visage and voice, now master 
of ceremonies on the program advertising 
Nelson-Emerson — Libby and Sallie, you 
know— Neurotic Pink Liver Pills for the 
liver. 

Robed in leopard skins and fierce 
knives were Steve Forrest, Bill Sprunt, 
Jack Brown, Jim Gray, Ray Proctor, John 
Prcvost, Wilfred Hahn, Clay Shields, 

(Continued on page 212) 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred fifty three 



-o^^^^w- 



w£jo<ME*r, 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT JUNE CLASS REYNOLDS 

HIGH 



We, the senior class of the Richard 
Joshua Reynolds High School of this City 
of Winston-Salem, County of Forsyth, 
and State of North Carolina, being of 
sound mind and disposing memory, do 
hereby make, publish, and declare this 
our last will and testament, hereby re- 
voking all former wills, bequests, and 
devices of whatever nature by us made. 
Item I: That Claude R. Joyner be the 
sole executor, and no bonds exacted. 
In the beginning, we bequeath our 
good-will and loyalty to this school. 
Item II: To the Junior Class we be- 
queath the honor of being seniors, and, 
in fact, all of our rights, privileges, and 
notoriety which we have won legally 
or illegally. We further will them the 
superfluous amount of dignity and res- 
ervation, common to seniors, and also 
the front seats in the chapel rightfully 
belonging to us, and the privilege of 
marching out first. 
Item III: To the Sophomore Class we 
bequeath the right to violate deliber- 
ately any rule of precedent conflicting 
with their pleasure, will, or desire. We 
also will them the right to dictate what 
shall or shall not be, and to be con- 
sulted on any question of importance or 
vital interest, knowing that they con- 
stitute a walking encyclopedia. 
Item IV: To the Freshman Class we 
leave nothing, since in their own esti- 
mation they know all that is worth 
knowing and possess all that is worth 
possessing. 
Item V: To the faculty as a whole, we 
bequeath our undying gratitude and 
sincere appreciation for their earnest 
efforts in our behalf. 
Item VI: To Mr. Joyner we will a heart 
full of praise from each member of 
this graduating class. 
Item VII: We wish to leave with Miss 
Ford and Miss Whitley, our class 
sponsors, our apologies for causing so 
much trouble and time, and our ap- 



preciation for their helpful suggestions 
and all-round guidance. 
Item VIII: To the school library and 
librarians we express our gratitude for 
the better grades made possible by 
them. 

Item IX: To the Band and Mr. Pfohl 
we leave our thanks for the fine music 
and prestige to the school that was 
made possible by them. 
Item X: The following students do 
hereby bequeath some of their prized 
possessions and personal belongings to 
lucky undergraduates: 
Henry Bahnson wishes to will his mild 
and timid manners to Jack Davis. Christ- 
ian Siewers kindly leaves his football jer- 
sey to Dan Poe, so Dan won't have to 
misplace some other person's. Matt Dal- 
ton leaves that foolish grin to Wiley 
Crouse. Joe Belton leaves his lowest 
golf score to all of next year's golf hope- 
fuls. Mildred Davis wills her ability to 
be heard to Anne Pepper whom we 
would like to hear from. Paul Early 
leaves his long stride to Thorton Rose 
in order that Thorton may also be able to 
do a fifty second quarter. Shorty Parish 
leaves dear old Philbert to Reece Brock. 
Bob Cohn wills his so called "dramatic 
ability" to Roy English. Paul Lehman 
wills his grace and charm to Donald 
Welfare. Clay Shield leaves his child- 
ish antics with Tommy Lawrence. Char- 
les Martin graciously hands his execu- 
tive ability down to Moyer Hendrix. 
Sam King leaves his appetite and ability 
to get always two ice cream servings at 
all Hi-Y banquets to Jack Troutman. Bill 
Sprunt leaves his garralous nature to Le- 
roy Honeycut. Richard Shore leaves his 
style of wearing knickers to the fresh- 
men. Willie Hahn wills his dual per- 
sonality to Albert Wilson. Buck Hines 
leaves his nick name to anyone who 
proves tough enough to deserve it. J. D. 

(Continued on page 216) 



Page one hundred fifty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




1 IB CLASS 



9A CLASS 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred fifty-five 




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8A CLASS 

President J. C. Hughes Secretary Shirley Gosselin 

Vice-President Magdalene Hoots Treasurer Frances Harrison 

Council Mary Lucy Baynes 

HOME ROOM TEACHERS 

Miss Margaret Baily Miss Ethel Ervin Mr. W. F. Shealy 

Mr. C. C. Smith Mrs. Mildred Mitchell Miss Flossie Martin 

Mr. Hoyle Stinson Miss Ardena Morgan 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred lifty-nine 




8B CLASS 



CLASS SPONSORS 



11 A— Miss Ruth Ford 

Miss Pauline Whitley 
1 IB — Miss Annie Preston Heilig 
lOA^Miss Irene Jones 



lOB^Mrs. Odell Reich 
9A— Miss Faye Martin 
9B— Miss Ruth Troutman 
8A~Miss Flossie Martin 



8B— Miss Elizabeth Kapp 



Page one hundred sixty 



BLACK AND GOLD 




\L)%aanization± 




COUNCIL 

Moyer Hendrix, Christian Siewers, Steve Forrest, Sarah Bo wen, Jean Hodges, Rogar Norman, Leroy Honeycutt, 
Richard Bean, Clay Shields, Betty Sprunt, Margaret Whittington, Julian Daye, Jack Trotman, Mary Lucy Baynes, 

Carlyle Mangum, Veronica Angelo 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred sixty-three 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

Christian Siewers President 

Steve Forrest Vice President 

Sara Bowen Treasurer 

Moyer Hendrix Secretary- 



Richard Bean 
Moyer Hendrix 
Christian Siewers 
Stephen Forrest 
Clay Shields 



Miss Faye Martin 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

Betty Sprunt 
Margaret Whittington 
Julian Daye 
Jack Trotman 
Mary Lucy Baynes 
Carlyle Mangum 

FACULTY ADVISERS 
Miss Margaret Bailey 



Veronica Angelo 
Jean Hodges 
Sara Bowen 
Roger Norman 
Leroy Honneycutt 



Mr. B. B. Redmond 



Arthur Griswald 
Chester Shelton 
Harold Bland 
Steve Poolas 
Catherine Bacon 
Neal McGuire 
Dot Shealy 
Watt Martin 
Ednis Church 
Stanley Livengood 
Sarah Sullivan 
Prunell Moore 
Jennings Rogers 
Michael Angelo 
Adelaide Gorden 
Harold Spainhour 



Mrs. Katherine Reich 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Joe Belton Speaker 

Bill Cody Speaker Pro-Tern 

Bob Garvey Secretary 

Dick Cobb Treasurer 

Julian Daye Executive Mem. House 

Moyer Hendrix _ .Executive Mem. Cou. 

Julian Daye Rozellen Dalton 

Franklin Braswell Elizabeth Thompson 

Tom Edwards Virginia Clay 

Catherine Harrell Mary Louise Rhodes 

Dick Cobb Margaret Austin 

Douglas Peterson Frank Alspaugh 

Joe Belton Robert Chambers 

Marie Hege Phyllis Gordon 

Watson Scott Betty Yates 

Clay Shields Charlotte Griffith 

Elsie Little William Wommach 

Tom Holcomb Bill East 

Rose Lefkowitz R. M. Moody 

Bob Garvey Bill Edwards 

Bill Cody Archie Templeton 

Doris Simmons 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Mr. W. S. Buchanan Miss Mary Martin 



Page one hundred sixty-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 






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HOUSE OFFICERS 



Joe Belton, Bob Garvey, Richard Cobb, Julian Daye, Clay Shields, Moyer Hendrix 



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ODD NUMBER CHAPTER 
INTERNATIONAL QUILL AND SCROLL 



Page one hundred sixty-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 



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A 




W. Hahn T. Edwards, L. Withers, P. Early 

B. Burke, J. Gray, E. Bridges, N. Stockton, P. Bazemore, J. Belton 

R. Shore, A. Linder, A. Taylor, }. Brunt, P. Dean, M. Simpson 

C. Love, T. Lienbach, D. Daniel, J. Safrit, M. Angel, J. Moore 

S. Emerson, R. Bean, J. Dunning, H. Mildleton, R. Avery, G. Kimball 

D. Mullins, E. Tucker, R. Cody, W. Pegram 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred sixty-seven 




LIBRARIANS 

Ola Nicholson— Guilford College, University of N. C. 
Elizabeth Flynn — Duke University, University of N. C. 



LIBRARY STAFF ASSISTANTS 



Treva Hedgecock 
Louise Allen 
Evelyn Wright 
Sylvia Berlin 
Asalee Braddock 
Christine Love 
Faye Crump 
Mullins Ellerbee 
Hilda Roush 
Ruth Ashburn 
Norma Weatherman 
Bettie Roberts 
Nellie Foy 
Stroud Martin 
Ralph Scott 
Virginia Baker 



Dorothy Shealy 
Virginia Bare 
Mary Lucy Baynes 
Catherine Bacon 
Betty Lee Spainhour 
Alice Edens 
Mordicai Katzin 
Billy Rhodes 
John Johnson 
Evelyn Scholtes 
Bill Barber 
Rapheal Smullin 
Robert Sartin 
Ruth Wall 
June Batten 



Mary Nell Jay 
Cynthia Rhodes 
Ira Baity 
Jane Cannon 
Margaret Ernst 
Burton Hultz 
Irene Dowell 
Bernice Beaman 
Robert Lentz 
Robert Sosnik 
Neal McGuire 
Charles Vance 
Ralph Pegram 
Margaret Simpson 
Juanita Dunning 
Rebecca Thomasson 



Page one hundred sixty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 








AERONAUTICS CLUB 



DEBATERS CLUB 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred sixty-nine 




■ 



■'•■■' ■ 



P. Hendrix. Belton. Harrell, Early. M. Hendrix, Sharp. Mr. Buchanan. Hinkle, Grubbs, Ray, W. Vawter 

Robinson, Hanes, Sills. Fulp*Long. Borthwick, Piatt, Morton, Miller, Moore. Cofer. Whisonant, Bean, Mickey. 

Glenn, Honeycutt, Garvey, Montgomery, Hanes, T. Vance, Macklin, Paschal. F. Vance. Masten. Snider, Dalton, 

J. Vawter. 

METRIC SCIENCE CLUB 



Spring Semester 

Joe Belton 

V. H. Harrell 

Paul Early 

Leroy Honeycutt- 



W. S. Buchanan— Sponsor 

Fall Semester 

President Joe Belton 

Vice President Paul Hendrix 

Secretary J- D. Long 

Treasurer Leroy Honeycutt 

Sergeant-at-Arms V. H. Harrell 



Harry Sharp 

GROUP ONE— Paul Hendrix, Leader 

Richard Bean, James Conrad, Billy Grubbs, Richard Hanes, John Moore, Jim Vawter, 
Bill Miller, Joe Ray, James Mickey 

GROUP TWO— Jack May, Leader 

Bill Vawter, David Robinson, Langdon Montgomery, Aubrey Hanes, Wiley Crouse, 
Billy Glenn, Forrest Paschal, Frank Vance, Lewis Masten 

GROUP THREE-Marshall Fulp, Leader 

Moyer Hendrix, Teddy Borthwick, Billy Cofer, Sam Dalton, Bob Garvey, George 
Shelhorse, Thomas Whisonant, Fred Sapp, Albert Macklin 

GROUP FOUR— Tommy Vance. Leader 

George Hinkle, Roger Snyder, Charles White, Archie Taylor, Robert Sills, Perry 

Piatt, Ben Morton 



Page one hundred seventy 



BLACK AND GOLD 



, , • 









j 

First Row; Hendrix. Tudor, Sharp, Sills, Hendrix, Harrell, Second Row; Fulp. Martin, Belton, Cohin 
Peterson, Third Row; Lehman, Prevost, Long, King, Reid, Shields, Fourth Row; Early, Parrish, Perry, Forrest, 

Buchanan, sponsor, Siewers 

USHERS CLUB 

Paul Hendrix Chief Usher 

Marshall Fulp Assistant 

W. S. Buckanan Sponsor 

The Ushers Club furnishes ushers for The performances for which ushers 

all public performances in the Richard were furnished this year include a con- 

J. Reynolds Memorial Auditorium. Mem- cert by Madame Galli Curci, plays by 

bership in this club is attained by election the Reynolds Hi Players, the City-wide 

into the organization by a two-thirds one-act play tournament, and the High 

vote of its members, provided the appli- School Band Concert, 
cant's scholastic standing is satisfactory. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred seventy-one 




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SOPHOMORE AND JUNIOR HI-Y 



Page one hundred seventy-six 



BLACK AND GOLD 




BAND 



LATIN AND FRENCH CLUBS 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred seventy 




DEBATING TEAM 

Mack Alspaugh, Hazel Cobler. capt.. Arch Taylor. Watt Martin. George Lippard 




OFFICE PAGES 




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BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred seventy-nine 



HIGH SCHOOL PRINT SHOP 




PRINTING STUDENTS 



Back row— Leonard McDowell, Willi, 



Sho 



Charles Gibson, Norman Fulk, Joe Minor, Bryant Lee, A. H. Kimel, 
Richard Neely. Robert Hensley. Second row— Frederick Elrick, instructor. W. O. Everhart, Lester Messick, 
Harold Miller, Howard Austin, David Baker, Rufus Gentry, Bill Cranflll, Everett Tatum, John Reynolds. Front 
row-Allen Surratt, William Brendle, Delmont Cranflll, Robie Ferguson. Talmage Davis, Lee Ernst, Eugene Blue, 

Marvin Ellis, C. L. Manning, Jr. 



The vocational education program of 
the Reynolds High School Print Shop 
was carried on again this year on a full- 
time basis. The enrollment was approx- 
imately thirty each semester. Shelby Bo- 
ger was graduated in January, and A. H. 



Kimel, Richard Neely, John Reynolds 
and Harold Miller will be graduated in 
June. The night school class in print- 
ing was carried on as usual. 

Day school pupils received practice 
and instruction at nine commercial shops 




IN THE COMPOSING ROOM 



Page one hundred eighty 



BLACK AND GOLD 



HIGH SCHOOL PRINT SHOP 



that are participating in our vocational 
program. 

Special trips were arranged for day 
and night school pupils to visit shops of 
particular interest, including Winston 
Printing Co., Indera Mills printing de- 
partment, and Piedmont Engraving Co. 
of this city, and print shops and other 
places of interest in Kingsport, Tenn., 
Raleigh, N. C, and Roanoke, Va. 

Seventeen essays were written for the 
International Printing Ink Corporation's 
essay contest on "The Use of Color in 
Printing." The essay by Percy Gibson 
was judged the best in the local contest 
and was entered in the national contest 
where it ranked ninth among the entries 
from 243 schools. He, and other local 
contestants, won over $50.00 worth of 
books as prizes in this contest. 

Joe Minor has been chosen to receive 
the Printers Club award for his outstand- 
ing work in the shop this year. The 



award last year^also won by Minor — 
was a stainless steel composing stick en- 
graved with name and date. 

Publications this year included a news- 
paper, "The Wiley Post," printed for 
Wiley School, as well as "Pine Whis- 
pers," printed for the three high schools. 

This 1937 "Black and Gold," the larg- 
est high school annual ever published 
here, was the sixth to be produced in the 
high school print shop. With the excep- 
tion of making the covers and pebbling 
the inserts every printing and binding 
operation was done in the shop. Mr. Ar- 
nold McCall of the Winston Printing 
Company was secured for the cylinder 
press makeready; all other operations 
were handled by students and instructor. 
Every student in the shop had a part in 
the production of the book. The work 
of Joe Minor and Norman Fulk deserves 
special mention, but many of the other 
"•students did outstanding work. 




PRINTERS CLUB ACTIVITIES 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred eighty-one 




Margaret Whittington. Virginia Clay, Phyllis Morgan, Paul Harper, Thorton Rose, Chariie Mart 



CHEERLEADERS 



ALMA MATER 

Her portals tall and wide, May we more useful be, 

Call us from every side, Always our duty see, 

Our youthful steps to guide for future Strive on to victory through the golden 

days. rule. 

Her pleasant paths, her trees, May we always aspire 

Whisper courage through the breeze, To lift her banner higher 

Our greatest need she sees, Add to her fame and power, 

And leads always. God bless our school. 



Page one hundred eighty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 








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BOYS BASKETBALL 

Shore, Forrest, McNeil. Brown, Holt, Ford, Honeycutt. Perry, Crouse, Hahn, Angelo, Coach Shealy. 

TRACK 

Hendrix, Vogler, Hardesty, Poolas, J. Vawter, Reece, Honeycutt, Siewers, Prevost, Earnest, Brendle, B. Glenn, 

Polites, Snavely, Prichard, H. Glenn, Sprunt, tones. Moore, Phelps, Early, Carter, Straley, Foster, Hill, Stockton. 

Rose, Taylor, Macklin, Sherrill, Bahnson, Lehman, Pleasants, Gibson, Hamilton, Coach Kallam, Coach Brimley, 

Dalton, Wayne, Ebert, Kimel, Long, Hendrix, W. Vawter, Coach Redmond, Parrish, Killian, Abee, Park, 




GIRLS SOCCER 

Hodges, Pearce, Cody, Emerson, Little, Miss Knott, Forrest, White, Stallings, Dean, Davis, Sullivan, Harrell 

GIRLS BASKETBALL 

Pearce. Tesh, Cody, Emerson, Hodges, Harrell, Miss Knott. Forrest, Hutchison, Swain, Whitner, Little 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred eighty-seven 





TENNIS TEAM 



BASEBALL TEAM 



Page one hundred eighty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Hi 



s? *5n issiisi ss *k a? *S3C 




GIRLS SPRING SPORTS 



COACHES 

GIRLS TEAM 

Soccer — Miss Dorothy Knott 
Basketball — Miss Dorothy Knott 
Tennis — Miss Mary Martin 
Track — Miss Emma Kapp 
Baseball— Miss Dorothy Knott 

BOYS TEAM 

Football— Mr. Claude Smith, Mr. B. B. 

Redmond, Mr. W. F. Shealy 
Cross Country— Mr. J. D. Kallam 
Basketball— Mr.W. F. Shealy 
Baseball— Mr. Claude Smith 
Golf— Mr. Walker Barnette 
Track— Mr. Ralph Brimley, Mr. J. D. 

Kallam, Mr. B. B. Redmond 
Tennis — Mr. Walker Barnette 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred eighty-nine 




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Pegged 



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BLACK AND GOLD 








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BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred ninety-three 



The oldest center of higher education 
in this part of the state offers 
accredited courses in 



ARTS 

SCIENCES 

MUSIC 

TEACHER TRAINING 




For complete information, communicate with 

Dr. Howard E. Rondthaler, President, 

Salem College, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



Page one hundred ninety-four 



BLACK AND GOLD 




map By c.ki*& 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred ninety-five 



1 Wedding Invitations i 

| and Announcements i 
| Quality Lines By t 
| The Best Engravers I 

t Several new styles that are different and * 


j Cromer Brothers Co. 

J INC. 

j Wholesale Grocers 


I attractive. f 
ENGRAVED STATIONARY CARDS 1 


j Operators oj Pay Cash Grocery 


( HINKLE- LANCASTER { 


fj INSTITUTIONAL SUPPLIES 


| BOOK STORE ) 


( A SPECIALTY 


J 425 Trade St. Phone 8103 | 





K— * *— - 



PROPHECY OF JUNE CLASS 
(Continued from page 81) 
Miller and Edith Stack are doing fine 
as stenographers. 

After telling all he knows, Paul ambles 
away bidding his two dear friends a 
fond adieu. The clock in the center of 
the ballroom strikes twelve. Everyone 



has gone home except the mayor of the 
fair city and the carpenter representa- 
tive. The janitor comes in with his keys 
to lock up, and a very sorrowful good- 
night is said, for both the dear friends 
are parting—not until tomorrow at 
school — but until next week or next year 
out in life. 



►~ .* 



D. G. CRAVEN CO. 



4th Street Cor. Marshall 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Compliments of 

C. L. Sharp Co. 

Wholesale 
Fruits and Produce 



Compliments of 



B. F. Huntley Furniture Co. 

Specializing Quality 

Bed Room and Dining Room Furniture 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Page one hundred ninety-^ix 



BLACK AND GOLD 



*~^ 



»*_*•* 



FEMININE FASHIONS 



Davis and Cody, Inc. 

Insurance 



Z/tlaegAictzt Z7ila.vle. on 

205 West Fourth Street 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



op \ j Nissen Bldg. Telephone 8162 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 






►4» ■ ! ■< ■-■ — ■— . i—. .-. .-, ,-, .. 



NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOLS 
(Continued from page 72) 

In 1857, study of the Bible was started 
in schools. Some parents said that they 
would not buy readers. They said, also 
that the children could read and study 
the New Testament. 

The schools began to be overcrowded 
so the legislature passed a law saying 
that only children between the ages of 
6 and 20 could go to school. 

A simple incident in the life of Charles 
Brantly Aycock is worth remembering. 
One day he stood by his mother as she 
was asked to put her signature to some 
paper or document. She hesitated a mo- 
ment, and then confessed to the magis- 
trate that she could not write. The 
young boy saw his mother, with em- 
barrassment, make her mark, putting her 
finger at the tip of the pen stock while 
her name was written by another. Gov- 
ernor Aycock said in his later years that 



Compliments of a Friend 
on your 

Splendid Annual 



his incident made him, as a boy resolve 
that some day, God willing, he would 
do something for education in North 
Carolina. 

In 1907, the legislature authorized the 
establishment of rural high schools and 
appropriated $45,000 annually for their 
maintenance. In 1915, there was a public 
high school in every county in North 
Carolina. 

There are now over 4,000 buses which 
carry 265,000 children to 790 consolida- 
ted schools. These buses travel at least 
215,000 miles a day. 

The average salary of teachers in the 
public schools of North Carolina is $576 
a year. 

The per capita cost of each student 
in the public schools of North Carolina 
is $28.56. 

The teaching load in North Carolina 
is 33.7 pupils per teacher, the highest in 
the United States. 



►— * *».- 



Compliments 
THE 

Morris Plan Bank 



206 W. 4th St. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



.4 



Page one hundred ninety-seven 







1 



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4#m&%(**& 








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WE If 





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fi$^Pt/$^*>s**>*'- 














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Page one hundred ninety-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



DID YOU KNOW THAT: 

The total valuation of school property 
in North Carolina did not pass the mill- 
ion dollar mark till after 1900? 

The state constitution adopted in 1776 
contained a provision for education? 

The University of North Carolina is 
the oldest state-owned university in the 
U. S.? 

The first state superintendent was not 
appointed until 1853? 

The voters for the school tax in 1839 
had to vote for "school" or "no school" 
instead of for taxes? 

The average school terms during re- 
construction days were around two 
months? 

The first graded school in North Caro- 
lina was begun at Greensboro in 1870? 

The entire public school system did 
not close during the Civil War till the 
Union troops entered Raleigh in 1865? 



+-.. 



i 



The Basketeria Store 

"Food Service Supreme" 



4= 



851 Reynolda Road 
Phone 4123 We deliver 



I 



A Good Place To Trade 

Crescent Drug Co. 

A Complete 
Drug Store Service 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 






COMPLIMENTS 

of 



WINSTON 
STEAM LAUNDRY 

Launderers and Dry Cleaners 



Oldest, Largest, and Best 

Dial 4129 



.... ..;..;... 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page one hundred ninety-nine 



? 





/ncorporufec/ 
JEWELERS - STATIONERS — ENGRAVERS 




Manufacturers of 



Fine Stationery Engravin 

Wedding Invitations 
Announcements 

Class Rings, Pins and Fraternity Jewelry 
Diplomas and Invitations 



OFFICIAL JEWELERS 



to 



THE RICHARD J. REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL 



i 

Page two hundred 






— — — — — — — — * 

BLACK AND GOLD 







U.S.TIRES 




DOWNTOWN 
GARAGE 

' 'Friendly Service ' ' 

Next To Reynolds Building 



■$,*». 



Save on 
"Stop-and-Go" Driving 

Super-Shell Gasoline 
Kelly-Springfield Tires 



Quality Oil Company 

Marketers 






HAIR 

Brown hair, blonde hair, red hair, black 
hair, 

Slick hair, fuzzy hair, dry hair, oily hair, 
Straight hair, curley hair, short hair, long 
hair, 

Braided hair, rolled-up hair, messy hair, 

wavy hair. 
With all these types to choose from, 
Why be baldheaded? 

Eugenia Baynes 



Zinzendorf 

Laundry Co. 

Dry Cleaners Rug Cleaners 



Dial 5178 

CLEANS UP EVERYTHING 
Quality Laundry and Dry Cleaning 



*»< 



Compliments of 



SILVERS STORE 

Trade and Liberty Streets 
We Appreciate Your Patronage 

Sporting Goods 

GE Refrigerators — Radios and Appliances 

BOCOCK-STROUD COMPANY 






417 West 4th St. 






BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred one 



•!»»-• 



Compliments 
of 



WACHOVIA OIL 

COMPANY 



DISTRIBUTORS 

GULF OIL PRODUCTS 



JUNE HISTORY OF REYONLDS 
(Continued from page 152) 

and already the tide is in view— the des- 
tination of our four years' course — glad 
commencement day. 

With hearts gladdened with memories 
of happy comradeship, let's face the sea 
of life; with high endeavor, dauntless 
courage let us go forward, ever forward, 
on the swelling tide of opportunity- 




Cavalier Cafeteria 



West Side Court House 



GOOD FOOD 
REASONABLE PRICES 



*.~, 



i- 



ARDEN FARM 

GRADE A GUERNSEY DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Rhode Island Red and White Leghorn Chickens and Eggs 
Bronze Turkeys 

Delicious Table Delicacies Made from Fine Fruits Ripened to Full 
Flavor in the Warm Sunshine of the Old South 

Winston-Salem, N. C 



MONTALDO 



IMPORTERS 



Vacation Clofhes 

Golf Suits, Tennis Frocks, Beack Wear, Evening, and 
Dinner Gowns. 






Fage two hundred two 



BLACK AND GOLD 



INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST GO. 



ALL FORMS 
OF INSURANCE AND BONDS 



TELEPHONE 8 INI 



*.-. —♦ .-. —. ... ... _ — — __ — ,— .— . 

SOUTH JANUARY PROPHECY 
(Continued from page 31) 

"I can't find out where I can write to 
Reid Holder,'' Louise complained. 

"Why, I'm surprised you haven't heard 
about Reid Holder. He is part owner 
of the Buick Company in Detroit, Mich- 
igan, and has finally deserted the old T 
model." 

The latter part of my speech, however, 
fell on deaf ears. She looked up, her 
eyes widened, and the envelope fell to 
the floor unheeded. 

Louise had fainted. 



» — — ,-, ,., ,-, ,-, ,„ ,,, .-, .„ ... ..... 

WHITE SHOES FOR 
GRADUATION 

White — Brown and White 

See these beautiful shoes 
before buying. 

Medium and High Heels — 
$3.95 to $6.95 

Simmons Shoe Store 



» f i £ » 



444 Trade Street 



*— , 



"THE HOUSE OF FRIENDLINESS 



FROEBER PRODUCE CO. 



WHOLESALE ONLY 



FRUITS 



PRODUCTS 



PROVISIONS 



WONT YOU 

HAV-A-TAMPA 

CIGAR 

BENNETT- LEW ALLEN CO. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred three 



JANUARY CLASS HISTORY 
(Continued from page 115) 
continued to ebb and flow, and unsuc- 
cessfully the waves of examinations and 
questions attempted to overwhelm us. 

As the boat prepares to dock at Com- 
mencement wharf we feel the satisfaction 
of knowing that we have steered a 
straight course, and our goal is reached. 
We will continue to write logs of great- 
er adventure, and more wonderful dis- 
covery, for while the Voyage of High 
School Life is ending, the Voyage of 
Real Life is just beginning. 



-~ * 






Compliments 

of 



S. H. Kress 

and Company 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



*"*««>|4 



4———. 



Congratulations 

DOUGLAS 

Battery Mfg. Co. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



i 

\ 



133 N. MAIN ST. 



634 N. Trade St. 



Dial 4107 



BUICK AND PONTIAC 






Compliments 



OF 



Haines Hosiery Mills 

Company 



V 



! 

Page two hundred four 



i 



BLACK AND GOLD 



"N. C. is too poor not to educate her 
people—" Charles D. Mclver 

"To the lasting honor of N. C. her 
public schools survived the terrible shock 
of cruel war and the state which furnish- 
ed the greatest number and bravest troops 
did more than all the rest for the cause 
of popular education. When the last 
gun fired, the doors were still open and 
they numbered their pupils by the scores 
of thousands — " 

Calvin H. Wiley 
"The children must be taught to ap- 
preciate the opportunities offered at home 
and given the necessary training to im- 
prove them—" Calvin H. Wiley 

"My object is to form a system of 
education which will develop the faculties 
of the mind and improve the good dis- 
positions of the heart; which shall em- 
brace in its views both the rich and the 
poor — " 

Zebulon Baird Vance 
"The blind cannot lead the blind; mere 
literary attainments are not sufficient to 
make its possessor a successful instruct- 
or — " 

Zebulon Baird Vance 



oLe ZjYlavt 

WINSTON'S SHOW PLAGE 

FOR 

BEAUTIFUL FOOTWEAR 

42fi N. LIBERTY ST. 



I 
I 

i 



SUMMIT STREET 
PHARMACY 

"Foot Summit Street Hill" 

Plenty of parking space and 
plenty of room inside. A nice 
place to meet your friends. 

PROMPT AND COURTEOUS 

Curb Service 

Dial 2-1 144 



In the Language of Underwear 



TTlatio 

Made from Xfayu Yarn ^m 



Means 



Comfort, Durability, and Economy 

We are now making beautiful MAYO Athletic 
shirts, as well as light, medium, and heavy weight 
underwear, in every desired size. See your MAYO 
Dealer to-day and outfit yourself for spring and 

summer. 

We also make cheaper trimmed line of winter underwear of the 

following brands: MELOTEX and PIEDMONT 

Our MAYFAIR brand is used on Children's Waist Suits only. 

Made by Washington Mills Company 

Offices: Winston -Salem, N. C. 
Mills: Mayodan, N. C. 



BLACK AND GOLD Pa , ,.,,'.' 

rage two hundred five 



JANUARY PROPHECY 
(Continued from page 116) 

I also discovered a poem written by 
Harry Lee Nunn, titled "Education." 
Mr. B. Thorn. Woodall, President of 
Reynolds Tob. Co. made a statement 
concerning the rise in the price of chew- 
ing tobacco. 

More society articles read: "Misses 
Juanita Brinkley, Adele Cottingham, Em- 
ma Gray Davis, and Nancy Gabriel 
have returned from a tour of the western 
states." "Misses Ruth Hauser, Nell Fer- 
ebee, and Sunshine Dillon are leaving to- 
morrow for Florida to take a boat for 
Cuba." 

"Miss Barbara Limerick leaves tomor- 
row for Canada for extensive concert 
tours." "Misses Myrtle Nichols, Mary 
Reavis, Elizabeth Richardson, and Moz- 
elle Owens, are entertaining tonight for 
Miss Annie Pearl Tilley, winner in a 
National Dramatic Monologue Contest." 
"Misses Charlotte Tate, Nellie Rich- 
ardson, and Mary Frances Waller, are 
the leading players in the Twin City 
Tennis Tournament." 



By reading these items, my curiosity 
was amply satisfied as to the where- 
abouts and accomplishments of my High 
School friends. I still wonder, though, 
about the "Twin City Advertiser," for 
I have never heard of it before or since 
it fell from the sky to my feet. I am 
grateful to it, however, as the answer to 
that all important question, "What has 
become of the class of January, 1937?" 

c*V$§)(l|]@^ 



►~ 4. 



INSURANCE 



Brown-Ruffin Co. 

12 West Third St. 

Telephone 6070 






Chatham Products 

BLANKETS-HOMESPUNS-SUITS FOR MEN-TWEEDS 
SUITS FOR WOMEN-SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES 

The Name CHATHAM Is A Guarantee Of Quality 



CHATHAM 

WOOL BLANKETS 




Page two hundred six 



BLACK AND GOLD 



HIGHLIGHTS OF SCHOOL YEAR 

Oct. 22, 1936: Charlie Martin elected 
president of Senior Class for fourth con- 
secutive year. 

Nov. 5. 1936: Harry Lee Nunn, Jr. 
rolls up plurality to win in mock presi- 
dential election. 

Nov. 19, 1936: Paul Early presides 
at Southern Interscholastic Press Associ- 
ation Convention in Lexington, Va. 

Dec. 7, 1936: Lawson Withers, editor- 
in-chief of Pine Whispers, tied for first 
place in the Current Events Contest at 
the S. I. P. A. Convention at Washing- 
ton and Lee. Also Mr. J. G Alexander 
resigned to accept another position. Miss 
Melrose Hendrix succeeded Mr. Alexan- 
der. 

Dec. 17, 1936: Harlequin Club pre- 
sents "Bird's Christmas Carol." 

Jan. 14, 1937: George Lippard and 
Watt Martin will compose the affirma- 
tive team, and Mack Alspaugh and Ar- 
chie Taylor are on the negative team for 
the Debating Squad. 

January 28, 1937: Junior Class enter- 



4U- 




* , .+ 

tains graduating Seniors at annual dance 
at Country Club. 

Feb. 18, 1937: Mary Lucy and Eugenia 
Baynes lead school with highest averages 
for the entire semester. The 11BL home- 
room leads other classes in number of 
honor students for term. 

March 18, 1937: Superlatives are chos- 
en by Seniors in secret ballot vote. Rose- 
mary Cody holds three honors, Most 
Popular, Most Athletic, and Best-all- 
round. 




BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred seven 



SOUTH JANUARY WILL 1 




(Continued from page 32) 




Item XIX. To Florence Stafford, Doris 
Davis leaves her ability to appear be- 
fore an audience in that special "Davis ! 


Belk-Stevens j 


way". ! 
Item XX. To Frances Harrold, Frances ' 


Company j 


Perryman leaves her quiet, dignified 


Department Store 


manner. 




Item XXI. To Pauline Braddock, Vir- 


Corner Trade and Fifth | 


ginia Easter leaves her secretive and 




happy ways. 




Item XXII. To Louise Heath, Mildred 




Carroll leaves her "happy-go-lucky" 


■® i 


way in hopes that someday, she'll sit 


on top of the world with her. 




We hereby appoint as executor of 




this will Miss Daisy Lee Glasgow who 




has always been our guide and faithful 




friend. Signed and sealed this thirteenth 




day of January, 1937. 


Quality Merchandise At Economy \ 


Mildred Carroll, 


Prices For The School Boy I 


Testator 


And School Girl 


Witnesses, 




Popeye i j 


! Complh 

OF 


nents j 


| UNK 


JUE j 


| FURNITUR] 
i 

! M 

si 


E MAKERS | 


• 1 



Page two hundred eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 




CowrlKht. 1937. R. J. Reynolds Tob. Co. 




P. A. BRINGS YOU COOL, MILD, TASTY SMOKING 

Right on the back of the Prince Albert 
tin it says: "Prince Albert is prepared 
under the process discovered in mak- 
ing experiments to produce the most 
delightful and wholesome tobacco. " We 
think you'll agree once you try Prince 
Albert and discover the extra smok- 
ing joy it brings. Prince Albert is "crimp cut," with the 
"bite" removed, made of choice tobaccos. The special 
"crimp cut" insures cool smoking. Make Prince Albert 
your tobacco— get started on the joy road to contentment. 
P. A. is swell "makin's" for roll-your-own cigarettes too. 

Prince Albert 




pipefuls of fra- 



grant tobacco in every 
2-oz. tin of Prince Albert 

THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 





w 



WE LOVE US 



dignified 





JUST IVAN 



■■HI -M^l 




XD HAIDS 




OUT FOR 
LUNCH 



EXAM STU.DYING- 





OFF/CE TAIGt 



LOVELY SOUTH 



m Sw 






TRASH 



BASHFUL 
? 



Page two hundred ten 



BLACK AND GOLD 



•J*n- -» 



H* *, 



THE 



LIVE WIRE STORE 



Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Ready-to-wear, 

Millinery, Notions, Curtains, 

Draperies, Underwear, Corsets. 



I 

"Educate a man and you have educat- 
ed only one person; educate a mother 
and you educate a whole family — " 
Charles D. Mclver 

"Education is not a c h a r i t y but 
our chief duty as citizens. Education is 
simply our effort to give men life more 
abundantly — " C. D. Mclver 

"I believe in these people — our peo- 
ple whose development may be illimit- 
able. Wake up, my people." 

Walter Hines Page. i,,^ 

.$.«-. — , — ,. ^.^> ■■, ._■ ... ... ._. ._. ... ... ... ... .,. . 



For select foods call 

R. B. CRAWFORD & CO. 

A real service store 

Fancy Groceries, Fresh Vegetables 
Fine Fruit 

Dial 7116 858 West Fourth St. 



L M. WILLIAMS 

GROCERY CO. 

Fresh Meats and Fancy 

Groceries 

Dial 8164 Cor. Hawthorn & W. 1st 



Compliments 



Southern Dairies 

ICE CREAM, V. D. MILK, FANCY MOULDS 

Seal-Test Laboratory Systems, Inc. 

A Complete Dairy Service Throu&k Out the City- 
Telephone 4161-4162-4163 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Noland Company, Inc. 



PLUMBING — HEATING — MILL SUPPLIES 



Visit Our Show Room 



636 WEST FOURTH STREET 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred eleven 






Cable-Nelson 
Piano 

Noted for Beauty and Tone 



Jesse G. Bowen & Co. 



.-* 



Compliments of 
The 

Arcade Fashion 
Shop 

The Young Girl's Store 



JUNE CLASS PROPHECY 
(Continued from page 153) 
Roger Norman, Hewes Parrish, and 
Henry Bahnson executing a savage little 
dance in the middle of a vast stage- 
chorus boys all. 

Next were Helen Sams, Barbara Las- 
ley, Emily Smither, Gretchen Clapp, 
Mildred Davis, Lillian Alley, and Jean 
Hodges presiding over a magnificent 
room of glass and cromium plate, tea- 
chers in the charming College for Charm- 
ing Charmers. 

And look!— it was Buck Hines, bowing 
and scraping, clad in white tie and tails 
and saying cute things as "Good morning. 
I thought you'd gone to Europe.'' He 
seemed to be a host in a night club, the 
same night club in which Paul Harper 
was orchestra leader. 

Raising what is commonly called a 
"hullabaloo" were Donald Perry, Dick 
Joyce, Bob Cohn, Bill Tudor, Paul Early, 
Masten Dalton, members of the city Pot 
Exterminator Brigade. The method they 



were raising was one of efficiency and 
finesse — the poor rodents merely seated 
themselves, then expired. The Brigade 
was using its renowned voice power. 

And then, using his violin bow as a 
barton, was Sam Barbee, conductor of the 
Kernersville Killharmonic Symphony Or- 
chestra, featuring Morris Mecum and 
Mack Alspaugh as soloists. 

Striving to catch other familiar faces, 
I saw them suddenly fade and blend in- 
to the desert air — the vision was no 
more. My guide creaked impatiently in 
his saddle and mumbled disgustedly. I 
clucked to my pony. We proceeded on 
our weary, monotonus way — our weary 
way in the tiring desert. 



Them was the good ole days, you bet. 

A hundred years or so back. 
Thar warn't no homework then to get, 

Cause thar warn't no schools to be at. 
An' then the legislature met 

An' passed a new school measure. 
An education now we get, 

"Something we can treasure." 

Joyce Safrit 



The Anchor Company 

ConqxahiLaklom to 1Q37 £?/adi£i 

Start Your Business Lite Right 

By Always Being Style Right in Fashions from the Anchor Co. 

The Shopping Center of Winston-Salem 



Page two hundred twelve 



BLACK AND GOLD 



LAST WILL OF JUNE CLASS 
(Continued from page 46) 

Item XIII. To Mary Frances Wyatt, 
Lucile wills her popularity with the as- 
surance of many friends. 
Item XIV. To Richard Allen, Cecil 
Stewart leaves his ability to smile only 
with his eyes. 
Item XV. To John Carswell, Walter 
Cook leaves his M. O. S. (More Old 
Studying). 
Item XVI. To Jimmy Whitlow, Virgil 
Allen leaves his ability to remember 
history problems, for example, "Dates." 
Item XVII. To R. O. Renigar, Roy 
Cranford leaves his ability to operate 
the moving picture machine so that R. 
O. can get out of his classes. 
Item XVIII. To Chester Bovender, Joe 
Gallen leaves his ability to debate. We 
feel that Chester is in need of it. 
Item XIX. To Helen Lewis, the most 
silent student in school, we bequeath 
Wesley Zimmerman's talkativeness 
hoping that she will not spoil her re- 
cord by inheriting Wesley's laziness. 
Item XX. To Evelyn Caudle, we be- 
queath Clois . Renigar's curiosity in 
order that Evelyn may learn more 
about what is going on around her. 
Item XXI. To Louise Ervin, Geraldine 
Knight wishes to leave her dignity. 
(Any information as to the where- 
abouts of said bequest will be ap- 
preciated ) . 
Item XXII. To Marguerite Walker, 
Alice Johnson leaves her ability to hold 
her tongue and her shy modest man- 
ner. 
Item XXIII. To Daniel Sides, Ralph 
Leonard's gift of chewing two dozen 
packs of gum a week. 
Item XXIV. To Nancy Kimcl, Norma 
Minish bequeaths her Shakespeare 
notes, if Norma can get them from 
Miss Stephenson. 
Item XXV. To Edna Jackson, the ser- 
iousness of LeRoy Peebles. 
Item XXVI. To Frances Harrold the 

pep and vigor of Garnette Lynch. 
Item XXVII. To Tommy Shore, the 
singing qualities of Ernest, our Bing, 
the second. 
Item XXVIII. To Mack Sloan, the deep 
secrets of Hubert Weir's love-making. 
Item XXVI X. To Jack Brown, the hu- 
mor of J. E. Tate. 

BLACK AND GOLD 



Item XXX. To Maxine Tatum, the qui- 
et disposition of Margaret Bauguss. 

Section V 

To our Alma Mater, we bequeath our 
love and loyalty and wishes for her fu- 
ture growth and prosperity. 

Signed, sealed, published, and declar- 
ed by Helen Swaim, the testator, for the 
class of nineteen hundred and thirty - 
seven as their last will and testament. 
Witnesses: 

Roy Bovender, President 

Lucile Wyatt, Secretary 



^+ 



Hutchins Drug Store 

FOR COMPLETE FOUNTAIN 
AND DRUG SERVICE 



Located Across From 
State Theatre 




To High School Graduates 

Whatever you plan to do after grad- 
uation — whether you plan for college 
or business — your mental development 
must continue. 

The National Business College is a distinc- 
tive, private school of professional grade. 
Day and evening courses prepare high school 
graduates for immediate earnings. Many 
graduates who have acquired experience are 
now presidents, vice-presidents, cashiers, sec- 
retaries, treasurers and controllers of large 
corporations — others are in successful ac- 
countancy practice. 

The selection of a commercial school for your 
business training is of vital importance to 
vou. Write for beautifully illustrated cat- 
slog. 

National Business College 

Roanoke, Virginia 

Accredited by National Association of 
Accredited Commercial Schools, 






Page two hundred thtrtee 



,■::< 







u*Z 




<Jfc ir<c&i 



_7/2£ <z~>LmtiLz tfyift 



That lends the touch of friendship without 
the embarrasement of an obligation — 

YOUR PHOTOGRAPH 

V. Matthews ♦■♦♦-■♦ 

317 West Fourth Street 



Page two hundred fourteen 



BLACK AND GOLD 



WILL OF REYNOLDS JUNE CLASS 
(Continued from page 154) 

Long wills his peculiar walk to Lang- 
don Montgomery. Bill Tudor leaves his 
business nature to the business staff. 
David Reed leaves the baseball team 
without a good manager. Robert Sills 
leaves his reserved nature to Joe Dyer. 
Johnnie Prevost leaves his friendliness to 
the school as a worthy example. Bill 
Vogler leaves his track shoes to Charlie 
Reece who has burned his up on the cin- 
ders. Jim Brown wills his bushy mop to 
anyone who will buy a comb for it. 
Phyllis Bazemore wills her nice fat 
cheeks to Phyllis Gosselin. Sally Emer- 
son wills her extra 17 pounds of weight 
to Sarah Froeber. Bertha Teichman 
leaves her dry wit to Betty Sprunt. 
Lucy Mae Reavis leaves her star roles 



to Virginia Clay. Barbara Lasley wills 
that cute coiffure to Adelaide Gordon. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have 
hereto subscribed our name and affixed 
our seal, this first day of April, Anno 
Domini, Nineteen Hundred and Thirty 
Seven (1937). 

Paul H. Hendrix, Testator (SEAL) 
Signed, sealed, published, and declar- 
ed by the said senior class of nineteen 
hundred and thirty seven; as and for its 
last will and testament, in the presence 
of us, who, at its request, in its presence, 
and in the presence of each other, have 
hereunto subscribed our names as attend- 
ing witnesses to said instrument. 

Walter Winchell 

Duke of Windsor 

Wally Simpson 



School Girls Don't Eventually "Grow-up" to Sosnik's .... 
They BEGIN With the Best In 

SMART SCHOOL CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES 

<Jbo±nik i 

West Fourth at Spruce 



Winston -Salem, N. C. 

A private educational institution that teaches 
business only 

Licensed by the State Board of Commercial Education in North Carolina. 

Member National Association of Accredited Commercial Schools 



632 W. Fourth Street -Dial 2-0121 



Page two 



hundred sixteen 



BLACK AND 



GOLD 




Gentlemen, it seems as though 
Hanes Undershirts take all the 
washing and wear you can give 
them. They're bound to go, some 
day. of course. But from the first 
time on, straight through to the 
last, Hanes fits snug and trim — 
clasping close and neat below 
the armpits— stretching smoothly 
across your chest. And a Hanes 



tail goes deep into your shorts. 
It can't creep out at your waist! 
Every Hanes Shirt needs Hanes 
Shorts. No matter how big you 
are around the hams, you'll have 
room to sit, stoop, and walk with- 
out pinching or pulling. Colors 
guaranteed. See your Hanes 
Dealer today. P. H. Hanes Knit- 
ting Co.. Winston-Salem. N. C. 




BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred seventeen 



RULES FOR READING FROM 
CALVIN H. WILEY'S READER 

"In reading humorous pieces, the read- 
er must not laugh; but in reading mel- 
ancholy tidings or pathetic pieces, he 
may properly manifest emotions." 

"When reading you should look for- 
ward a little as you do in walking to see 
what is before you, what things will 
make you pause, and where you will 
stop." 

"Do not read as though you were 
reading or talking to yourself, but as 



~.* 




With Royal's Touch Control*, key-* 

is adapted to everyone's finger pi esdurc 

Price includes handsome carrying cswe. 

Payments from 75^ to $1.25 per wefck. 

(De Luxe Model illustrated.) 

W. S. DAVIS 
ROYAL TYPEWRITER Co. Inc. 

423 N. MAIN ST. DIAL 4981 



ROYAL PORTABLE 

with TOUCH CONTROL 



though you were telling something to 
another." 

"Avoid the habit of coughing and mak- 
ing other unpleasant noises, just as you 
are beginning to read." 

"Do not read as if you were hurrying 
through a task." 

"When you are alone, think of your 
faults; when with others correct those 
faults. Apply this rule in all things." 



4»~. 



Compliments of 

HAVERTY 
FURNITURE CO. 

521 N. LIBERTY ST. 

COMPLETE 

HOME FURNISHINGS 

* 

A Store Worthy of Winston-Salem 



►-* 




TAXICABS 

DIAL 7121 

Responsible 
White Drivers 



BAGGAGE 
TRANSFER 



Blue Bird Cab, 

INC. 



— *— — — — — *— ~ .* 
BLACK AND GOLD 



».►. — —i — — «-~— 

Page two hundred eighteen 



THOSE DEAR OLD DAYS 

(Tune: Love's Old Sweet Song) 

Once in the dear, dead days beyond re- 
call 

When I was a freshman roamin' round 

the hall, 
Out of the dreams that rose in happy 

throng 

I found that I was not where I belonged. 
And down the hall there came a senior 
bold 

Of whom I asked my whereabouts to 

be told. 
Just a frightened freshman 
Knowing not where to go, 
And the halls all ringing with people 

going to and fro. 
Still to me at times 
Come those old days, 
Come those old days. 



J-znoLx cy\unnz 



(-oLLzq 



(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 

FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE FOR 
MEN AND WOMEN 

Competent and Experienced Fac- 
ulty. Stands for high educational 
standards and high Christian 
character. Liberal Arts, Sciences, 
Teaching, Music, and Commercial 
Courses. 

Cost for boys $356.00— for girls 
$370.00 

Ideal climate. Altitude 1200 feet 

above sea level. For catalogue 

and other information write: 

P. E. Monroe, D. D., President 

Lenoir Rhyne College 

Hickory, N. C. 



*«.- 



Reddy Kilowatt Says: 

I have lifted drudgery from housework! 

I have brought comfort, leisure and convenience! 

I have saved eyesight! 

I have deterred crime by keeping cities lighted! 

I have revolutionized industry! 

I have carried city conveniences to farms! 

I am the symbol of your electric service. Make 
me a part of your plan for living and you will 
find you will spend less and enjoy life more! 

DUKE POWER COMPANY 

PHONE 7151 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred nineteen 



*-. 



ZENITH RADIOS 

GIBSON ELECTRIC 

REFRIGERATORS 

ABC WASHERS and IRONERS 

Crim, Brunt & Green, Inc. 

FURNITURE 

609 N. Liberty Street 
Telephone No. 4355 



~.* 




—* 



Better build schoolrooms for "the boy," 
Than cells and gibbets for "the man." 
Joseph Freeman 

Observation more than books, 

experience rather than persons, 
are the prime educators. 

To be a well-favored man is the gift of 
fortune, But to write and read comes by 
Nature. 

Shakespeare 



One of the largest business 
schools in America 

Accredited as a four-year col- 
lege in business field 

Ask for full information 
Address 

Bowling Green 
Business University 

INCORPORATED 

Bowling Green, Kentucky 



•!••*-■ 



Piedmont Federal Savings & Loan Association 

THE HOME OWNERS' FRIEND 

Members Federal Home Loan Bank System 
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

A. C. STUART. PRESIDENT N. MITCHELL, SECRETARY & TREASURER 

C. F. BENBOW, VICE PRESIDENT B. C. BOOE, ATTORNEY 

G. W. DOUGLAS I. M. BROWN WM. T. WILSON 

W. P. LANDRETH C. C. SMITHDEAL 

16 West 3rd Street Dial 5294 



*- 



Expect More At Stockton's 

More Style — Quality — Service 

418 Trade Street 




Page two hundred twenty 



BLACK AND GOLD 



THE COUNTRY BOY 

Hate to be a city boy. 

Rather be a hick 
'Cause if I had them frills and things, 

I sho' would want to kick. 
Rather have the country life 

Than all the city's airs, 
Rather have my natural head 
Than all the frizzy hairs. 
Rather do the country work, 

And have a lot of fun, 
Than living in the big old city. 

Where you can't even see the sun. 
Rather play my anagrams 

Than see a pitcher show, 
Rather eat the country ham 

Than all the city dough. 

— Rosemary Nunn 



_«* 



Some Young Men 

LOOK WELL 
IN ANY CLOTHES 



BUT MOST YOUNG MEN 

LOOK WELL IN 
HINE-BAGBY CLOTHES 

Men with ideal physiques act- 
ually "make" their clothes, 
whether good, bad, or indif- 
ferent. The rest of us, lack- 
ing that rare asset of perfect 
build, must rely on the best in 
clothes to bring out the best 
in us. 



HINE-BAGBY CO. 



*— 



*- 



NORGE 

REFRIGERATORS 

The only refrigerator 
with a Ten Year guar- 
antee 

SEE— 

ROLLATOR COMPRESSOR 
THE QUIET MOTOR 
CONVENIENT RACKS 
BEAUTY 



PHILCO 

RADIOS 

"FOREIGN RECEPTION" 



HEAR YE— 

BASEBALL NEWS 
DANCE MUSIC 
NEWS FLASHES 

Be Sure To Include The Philco 
ALL-WAVE AERIAL 



WILLIAMS & WHALING, Inc. 



NISSEN BUILDING 



PHONE 5673 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred twenty-one 



*-. 



£. Sc M. Uafordaaljmj IMjop 



Exclusive Men's Store 



431 North Liberty Street 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 



SOUTH JUNE PROPHECY In Paris, Virginia Linville and Ruth 

(Continued from page 45) Brannon display talents for designing 

ed in the dear ole U. S. A. a month ago. nats - 

Frances Forcum is also in China as a M Y- what an interesting afternoon I 

„,-„■„,„, had! Times Square was just like a South 

misbiondry. 

William Trevathan and Roy Cranford Hi 9 h reunion, 
can be found in Southern Africa selling 
the natives a red La Salle with green 
wheels. 



r 



^?£e dll&k Spot of tke <©o«Vr 



Visit Our 

ROOF GARDEN AND COFFEE SHOP 



fylotd <3to&evt & £< 



ee 



W. T. Tennille^Manager 



(pfonnM {Jon &entocs 

For tke privilege of serving you in the capacity of 
Engravers. 

Your patronage in the future is earnestly solicited 

Phone 2-1303 «4 West 4fh St. 



I 



Page two hundred twenty-two 



BLACK AND GOLD 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Central Cadillac La-Salle 



224 N. Marshall St. 

Cadillac — La-Salle — Oldsmobile 

Sales and Service Phone 4173 



LAST WILL OF JUNE CLASS 
(Continued from page 82) 

We appoint as our executor, Mr. R. 
A. Swaringen, and to our last will and 
testament do set our hand and seal on 
this the sixteenth day of February in 
1937 A. D. 

Witnesses: 

William Shakespeare 

Li'l Abner 

Simone Simon 
»—.... — — ^ — ,_■ ■■, ,,, ,_, ,., . .. . . _ . » .. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION 
TO NEEDS OF GRADUATES 

We outfit you from 
"head to foot." 



Quality Merchandise — Reasonable Prices 







Smartness — Style — Economy 

Three Reasons for Your Wanting to Own a 

Ford V-8 



PAUL BENNETT MOTOR CO. 

Sixth And Marshall Sts. 



Headquarters for Sporting Goods 

Anything You Want in 

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
BROWN-ROGERS-DIXSON 

THE BEST PLACE TO GET IT 









BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred twenty-three 




•'.-- 












Can you name the parts? see page 227 



PLEASANTS HARDWARE CO. 

Harness, Riding Equipment 
Hardware, Paints 



*— — ■ 



Corner 6th and Trade Sts. 



Dial 7119 



i 



PLYMOUTH DODGE 

C. C. DIJUEE MCTCLGJ • INC. 

2CC l« 21 6 NORTH MUM ill 

Service on all Makes of Cars. 
Complete Metal, Body and Repair Department 



Office and Sales, Dial 7SOI 



Service, Dial 7782 



_ — — — — — — ~ — ~— _ —~~- ~— ►— -~— *. 



~.* 4.-.. 



Barber Photo Supply Co. 

Commercial Photographers 



KODAKS COPYING 

FINISHING ENLARGING 

FRAMING TINTING 

106 W. 5th. St., Opp. Post Office 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



When You Think of 

Drugs, Soda Water, 
Toilet Articles, or Candy 

Remember 

O'Hanlon's Is The Place 



Little fly, up on the wall, 
Ain't you got no clothes at all? 
Ain't you got no pettic skirt? 
Ain't you got no undershirt? 
Ain't you cold? 

Mary Louise Rhodes 



VOGLER 

SERVICE 

"Dependable for more than 79 yearn 

AMBULANCE 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

DIAL 6101 



ALL KINDS OF INSURANCE 

Pilot Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 

Cor. 4th and Spruce Sts. 
Phone 6123 



FORREST J. WRIGHT 



E. T. PULLEN 






QUICK DELIVERY 
Complete Stock— Pleasant Clerks 

Two Pharmacists 
to serve you day or night 



i- 



You are always welcome at 

Carolina Drug Store 



West 4th & Spruce Sts. 



Dial 4131 



Quality Insurance 

Of course, there is such a thing as 
high quality and low quality in- 
surance — just as there is in every 
other service or commodity. 
The danger, however, lies in the 
fact that inferior insurance is 
worse than worthless. It fails at 
the critical point — the point where 
you suffer a loss. 
When you need protection there is 
only one kind to buy. That's sure 
protection. If you will let us con- 
sult with you regarding your in- 
surance requirements, you need 
have no fears on that score. Call 
7140. 

The Follin Co. 

249 N. Main St. 



— * *— 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred twenty-five 





Distinctive 

Convenient 

Baggage 






THREE 




The Student Will Be Proud To 

Claim When He Arrives 

at College 

H 1 N E'S West Fourth Street 






DRUG STORES 

Bobbits Pharmacy 
Nissen Drug Company 
Bobbit Drug Company 



In Stokes County Academy, during 
the early nineteeth century, students were 
punished for disobedience according to 
the following rules: 

Boys and girls playing together-. 4 lashes 
For wearing long finger nails, _2 lashes 
Coming to school with dirty faces and 

hands 2 lashes 

For blotting copy book 5 lashes 

Nicknaming each other 4 lashes 

For not making a bow when you come 

in or go out 2 lashes 

Swearing at school 8 lashes 



* 

For hollowing and hooping going home 

3 lashes 

For not saying yes sir and no sir and yes 

marm and no marm 2 lashes 

For troubling each other writing affares 

2 lashes 

For calling each other liars 4 lashes 

Telling tales out of school 8 lashes 

Blackguarding each other 6 lashes 

For drinking spiritous liquors at school 

6 lashes 

Giving each other ill names 3 lashes 

Telling lies __7 lashes 






Graduates of 1937 
A LONG OUT LOOK IS SEEN FOR YOU 




Like The Giraff You 

Have Come Through 

At The Top 

Many other goals will be equally as hard to reach. Higher 

aims and honest efforts will bring even greater pleasure 

than this. May We Congratulate You. 

DEWEYS . . Your Retail Baker 

West 4th St. Dial 2-2645 City Market 

Pure Ingredients Make Better Foods 



Page two hundred twenty-six 



BLACK AND COLD 



Answers to "A Student's Nightmare" 
Right Figure 

Head and arms Miss Moore 

Coat Mr. Barnette 

Skirt Miss Weaver 

Feet Miss Ervin 

Center Figure 

Head Mr. Pfohl 

Coat Miss Emmart 

Arms Mr. Rose 

Trousers Mr. Jackson 

Feet Miss Faye Martin 

Left Figure 

Head - Mrs. Reich 

Coat Mr. Shealy 

Skirt Miss Lumpkin 

Feet : . .Miss Flossie Martin 

Arm Miss Whitley 



*.►. 



+— 



Southern 

Furniture Co. 

FURNITURE AND HOUSE- 
FURNISHING GOODS 



Cor. 12th and Liberty Streets 



*»~ 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

Rawls- Dixon 

Candy Co., Inc. 

"Sweeten the Day the 
R. D. Way" 



THE IDEAL 

West Fourth Street 

Winston-Salem 



'The best place to shop 
after all" 



— * 



T 



WIN CITY 

Dry Cleaning Co. X 

REMEMBER— 

Dry Cleaning is not a side line 
with us. We specialize in 

Blocking Knitted And 
Crocheted Suits 

Pleating in any size and style 
612 West Fourth St. Tel. 7106 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



'A Bank of Friendliness" 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred twenty seven 



1927 10 Years .... 

OUT IN FRONT FOR TEN YEARS 



1937 



Morris-Early and Co*, Imc* 

Has Led in Home Furnishing 

Furniture - Rugs - Draperies 

Quality First 



514 West 4th St. 



Dial 4168 



AGE OF SLANG Kicked the bucket: 1785 

Follow one's nose: 1620 Lazybones: 1593 

Gag (a joke): 1823 Keep a stiff upper lip: 1833 

Gift of gab: 1650 In a jiffy: 1793 

Make hay while the sun shines: 1509 Hit the nail on the head: 1719 
Henpecked: 1690 "Readers Digest" 




Page two hundred twenty-eight 



BLACK AND GOLD 



MARSHALL SCHOOL 
OF BEAUTY CULTURE 

Fully Accredited 

Complete Scientific Course in 
All Branches 

Call or Write [or Free Literature 

4th & Spruce Phone 8234 



*— - 



►~+ 



Our First and Only Duty 
is to 

Interpret Style 

For The Various Figure Types. 



*S3SSt 



624 West Fourth St. 
Dial 8031 for Appointments 



This Little Spot 

is For 

Miss 

She is 2 sweet 
2 Be 



4 Gotten 



►-* 



All Eyes Follow 

INDERA 
FIGURFIT 

Styles For 

1937 

Season 

Sold By Your 
Favorite Dealer 

The Tropic 
Trunk For 

Men and Boys 

New Models 

For Women 

And Girls 

Made In 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

By 

INDERA 
MILLS CO. 




re - 



It Pays 
To Look Weir 



HOTEL ROBERT E. LEE 
BARBER SHOP 



Raleigh, N. C. 
A College For Young Women 

Courses offered in Arts and Sci- 
ences, in Music, in Art, leading 
to the B. A. or the B. S. degree. 

ACCEPTED AS STANDARD BY 

1. The Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

2. The American Association of University 
Women. 

3. The Association of American Universities. 

Prepares for life, for vocation, or 
for further study. 

Dormitories fire-proof, with mod' 
ern conveniences. 

Charges reasonable. 

For catalogue or further informa- 
tion write 

Chas. E. Brewer, 
President. 



*.►. 



BLACK AND GOLD 



~i 



Page two hundred twenty-nine 



*$»»»-<• 



1889 



1937 



48 Years 

Savings and loans 

Winston-Salem 
Building & Loan Assn. 



I M. G. Follin, Secy, and Treas. 
I 



* AT SALEM, A HALF CENTRY AGO: 

The front doors of Main Hall were 
only open at Easter and graduation. The 
first floor windows were painted. Boys 
were not allowed to stroll around in 
front of the college. School began at 
7:30 in the morning. Students were re- 
quired to go to church every Sunday and 
were required to keep their eyes toward 
the altar. 



${% 



K^&ve^iiL 



•on re ^»rej 

About Your Personal Appearance All Men Know You Are Inclined 
To Be Careful About All Other Things 

STITHS ARE CAREFUL 

About Where and What We Select For Your Approval 



RANKAST1THCO 



=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=iii=i 
in 



i=iii=iii=ni 



THE ROLL CALL 
1. Dotty Dunce 



2. Daisy Dimples 

3. Tommy Terrible 

4. Dicky Dictionary 

5. Polly Pretty 

6. Pauly Piggy 

7. Sally Silly 

8. Molly Mouthy .... 

9. Dilly Dancey .., 

10. Lilly Leany 



:lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=m=lll=.lll= 

re two hundred thirty 



l=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll=lll= 

BLACK AND GOLD 



cztj 1J± vox czrfutoaxafini 



A is for 



B is for 



C is for 



D is for 



E is for 



is 



for 



G is for 



H is for 



I is for 



J is for 



K is for 



L is for 



M is for 



N is for 



O is for 



P is for 



Q is for 



R is for 



is 



foi 



T is for 



U is for 



V is for 



W is for 



X is for 



Y is for 



is 



for 



BLACK AND GOLD 



Page two hundred thirty-one 



Composition, Presswork, and Binding 

by the 

Richard }. Reynolds High School Print Shop 

Richard J. Reynolds High School 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 





For 



No* to bo 

tstkon "ffworra 
this library 



North Carcli-na Room 

Forsyth County PubHc Libra 
660 West Fifth Street 
Winston-Salem, NC 27101 







' 









! 



I 



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